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Thread: Can thyroid gland regenerate? page 2

  1. #11
    Omni's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lindacat View Post
    I was diagnosed with Hashimoto's thyroid when I was 18. I am now 62 and have been on thyroid supplement all my life; currently on Armour Thyroid for 10+ years and feel great. However, I was just curious about whether or not the damage/destruction to the thyroid that is caused by Hashimoto's can ever be reversed? - i.e. will I ever be able to stop taking the Armour thyroid? Just curious if anyone had any thoughts - I have been Paleo only for 3 months, but losing weight and inches and loving the way I feel now!
    Have you discussed this idea with your doctor, to reduce or eliminate your dose of Armour would best be done in a controlled manner with your doctor on board so you can get more frequent testing when in the transition stage.
    My partner is currently in the final stages of Graves Disease (Hyperthyroid) treatment, all levels normal and will attempt remission in the near future. She records body temp & resting heart rate morning & evening, these are great indicators if your levels start to go up or down, she also keeps a symptoms journal just to track any changes she feels are occuring.
    I don't know if your thyroid can regenerate, but the human body can often surprise us.
    Either way going to a healthier diet and lifestyle may well mean you may need to adjust your dosage, be aware that a lot of people going Paleo inadvertantly increase their consumption of Goitrogens (Cabbage family) and these have a suppressive effect on thyroid, so in your case you should keep an eye on these and keep intake to lower levels.
    Good luck with it all.

  2. #12
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    This new video from Dr. Brownstein was just released.
    Iodine: Why You Need It

    Grizz

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Grizz View Post
    This new video from Dr. Brownstein was just released.
    Iodine: Why You Need It

    Grizz
    Hopefully people take the note under the video in to consideration.

    "Disclaimer: All information and results stated in this video are for information purposes only. The information is not specific medical advice for any individual. The content of this video should not substitute medical advice from a health professional. If you have a health problem, speak to your doctor or a health professional immediately about your condition."

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Forgotmylastusername View Post
    Hopefully people take the note under the video in to consideration.

    "Disclaimer: All information and results stated in this video are for information purposes only. The information is not specific medical advice for any individual. The content of this video should not substitute medical advice from a health professional. If you have a health problem, speak to your doctor or a health professional immediately about your condition."
    Certainly, everyone including myself agrees with that. Iodine should be taken as a supplement to PREVENT health problems. Just like you take vitamin D3 to prevent health problems. Your body requires iodine to be healthy, and whether you get your iodine from contaminated seafoods or from pure Lugols or iodoral makes little difference. Get your iodine (with required supplements) any way you can.

    Iodine the Next Vitamin D
    Iodine: the Next Vitamin D? Part I | Longevity and Aging Research Articles | Longevity Medicine Review
    Iodine: the Next Vitamin D? Part II | Longevity and Aging Research Articles | Longevity Medicine Review

    - - - Iodine is used by the prostate + Stomach
    - - - Iodide (SSKI) is used by the thyroid + skin + Salivary
    - - - kidneys, spleen, liver, blood, breasts & intestines can use either form

    Iodine prevents Fibrocystic Breast Disease, PCOS, Cysts, Endometriosis, goiters & hypothyroid:
    Iodine Deficiency - An Under-Recognized Epidemic

    Dr. Flechas reinforces the need for iodine supplements to prevent the above disease:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5O6LDqyZguU

    Dr. Kruse says this about Fibrocystic Breast Disease, prevented by iodine supplements:
    http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum...tml#post860414

    Complete iodine research references with testimonials here:
    http://tinyurl.com/iodine-references

    Grizz
    Last edited by Grizz; 06-19-2012 at 05:54 AM.

  5. #15
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    New Posting at the Dr. Brownstein Blog
    ============================
    Sunday, June 17, 2012
    Iodine Deficiency Still Occurring At Epidemic Rates

    At my office, my partners and I have found that Iodine deficiency is occurring at epidemic rates. We have tested over 6,000 patients and found the vast majority significantly low in iodine. Iodine is an essential nutrient; we cannot live without it. Iodine concentrates in the glandular tissue. It helps to ensure that the glandular tissue is healthy and maintains a normal architecture. A deficiency in iodine sets the stage for problems with the glandular tissue.

    Which tissues comprise the glandular tissue? The breast, ovaries, uterus, prostate, and thyroid gland all are part of the glandular tissue. A deficiency in iodine can cause a disrupted architecture of the glandular tissue. This can ultimately lead to problems such as cysts, nodules, dysplasia and cancer of these tissues. Unfortunately, we are in the midst of an epidemic rise in cancer of the breasts, ovaries, uterus, thyroid and prostate. I believe iodine deficiency is (in part) responsible for this epidemic rise in cancer and other diseases of these tissues.

    However, it is not just cancer that is a consequence of iodine deficiency. If a pregnant woman is deficient in iodine, the fetus will also suffer complications. An article in Nutrients (2011;3:265-273) describes the fetal consequences of iodine deficiency. During the first trimester, the fetus is dependent on the thyroid hormone produced by the mother. If the mother is deficient in thyroid hormone, the fetus’ thyroid will not develop normally and the fetus may be subjected to neurological problems.


    According to the article, in order for a pregnant woman to produce enough thyroid hormone to meet both her own and the baby’s requirements, a 50% increase in iodine intake is recommended. Adequate iodine levels are needed to produce thyroid hormone. Iodine deficiency in the mother results in damage to the fetal brain which is aggravated by fetal hypothyroidism.

    I have been writing and lecturing about thyroid problems and iodine deficiency for nearly 20 years. Unfortunately, over this time period, iodine deficiency is still occurring at epidemic rates. I have no doubt that if we do not correct this decline, the increasing burden of illness will lower our standard of living.

    Iodine deficiency should be a national health concern addressed by the highest levels of the government. Since it takes 100 years (my estimate) for the government to react, I say that you should not wait; take matters into your own hands. Educate yourself about iodine and have your levels checked. If you are low in iodine, I suggest supplementing with iodine. More importantly, it is vitally important for women of child-bearing age to have their iodine levels assessed before they become pregnant.
    Dr. David Brownstein - Holistic Family Medicine

    PS) Get your latest Version Iodine Supplement Guide by Dr. Buist here:
    http://steppingstonesliving.com/resources/iodine/

    Grizz
    Last edited by Grizz; 06-19-2012 at 11:02 AM.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paleobird View Post
    Anyone making medical diagnoses over the net without ever meeting their "patient" is not a real doctor, IMO, and should have their license revoked. That is the height of irresponsibility.
    I don't really believe it's any different than the 20+ doctors I have been physically seen by over my lifetime. They usually don't even touch you but just ask alot of questions. Rarely does my endo, OB, or GP do more than that before prescribing medication that may or may not be really dangerous for me. I had one doctor who hadn't even seen my 15 year old daughter as he lived 3 States away and was the only Pediatric endocrinologist in the area. He actually prescribed a medication that can be perminantly damaging to the liver and possibly fatal to someone as young as her, (over the phone and without even seeing a picture of her) but only going off of her very limited lab tests that had been done by her Pediatrician. The last time I took my 5 year old son to the doctor as he had a 105.2 fever( just 1 month ago). The doctor didn't even touch him but asked me what his symptoms were and then told me he had a childhood illness called 5th disease without any other tests. How is that any different than sending lab results to an online doctor who then listens to your issues and asks questions before giving advice and/ or having you get more lab work done?

  7. #17
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    The internet "Doctors" are all peddling their supplements and/or books. Right but it's the real doctors who are the evil money grubbers. (?)

    Mom5booklover, you seem to have had a lot of bad experiences with incompetent doctors and I'm very sorry that that has happened to you. That said, there are a lot of very competent and caring doctors out there, one's who take time with their patient, actually examine them, and don't automatically toss pills at everything. If you don't have those doctors, then vote with your feet and find them. They do exist.

    Advocating "supplements" that can actually be deadly depending on the personal details over the net is still irresponsible and should be grounds for revocation of a medical credential. These pseudo-docs can hide behind disclaimers such as the one quoted above and behind the fact that the supplement industry is very loosely regulated. Real doctors are held to a higher standard.

  8. #18
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    PaleoBird,

    Read this message from MistyLuna, I'm sure she will disagree with your extremely negative attitude on iodine:
    I am 47 years old and have suffered from FBD since my early 20s. Additionally I have dense breasts, and have had benign cysts removed on 2 occasions. My breast pain was continuous. I decided on Iodine after tests indicated another cyst back in December of 2011. I commenced iodine therapy (5 mg iodine) and IMMEDIATELY (no joke) my breasts became less sensitive. I gradually worked up my dosage to 50 mg daily (now on Iodoral). My menses have become regular and pain free. I do still get sensitive breasts right prior to the start of my period-BUT if I take an ADDITIONAL 12.5 mg of iodine, the pain IMMEDIATELY (no joke) goes away! I did have detox systems (all the typical ones listed), but I just plugged away with the iodine and about a month ago the detox symptoms ceased.

    My husband and I take Boron because it is a cofactor of D3. My husband has taken 50,000 i.u. of D3 daily since November 2011 and I have taken 30,000 i.u. of D3 daily since November 2011--as we were both severely deficient. Testing indicated 7 ng/ml for my husband and 32 ng/ml for me. We just got back our most recent d3 test last week, and my husband is now at 85 ng/ml and I am now at 74 ng/ml. My husband takes 9 mg Boron daily and I take 6 mg Boron daily.

    Regarding Lugol's and my husband, we worked him about to an incredible 200 mg daily--and he has FEW detox symptoms. Just a few detox pimples on his face. But, these are starting to subside.

    We both feel INCREDIBLE!

    PS thank you for the WARM WELCOME!!

    ============================
    Misty added this:
    Sadly, my doctor told me nothing about FBD--I had to do my own research.

    Years and years ago, when I was a toddler (remember I am 47 now), my Mom would take me to a holistic physician--and he had me on iodine. He passed away, and we switched to a CW physician, and all the Healthy Stuff stopped. Well not really--we continued to eat minimally processed foods and take a multitude of supplements--including kelp.

    About 10 years ago, on my own, I stopped the kelp supplements because I was concerned with contamination. My hormonal health really did take a spiral down--but I felt there was nothing I could do but suffer thru it.

    This last fall (2011) when both my husband and I discovered we had hormonal issues, and we just did not like the medical options being offered to us-we decided to do research on our own.

    We researched the Japanese lifestyle, and realized that Vitamin d3 and Iodine were missing from our American ways. We cut out processed foods, including sugar, and went organic as much as possible. We eat reasonable portions of meat but include tons of fresh veggies and nuts and a bit of fruit. No breads, no cakes, no cookies. Since we are on our own here, it is wonderful to find this site. We also peruse the Vitamin D council website and facebook page. We are sleeping better, we have lost weight, we have increased energy and better moods.

    Please continue to post, Grizz--I have been reading your posts and learning. You just never know who you're positively impacting.
    What are you going to say about Misty's AMAZING success? She just posted these messages today.

    Also, your "Real Doctors" have no idea how to cure Fibrocystic Breasts, PCOS, & Cysts because it is our experience that they know NOTHING about iodine, as we can see in Misty's case history above.

    Grizz
    Last edited by Grizz; 06-19-2012 at 03:00 PM.

  9. #19
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    Anecdote
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    An anecdote is a short and amusing or interesting story about a real incident or person. It may be as brief as the setting and provocation of a bon mot. An anecdote is always presented as based in a real incident[1] involving actual persons, whether famous or not, usually in an identifiable place. However, over time, modification in reuse may convert a particular anecdote to a fictional piece, one that is retold but is "too good to be true".

    The word 'anecdote'is an amusing short story (in Greek: "unpublished", literally "not given out") comes from Procopius of Caesarea, the biographer of Justinian I, who produced a work entitled Ἀνέκδοτα (Anekdota, variously translated as Unpublished Memoirs or Secret History), which is primarily a collection of short incidents from the private life of the Byzantine court. Gradually, the term anecdote came to be applied[4] to any short tale utilized to emphasize or illustrate whatever point the author wished to make.[5]
    [edit]Qualification as Evidence

    Main article: Anecdotal evidence
    Anecdotal evidence is an informal account of evidence in the form of an anecdote. The term is often used in contrast to scientific evidence, as evidence that cannot be investigated using the scientific method. The problem with arguing based on anecdotal evidence is that anecdotal evidence is not necessarily typical; only statistical evidence can determine how typical something is. Misuse of anecdotal evidence is a logical fallacy.

  10. #20
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    Paleobird....I'm not disregarding a physical examination and consultation of the patient in the least. What I've seen says evidence indicates that a patient history is the most telling portion of the exam. But, this along with lab values can be sent and received over the internet.

    There are nuances that will definitely be missed in neuromusculoskeletal assessment without that physical evaluation, but lets face it...your standard MD isn't very well qualified for that anyway. No, they are focusing on internal medicine and biochemical markers and other "numbers" which are all accessible via e-mail or fax. Then they order more tests or not and verify the results....Easily manageable without human contact....IMO you can be a good nuff internist or endocrinologist via the internet given that most of their diagnosis and recommended interventions come via lab numbers.

    Oh, and by the way if your gonna go to and MD or DO at least find out if they practice Functional Medicine. Over the net or in person a pill pusher is a pill pusher.
    Last edited by Neckhammer; 06-19-2012 at 06:48 PM.

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