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  1. #31
    Wrenwood's Avatar
    Wrenwood is offline Senior Member
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    My opinion - the way that you use that actually results in you not smoking is the best way to stop. I had quit many times, mostly cold turkey, and always ended up going back. I finally tapered off of cigarettes over several months and haven't smoked in a year.

    I also deeply resented the advice of other people about how to quit, and why to quit, even though I knew it was the most stupid and self-destructive thing I ever did in getting started (I didn't smoke until my 30's).

    But watching my husband die of cancer at 46, shrinking from a 175-lb beautiful healthy and very fit guy (46 inch chest, 32 inch waist) to a 100-lb bald ghost who couldn't walk or eat or pee on his own, did wonders for my resolve. I am sorry to be so blunt. Maybe you don't need to hear that and I don't mean to make an enemy. He quit cold turkey when he was diagnosed... too late.

    I wish you every chance for a healthy life free of this enslavement. And I do know how tough it can be.
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  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wrenwood View Post
    My opinion - the way that you use that actually results in you not smoking is the best way to stop. I had quit many times, mostly cold turkey, and always ended up going back. I finally tapered off of cigarettes over several months and haven't smoked in a year.

    I also deeply resented the advice of other people about how to quit, and why to quit, even though I knew it was the most stupid and self-destructive thing I ever did in getting started (I didn't smoke until my 30's).

    But watching my husband die of cancer at 46, shrinking from a 175-lb beautiful healthy and very fit guy (46 inch chest, 32 inch waist) to a 100-lb bald ghost who couldn't walk or eat or pee on his own, did wonders for my resolve. I am sorry to be so blunt. Maybe you don't need to hear that and I don't mean to make an enemy. He quit cold turkey when he was diagnosed... too late.

    I wish you every chance for a healthy life free of this enslavement. And I do know how tough it can be.
    All of what you say here is 100% true. You've lived the horrors of this thing. It is an epidemic and it amazes me how many people don't get it. It kills more people than drugs (both prescription and illegal), alcohol, car accidents and Aids combined each year and the numbers are not even close!! The truth is hard to accept when you are an addict. This drug (nicotine) is very cunning. It plays deeply with one's mind.

  3. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paleobird View Post
    Interesting story and well done on the 500 days. What do you think it was that changed for you in January 2011?
    Thanks!

    Well, I had several friends with whom I would usually take smoking breaks with, and we'd smoke a lot at parties and such. At one such party, some of them said they planned to stop, and I knew that one other smoking friend was going away for a month, so it just seemed like an opportune moment. The next day I actually went out to smoke the last cigarette late at night, just so there wouldn't be any left the next morning. Around this time was also when I had first started to take exercise more seriously, so that helped as well. What exactly changed in me I'm not sure, but after smoking that last one I just felt differently. It was a couple of weeks until I hung out with the friends again, and they hadn't actually managed to quit quite yet, but I didn't feel compelled to start again, whereas previously I would think 'just one more'...
    So I guess I don't really know what exactly changed my motivation, but I recognized that something 'clicked' and went with it.

  4. #34
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    This amazing book helped me. It currently has 794 5-star reviews and if you try it you'll see why.

    You can use his method whether or not you have already stopped. IT REALLY WORKS (please excuse the caps).

    Don't be tempted by gum - it is every bit as addictive as cigarettes.

  5. #35
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    Best of luck! I actually just hit 8 years myself today. Be vigilant, I still get the odd craving!

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by friesonmyburger View Post
    Best of luck! I actually just hit 8 years myself today. Be vigilant, I still get the odd craving!
    That odd craving will never leave you. That is the insidious nature of this drug. It is so ingrained in one's being that it is truly a lifetime thing. I quit almost 25 years ago and I still sometimes have vivid dreams where I am smoking and I can taste it like it were today. The good news is that smoking again is not even remotely an option. I am in far superior shape/health than those who kept on smoking and the gap gets bigger exponentially each year.

    As I said earlier, there is no luck involved. You MUST decide to absolutely quit smoking forever or it's not going to happen. It'll keep pulling you in. I don't think that OP is ready for such a commitment. Not to be negative either. His words and actions tell me otherwise. I have never even once see a regular smoker "quit" but only have one or a couple while drinking or for stress etc etc, that hasn't gone back to full fledged smoking. Not once. And every single one of them argued with me that it was no problem that they had it under control. Some to the point of getting down right pissed off! In every case, they were in a very short time back to full on smoking. This stuff is that addictive. To stop for good you must come to terms with the fact that you can't ever have even one ever again. Its that cut and dried. This applies to the vast vast majority of people. Almost everyone.

  7. #37
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    Go buy some Hagen Daazs, several containers & flavors without the carageenan: strawberry, coffee, vanilla & chocolate. You must quit smoking; I ate a lot of frozen yogurt back in the day when I quit.

  8. #38
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    I quit six years ago. I had tried several times, but it really hit me when I was standing outside in the park next to the cancer hospital after my mother had her third surgery--her cancer wasn't smoking related, but I realized just how stupid it was to be smoking when I have a family history like mine.

    I made the decision, and at 7:55 am on the following Monday, I quit. I know for me, one puff will turn into one cigarette, and then I will be buying a pack. I can never, ever smoke again. I had to shift all my thinking to start calling myself a non-smoker, even from that very first day. Until I stopped defining myself as a smoker who was quitting and started thinking of myself as a person who did not ever smoke, I never managed to succeed.

    I developed a pack-a-day gum habit for a while, which now means I can't chew gum either because it reminds me of feeling so ill when I quit. But I remember vividly the day my sense of smell really came back. It was spring, and I went for a walk at lunchtime because that was one of my strategies for coping with cravings. I was walking down a tree-lined street when suddenly my nose was filled with the scent of sun-warmed lilacs. Amazing.

    Other incentives? My new boyfriend was allergic to cigarette smoke and couldn't kiss me if I'd just had one, and his kisses were worth not smoking--that guy is now my partner of six years. I saved up all the money I would have spent on smokes and bought myself treats: fresh flowers, new clothes, and most memorably, eventually a really great antique maple wardrobe. I used the quitnet website and was amazed to watch the ticker go by and realize how much money I'd saved (approaching $10,000 at this point, and that's not accounting for price increases).

    It also counts how many cigarettes I haven't smoked (26808), but in my mind, that will always only be one, the next one, because that's the only one I ever have to pass up.
    If I didn't define myself for myself, I would be crunched into other people's fantasies for me and eaten alive. --Audre Lorde

    Owly's Journal

  9. #39
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    Owly, what a great description of mentally coping with addiction. I have been through a similar experience with self-injury. I still struggle with the identity portion, with being a "former" cutter. To me, it feels like a part of me that will never leave, though I wish it would.
    Journal on depression/anxiety
    Currently trying to figure out WTF to eat (for IBS-C).

  10. #40
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    If you're quitting you would quit today, not tomorrow.

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