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Thread: Will a crockpot make any beef tender?

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  1. #1
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    Will a crockpot make any beef tender?

    I have a package of "stew" beef from our 1/4 cow purchase in the freezer. The last package, when just sauteed in a pan, was chewy/tough as heck. It is already cut into cubes. Will putting the next batch of meat in a crockpot for a few hours on low heat increase the likelihood of this meat not having the consistency of leather?

  2. #2
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    Yes. Just add some liquid. I suggest "stewing" the stew meat. Red wine is good.

  3. #3
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    Stew beef is meant to be cooked long and low - so yes, either a crock pot or long, slow simmering in a pot on the stove is the way to go.

  4. #4
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    If you don't mind spending a little cash and want guaranteed tender meat, get yourself a pressure cooker. You absolutely cannot cook anything and have it come out tough.
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  5. #5
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    We give our stew meat a good sear in a pan on the stove, then cook it in the crock pot for at least 6 hours.
    --Trish (Bork)
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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dr. Bork Bork View Post
    We give our stew meat a good sear in a pan on the stove, then cook it in the crock pot for at least 6 hours.
    +10!

    I've NEVER had any piece of meat not *fall apart* once Crocked! Plus, with a crock, it is REALLY HARD to overcook anything. As long as there is liquid in the pot, it tenderizes (OK 48 hours I've never had happen however, a 6 hour roast ended up going for 12 and turned out terrific!)

    As all of us have different *STAGES* in our daily lives, here is MY suggestion:

    If you have time the night before or the morning of before work: Build and use a crockpot.

    If you get home and forgot to defrost or build your dinner: Pressure Cooker

    If you get home and have TONS of time to cook: Fuck you I hate you! (smiles)
    Last edited by DeilaMiah; 06-18-2012 at 03:22 PM.
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  7. #7
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    We give our stew meat a good sear in a pan on the stove, then cook it in the crock pot for at least 6 hours.
    This is the only way to cook non-steak beef IMO!

  8. #8
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    Second on the pressure cooker. That's the fastest and surest way to tender beef. Usually, but not always, the crockpot works too after several hours.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by loneviking View Post
    Second on the pressure cooker. That's the fastest and surest way to tender beef. Usually, but not always, the crockpot works too after several hours.
    Oh sweetie. The crockpot works ALWAYS. I remember the FIRST crockpot meal my grandma made in 1977, a chicken. Although bought to keep her OUT of the kitchen, she spent all day at home, checking *the pot* every 15-30 minutes. What should have been 6 hours became 10 because of the *peeks*.

    I have used, or been in the household of, a crockpot for well over 30 years. There's been NO CUT of meat that didn't get tender while being crocked.

    Seriously. The only way to Frig it up is to forget you have a crockpot going for a couple days.

    Perhaps loneviking should attempt a few more recipes.
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  10. #10
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    Feb 2011
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    Thanks everyone. What exactly makes stew beef stew beef? How is that muscle fiber physiologically different than tenderloin muscle fiber? Or is it not the muscle fibers but the connective tissue? I suppose I can use the google machine to answer this as well

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