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Thread: Will a crockpot make any beef tender? page 2

  1. #11
    Grumpycakes's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gavinWang2 View Post
    We give our stew meat a good sear in a pan on the stove
    No you don't. Dr. Bork Bork does. Stop lying. You are a bot. You don't even have a brain.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Grumpycakes View Post
    No you don't. Dr. Bork Bork does. Stop lying. You are a bot. You don't even have a brain.
    I found myself totally relating to a post on another thread this morning.

    Then I realized it was my own post from almost a year ago.

    Freaking bots.
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  3. #13
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    Stew meat is a generic name for a combination of different cuts that are often left over from butchering a side of beef. It usually has lots of fat and connective tissue. Slow and low (crockpot or smoker) will give the connective tissue a chance to melt and turn into a juicy liquid that is reabsorbed by the meat. This transforms chewy and tough into juicy and tender.

    For stews, if you want a really tender meat, get a chuck roast and cut it down yourself, then brown and cook (btw pressure cooked stew is my favorite).

  4. #14
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    Another technique is a dutch oven. Basically a cast iron pot with a lid, or cast iron covered with ceramic. $60 bucks at target for a 5 qt CastLogic beaut.

    Marinate meat if desired. Then sear in the dutch oven in some kind of grease until browned but not cooked. Add seasonings and a cup or so of stock or water. Put the pot in the oven on 150 degrees and leave for 8-10 hours.

    I love that dutch oven. Very low temperature is the secret here. 150 is perfect if your oven will obey it's dial!

    Robin in Colorado

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by RitaRose View Post
    I found myself totally relating to a post on another thread this morning.

    Then I realized it was my own post from almost a year ago.

    Freaking bots.
    It's a sign of how smart they are that they're quoting you, right?

    On topic: as agreed by the thread, slowcooked meat is the BEST way to cook meat. If it's too tough, cook it for longer (we usually do it for 6-10 hours on low). And it's called stewing steak because of the cut of the animal it comes from. Basically it's the lowest grade cheapest and toughest meat.
    Disclaimer: I eat 'meat and vegetables' ala Primal, although I don't agree with the carb curve. I like Perfect Health Diet and WAPF Lactofermentation a lot.

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  6. #16
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    i love that dutch oven

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dr. Bork Bork View Post
    We give our stew meat a good sear in a pan on the stove, then cook it in the crock pot for at least 6 hours.
    +10!

    I've NEVER had any piece of meat not *fall apart* once Crocked! Plus, with a crock, it is REALLY HARD to overcook anything. As long as there is liquid in the pot, it tenderizes (OK 48 hours I've never had happen however, a 6 hour roast ended up going for 12 and turned out terrific!)

    As all of us have different *STAGES* in our daily lives, here is MY suggestion:

    If you have time the night before or the morning of before work: Build and use a crockpot.

    If you get home and forgot to defrost or build your dinner: Pressure Cooker

    If you get home and have TONS of time to cook: Fuck you I hate you! (smiles)
    Last edited by DeilaMiah; 06-18-2012 at 03:22 PM.
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  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by loneviking View Post
    Second on the pressure cooker. That's the fastest and surest way to tender beef. Usually, but not always, the crockpot works too after several hours.
    Oh sweetie. The crockpot works ALWAYS. I remember the FIRST crockpot meal my grandma made in 1977, a chicken. Although bought to keep her OUT of the kitchen, she spent all day at home, checking *the pot* every 15-30 minutes. What should have been 6 hours became 10 because of the *peeks*.

    I have used, or been in the household of, a crockpot for well over 30 years. There's been NO CUT of meat that didn't get tender while being crocked.

    Seriously. The only way to Frig it up is to forget you have a crockpot going for a couple days.

    Perhaps loneviking should attempt a few more recipes.
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  9. #19
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    I cooked a small grass fed chuck in my crock yesterday for 9 hours and it was a little tougher than usual. I browned it first of course. I did it on low and it should have been melt in the mouth. Can't figure out if it needed less or more time. I'm usually thrilled with the crocked meat, though...

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by KerryK View Post
    I cooked a small grass fed chuck in my crock yesterday for 9 hours and it was a little tougher than usual. I browned it first of course. I did it on low and it should have been melt in the mouth. Can't figure out if it needed less or more time. I'm usually thrilled with the crocked meat, though...
    This could be a variety of things:

    Was it frozen when put in the crock?
    Bigger than usual?
    Good amount of liquid?
    Fat content?

    9 hours and tough sounds under crocked to me. I've always seen tough UNDER crocked but not OVER crocked.
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