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View Poll Results: Do you subscribe to Gary Taubes's alternative hypothesis of obesity?

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  • Yes

    28 40.58%
  • No

    17 24.64%
  • Eh, kinda

    24 34.78%
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Thread: Do you subscribe to Gary Taubes's alternative hypothesis of obesity?

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  1. #1
    Timthetaco's Avatar
    Timthetaco Guest

    Do you subscribe to Gary Taubes's alternative hypothesis of obesity?

    Just curious.

  2. #2
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    It may be one factor in some cases, but that's about it. Plenty of people on this forum disprove his silly overstatements because we lost weight by *increasing* carbs.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Apex Predator View Post
    It may be one factor in some cases, but that's about it.
    Yep. Obesity is a complex, multifactorial problem. Anyone who tries to focus too much of the blame on a single element is probably going to miss other aspects that contribute. The Carb/Insulin Hypothesis, Food Reward, and other hypotheses all have their place, and from individual to individual the relative influence of different factors may vary. I think Taubes' efforts to shine light on an alternative hypothesis to mainstream nutritional dogma definitely have value, but sometimes people take his writing a step or two too far, and completely dismiss other contributing factors to obesity.
    Last edited by jsa23; 06-17-2012 at 07:37 AM.

  4. #4
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    Yes, with the proviso that he's talking to a specific group: those genetically predisposed toward obesity, insulin resistance and diabetes. Carbs were my downfall; attempts at controlling things via low-fat/carb-rich/calorie restrictive diet (with or without exercise) led nowhere; and adjusting my diet along the lines of his carb-insulin hypothesis (and Mark's carbohydrate curve, for that matter) has played out exactly as described in GCBC.

    I understand his approach isn't universally applicable, and if I were a 25-year-old bodybuilder seeking to trim my last few % of BF I'd go a different route...I certainly don't begrudge anyone their sweet potatoes. But as it is, I credit Taubes as much as Sisson for my results (115+ lbs lost and innumerable health issues gone along with them) and often tire of seeing him maligned.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by cantare View Post
    Yes, with the proviso that he's talking to a specific group: those genetically predisposed toward obesity, insulin resistance and diabetes. Carbs were my downfall; attempts at controlling things via low-fat/carb-rich/calorie restrictive diet (with or without exercise) led nowhere; and adjusting my diet along the lines of his carb-insulin hypothesis (and Mark's carbohydrate curve, for that matter) has played out exactly as described in GCBC.

    I understand his approach isn't universally applicable, and if I were a 25-year-old bodybuilder seeking to trim my last few % of BF I'd go a different route...I certainly don't begrudge anyone their sweet potatoes. But as it is, I credit Taubes as much as Sisson for my results (115+ lbs lost and innumerable health issues gone along with them) and often tire of seeing him maligned.
    I fall into that group, yet once I healed my body, carbs ceased being the enemy(and ketosis became very uncomfortable). If it helps people great, but while his intentions are good, he doesn't come close to explaining, let alone treating, the obesity epidemic.

  6. #6
    Paleobird's Avatar
    Paleobird Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by cantare View Post
    Yes, with the proviso that he's talking to a specific group: those genetically predisposed toward obesity, insulin resistance and diabetes. Carbs were my downfall; attempts at controlling things via low-fat/carb-rich/calorie restrictive diet (with or without exercise) led nowhere; and adjusting my diet along the lines of his carb-insulin hypothesis (and Mark's carbohydrate curve, for that matter) has played out exactly as described in GCBC.

    I understand his approach isn't universally applicable, and if I were a 25-year-old bodybuilder seeking to trim my last few % of BF I'd go a different route...I certainly don't begrudge anyone their sweet potatoes. But as it is, I credit Taubes as much as Sisson for my results (115+ lbs lost and innumerable health issues gone along with them) and often tire of seeing him maligned.
    I agree but I would add that one doesn't necessarily have to be genetically pre-disposed. One can become at risk by age, other illness or injury, years of CW eating abusing the body. In my case inactivity due to several surgeries plus a blasted thyroid from chemo equaled weight gain. The low carb diet worked for me when nothing else did. And it has worked for a lot of people. It is not some small subset.

  7. #7
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    Yes I do. Gary Taubes is a great writer and researcher.

    I look at it the way I did teachers and class periods in high school. My first period I had Dr. Atkins, lit a spark. The bell rang and then I went to Mr. Sean Croxton's class, learned how to say "Yo, what's up y'all!" and about a book called "Good calories, bad calories". The bell rang again and I went to Mr. Taubes class, learned a boatload of head scratching scientific stuff. Another bell rang and I went to my locker and let everything I had learned sink in while walking down the hallway.

    Now I'm in Mr. Sisson's class and it's cool, cause I get to go barefoot, play outside and splash in the water like a kid and act like a Neanderthal. Life is good!
    "After all we did for Britain, selling all that corduroy and making it swing, and all we got was a bit of tin on a piece of leather, an MBE." --George Harrison

  8. #8
    Paleobird's Avatar
    Paleobird Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by Bioletti View Post
    Yes I do. Gary Taubes is a great writer and researcher.

    I look at it the way I did teachers and class periods in high school. My first period I had Dr. Atkins, lit a spark. The bell rang and then I went to Mr. Sean Croxton's class, learned how to say "Yo, what's up y'all!" and about a book called "Good calories, bad calories". The bell rang again and I went to Mr. Taubes class, learned a boatload of head scratching scientific stuff. Another bell rang and I went to my locker and let everything I had learned sink in while walking down the hallway.

    Now I'm in Mr. Sisson's class and it's cool, cause I get to go barefoot, play outside and splash in the water like a kid and act like a Neanderthal. Life is good!
    I liked this attitude toward nutrition/fitness/health gurus. Take a little something from each one and keep building on it and integrating it. One guru doesn't have to be vilified and repudiated and the next sanctified. Not all the wisdom in the world is going to come from any one source.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by cantare View Post
    Yes, with the proviso that he's talking to a specific group: those genetically predisposed toward obesity, insulin resistance and diabetes. Carbs were my downfall; attempts at controlling things via low-fat/carb-rich/calorie restrictive diet (with or without exercise) led nowhere; and adjusting my diet along the lines of his carb-insulin hypothesis (and Mark's carbohydrate curve, for that matter) has played out exactly as described in GCBC.

    I understand his approach isn't universally applicable, and if I were a 25-year-old bodybuilder seeking to trim my last few % of BF I'd go a different route...I certainly don't begrudge anyone their sweet potatoes. But as it is, I credit Taubes as much as Sisson for my results (115+ lbs lost and innumerable health issues gone along with them) and often tire of seeing him maligned.
    Same here. I was pre diabetic and only by lowering carbs under 70 grams per day was I able to lose weight. People who are metabolically unimpaired probably have no problem increasing their carb intake, especially if they do serious sports or exercise. However, go to the mall, the majority of the people you see are metabolically damaged and overweight...they are not lean or crossfitters.
    Primal/Paleo is not for everyone, it's for those who have committed to understand.
    READ THE BOOK! ...as Robb Wolf says: "Trying to convince people to save their own ass will burn you out."

    Vegetarians are the enemy of everything good and decent in the human spirit, and an affront to all I stand for -- the pure enjoyment of food. Anthony Bourdain

    and yes, calories DO count my little piggies

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by cantare View Post
    Yes, with the proviso that he's talking to a specific group: those genetically predisposed toward obesity, insulin resistance and diabetes. Carbs were my downfall; attempts at controlling things via low-fat/carb-rich/calorie restrictive diet (with or without exercise) led nowhere; and adjusting my diet along the lines of his carb-insulin hypothesis (and Mark's carbohydrate curve, for that matter) has played out exactly as described in GCBC.

    I understand his approach isn't universally applicable, and if I were a 25-year-old bodybuilder seeking to trim my last few % of BF I'd go a different route...I certainly don't begrudge anyone their sweet potatoes. But as it is, I credit Taubes as much as Sisson for my results (115+ lbs lost and innumerable health issues gone along with them) and often tire of seeing him maligned.
    This is my experience too.
    Female, 5'3", 50, Max squat: 202.5lbs. Max deadlift: 225 x 3.

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