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Thread: Are you paranoid you'll get cancer? page 6

  1. #51
    Paleobird's Avatar
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    Read about the ex pseudo-oncologist here : Cancer=Fungus?? - www.123hjemmeside.dk/cancer_is_not_a_fungus

    This guy is charging insane amounts of money for treatments that are nothing but baking soda and don't work. He is basing all of this on the obvious lie that cancer is a fungus. The problem is people being talked into this kind of woo instead of getting real medical treatment until it too late.

  2. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by patski View Post
    I recently watched a video explaining cancer. While Mr. Italiano is probably wrong, the fact that he found candida in 75% of his cancer patients still freaks me out.

    When you watch your mother die slowly...day in, day out, and finally choke to death on her own vomit: that there...that is real fear. I think I've learned to hide it. But believe me, hiding or not dealing with it has consequences that I'm paying for. Anxiety and depression are just two of them.

    I'm sorry - didn't want to get all emo 'n shit on ya'll. It's been a tough night.
    Oh, patski, {{{{{{hugs}}}}}}}}

    I watched my mom die of a brain tumor. Yes, it sucks.

    The reason there is a large overlap between people with candida and people who get cancer is that the same bad eating habits contribute to both outcomes. Correlation=/=causation.

    Please don't get caught up with snake oil salesmen like that. They sell fear. Don't buy it.

  3. #53
    RitaRose's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paleobird View Post
    The reason there is a large overlap between people with candida and people who get cancer is that the same bad eating habits contribute to both outcomes. Correlation=/=causation.
    I was thinking that too, along with probably having a compromised immune system.

    I got 2 concussions during the past year, and both times I got a fungal infection with a week. I never get them.
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  4. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by patski View Post
    I recently watched a video explaining cancer. While Mr. Italiano is probably wrong, the fact that he found candida in 75% of his cancer patients still freaks me out.

    When you watch your mother die slowly...day in, day out, and finally choke to death on her own vomit: that there...that is real fear. I think I've learned to hide it. But believe me, hiding or not dealing with it has consequences that I'm paying for. Anxiety and depression are just two of them.

    I'm sorry - didn't want to get all emo 'n shit on ya'll. It's been a tough night.
    I'm terribly sorry you went through that, Patski, and I certainly hope I didn't fuel the fire of depression or anxiety with this post. I really hope my stepdad makes a full recovery and that my other family members pull-through, as well. I am the eldest, and most stable in a large family, and I will be the caretaker of both my grandparents and my parents when the time comes. I am trying to steel myself for that inevitable responsibility, You are an admirable woman, and my heart goes out to you.

  5. #55
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    Rasputina, I think this post did stir up some stuff for me (yay for complex grief), but at the same time, it's good for me to know that I'm not the only one with those fears. Patski, I'm so sorry you had to go through that with your mother, and Paleobird too--my mum and her sister both had brain tumours, and they terrify me. I hate cancer.

    Anyhow, I'm glad that other people here get it.
    “If I didn't define myself for myself, I would be crunched into other people's fantasies for me and eaten alive.” --Audre Lorde

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  6. #56
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    paleobird: Thank you for clearing that up for me. And *HUGS* to you too. Thank you.

    Owly: I didn't cope well after losing mom. I was a train wreck. I was on anti-depressants for two years and got off them in December of last year. Now I'm off them, and *now* my depression is worse than ever. I feel like only *now* am I truly dealing with the loss and it's a f*cking brick wall that's fallen on top of me. I also blame the Cipralex for probably making it worse. I'm going through a really bad time right now.

    COMPLEX GRIEF CAN EAT ME.

    Rasputina, my heart goes out to you. If you ever need to vent, I'm here via pm!

    I've been thinking of writing memoirs based on my experiences with Mom as she was dying...
    A Post-Primal PrimalPat

    Do not allow yourself to become wrapped up in a food 'lifestyle'. That is ego, and you are not that.

  7. #57
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    Not anymore since I learned the truth about PUFAs.

  8. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sihana View Post


    This is what I have to look forward to in terms of genetic risk.




    I did not have to watch my family die from cancer, but from something avoidable. I had to watch them die through their own bad habits. My grandfather was born with congestive heart failure, and worsened it by smoking tobacco for many years, only stopping when a much younger version of myself begged him to not to die. He was forced to retire in his early 40's due to his weak heart and lungs. As far as I have been alive, he was slowly dying before my eyes. He died last year, July 8th; I made the decision to take off his life support. He died 2 hours later, at 10:47pm.

    I don't know what I feel after that, to be honest. I had seen him deteriorate slowly before my eyes. I had accepted his death long before he himself did. I had told him that it was okay to go, to pass on. It does not make it hurt less. I was his caregiver, from Jr. high onward, and some times I feel as if I did not do enough to help his final years and passing.

    It still eats at me, and probably always will. I hope no one has to be a caregiver, as it is as Patski says, it wears down upon you, and creates an oozing wound that just refuses to heal fully. A small part of you is taken with the person you care for when they die.
    Oh my god, Sihana. I could not imagine taking someone off life support. You did the right thing. It's enough to be a caregiver, but to have to make that kind of decision. My god... *******HUGS*******

    Being a caregiver actually changes who you are. You can never go back to the person who you were before. It changes your perspective on all of life. You have memories of things you'd rather not. People surprise you, people disgust you. It really is a life-altering event.
    A Post-Primal PrimalPat

    Do not allow yourself to become wrapped up in a food 'lifestyle'. That is ego, and you are not that.

  9. #59
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    Somehow the topic of dying came up yesterday when I was talking to my husband - turns out, he's totally afraid of dying because he always has a feeling that he's not done everything he wants. I can't really understand this, nor can I understand having a fear of dying, which makes me seem kind of like a robot, I guess. I am afraid of having a long and painful, torturous death, or having to watch loved ones go through that, but the actual death part really doesn't seem that scary.

    I might be the only person who really has no desire to live past 60 or 65. I just don't see the point, but maybe I'll feel differently when/if I get to that age. I hope I die well, and not from something like cancer that's slowly eating me away. Sure, I eat healthy and try to take care of myself, but not all contributors of cancer are in my control; there's so much pollution and radiation and who knows what else out there.

    The only thing I think I really couldn't handle is if my husband got cancer, somehow the thought of someone else going through that is worse than thinking of me going through it. If one of us did come down with some kind of fatal illness, I think we'd take all our money and do some crazy stuff so we could go out with a bang. Thoughts like that are comforting to me when i start thinking about my husband dying young.

  10. #60
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    No, based on the family history I am FAR more likely to get (in order):

    1) Diabetes
    2) Chronic neurological disorder (Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, histrionic personality disorder, or multiple-personality disorder) (and, I should note, at least one direct family member has been diagnosed with one or more of these issues: not just a WebMD hypochondria attack)
    Peak weight on Standard American Diet: 316.8 lbs
    Initial Weight When Starting Primal: 275 lbs
    Current weight: 210.8 lbs
    Goal weight: 220 lbs (or less): MISSION ACCOMPLISHED.

    The way "ChooseMyPlate.gov" should have looked:
    ChooseMyPlate

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