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Thread: Are you paranoid you'll get cancer? page 2

  1. #11
    peril's Avatar
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    No. There's a much greater chance I'll die of a vascular event. Although I do intend being at paleobird's 120th birthday party
    Four years Primal with influences from Jaminet & Shanahan and a focus on being anti-inflammatory. Using Primal to treat CVD and prevent stents from blocking free of drugs.

    Eat creatures nose-to-tail (animal, fowl, fish, crustacea, molluscs), a large variety of vegetables (raw, cooked and fermented, including safe starches), dairy (cheese & yoghurt), occasional fruit, cocoa, turmeric & red wine

  2. #12
    Paleobird's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by peril View Post
    No. There's a much greater chance I'll die of a vascular event. Although I do intend being at paleobird's 120th birthday party
    No heart attacks in my hot tub though.

  3. #13
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    First of all, cancer is a disease of civilization as far as we know. Sure, pre-agriculture peoples didn't often live long enough to see cancer happen, but we still don't see any examples of it in their societies. We also now get cancer at younger and younger ages, which would definitely overlap even a 30-year average life expectancy of a hunter-gatherer. Living as a hunter-gatherer by eating, sleeping, exercising, not having long-term stress, getting sunlight, etc are all things that should all but eliminate one's chances of cancer. If you blame cancer on a pollutive effect of our own technology, then you might have a point. I don't see how you could do much about it even if it were the case though. Maybe simply live in more pristine environments?

    Secondly, I find this 'fear of death' very interesting. There's a couple things that seem to be true for me. One, you do not worry about the future when you are living a FULL life. If every aspect of your life is great, you will be living in the moment. Two, I don't feel like death is anything odd or awful at all. It's part of the circle of life. I eat dead things every single day for dinner, and it's only natural that I will return to the ground from which the life within me had sprung. I think the fear of death arises in people that are not living full lives and do not understand the world very well.
    Last edited by wiltondeportes; 06-16-2012 at 02:29 AM.

  4. #14
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    cori93437 is offline Senior Member
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    While I don't have a fear of cancer specifically, or a particular fear of death at all... I do understand it.

    Last year I had a sudden onset episode that landed me in the ER. I lost my ability to speak, move my arms and legs, think clearly, control my bodily functions, time became very warped... It was frightening. There were moments of clarity when it was upsetting because I was thinking "Wait! I'm not done yet..." I didn't want to be separated from my husband, from my son, etc. and I was feeling a sense of loss. But, in other moments, when my brain was really shutting down and I was losing consciousness it was very peaceful... and I thought that it wouldn't be so bad, that it might even feel really good, to just let go. The sternum rubs during the peaceful times were ANNOYING!

    I didn't know it at the time but what I was experiencing was an elevated brain pressure event. My cerebrospinal fluid pressure had gotten so high that it was shutting down some of my bodily function. Not generally a cause of death, but comas do happen from it... and then treatment lowers pressure so that function returns.
    As my pressure slowly lowered and I was more conscious I found a way to tell husband that I loved him with mutilated noises, squeezes of fingers, and a few tears instead of words... I'm not really afraid of death(and I came pretty close to facing it as far as I knew at the time), but I sure as hell am not ready to die. Husband also doesn't live in fear of my death although I'm at a higher risk than most people, but he's not ready to be done with me yet either.

    Just because a person is living an extremely conscious, connected, happy, and FULL life doesn't mean that they don't want to stick around for some more of it. When you have a SO or children I think that this desire increases greatly... circle of life or not. There is simply an intense urge to continue those intimate relationships. This is probably part of the design of things. We really SHOULD want to stick around for those we care the most about IMO.
    When a person has loved ones suffering and passing on all around them in their lives it's very different than a piece of animal flesh on a plate, or the notion of a human you've never met dying. It's pain and mortality made suddenly all too real for many people; death isn't as abstract a concept anymore, it feels tangible and more meaningful. Fear of death is fear of loss... not the loss of LIFE necessarily, but the loss of love and connection to people important to you. Fear of death, especially where difficult diseases such as cancer are concerned, is also a fear of suffering and helplessness. It's not just about being dead.
    I have watched a couple of extended family members die the slow agonizing death of cancer... it is a fearful thing to behold. It cannot easily be managed with dignity or pride in this country.
    “You have your way. I have my way. As for the right way, the correct way, and the only way, it does not exist.”
    ~Friedrich Nietzsche
    And that's why I'm here eating HFLC Primal/Paleo.


  5. #15
    texas.grok's Avatar
    texas.grok is offline Senior Member
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    I have no fear of death and little fear of how I'll die (don't want to burn or drown if I had my druthers). I have a greater fear of not living, of spending my days worrying about a disease and focusing my life around eating/doing things to try and avoid every disease. I'm adopted and have no clue about my biological family so I don't know if a heart attack at 60 may be waiting for me or cancer at 65 based on family history. I worked as a paramedic for almost 20 years and I have a much greater fear of living my final years in a nursing home, put there by a family that doesn't want to take care of me.

    Like the t-shirt says, "Live long, drop dead". That is my plan and I'll be damned if I'll live everyday fearing that day.
    Randal
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    Quote Originally Posted by texas.grok View Post
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  6. #16
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    Please don't think I'm crazy (I'm not, my mom had me tested) but I don't fear dying because I've actually heard from the dead, and even tho I don't want it to happen soon, I look forward to seeing them again, most especially my dad.

    The women on both sides of my fam live to nearly 100, my paternal grandmother died in her sleep 2 wks before her 105th bday, so when my sister developed a glioma brain tumor at 63 yrs old, no one could believe it. She always kept herself a size 8, walked, ate high quality food, was wealthy but drank vodka like it was water.

    Brain surgeon told me sugar will feed a tumor like nothing else, as my sister sat there and had Hershey kisses lined up on the arm of her wheelchair, but she knew it was too late to do anything at that point, lived almost a yr after diagnosis. My 87 yr old mom will never get over it, but I convinced her to make her peace with it unless she desired to leave this earth. Besides, she knows where her daughter is and believes she will certainly see her again.

  7. #17
    texas.grok's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JudyCr View Post
    Please don't think I'm crazy (I'm not, my mom had me tested) but I don't fear dying because I've actually heard from the dead, and even tho I don't want it to happen soon, I look forward to seeing them again, most especially my dad.
    Actually I was hoping for crazy, always looking for kindred spirits. I'm not a Christian (not sure exactly what I am) but I am curious on what is on the other side, just not in a big hurry to find out.

    In some ways, it has been a blessing that I don't know about my biological family's medical history since I don't fear dying at a younger age from something that perhaps struck down a relative young. Given my past, I'm actually kind of surprised to have lived this long, figured I would have already died in an accident from some of the things I have done but so far, so good.

    But living in fear of dying a certain way, IMHO, is not living. While I have always had a healthy skepticism about CW, allopathic medicine, etc, the PB way of life has given me more structure in the way I do things and has steered me towards a path of learning where I'm realizing that things like early deaths due to "natural" causes are avoidable by simply living simple, eating real food, doing a bit of exercise and avoiding poisons (prescription drugs, food additives, etc).

    If I live another 40 years, I'll do everything I can to live each day without fear of how my days ends. I'll live my life to the fullest and refuse to "act my age". Die I will but if at all possible, I'll do it on my terms.
    Randal
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    Quote Originally Posted by texas.grok View Post
    Facebook is to intelligence what a black hole is to light
    http://hardcoremind.com/

  8. #18
    paleo-bunny's Avatar
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    Unfortunately I didn't learn of a family history of cancer on my maternal grandmother's side until after her funeral, when my Mum caught up with my Gran's estranged family. My Gran died of pancreatic cancer. One of her sisters died of lung cancer, and her only brother was committed to a lunatic asylum after their father commited suicide, and was never heard of again. A second cousin survived cancer of the spine aged 11.

    My Mum was very lucky last year as she had colon cancer detected early through the recently introduced NHS screening programme, before she had any symptoms, and her one-year follow-up was clear.

    At least I have good genes from my father's side and there's no cancer. He's been overweight his whole life but muscular and at 64 looks about 50 and has no serious health problems.

    I keep reminding myself that my maternal grandmother's other two sisters are in good health in their late eighties, have never had cancer, and lead very active social lives. Plus, my grandfathers are 94 and 89 and still live in their own homes.

    Although I have focused on eating healthily for a couple of decades now, I believe that a positive attitude counts for a lot and is just as important as lifestyle factors. I also believe that appreciation of art and nature has amazing powers to heal and prolong life, as well as a general enjoyment of life being beneficial for health.
    F 5 ft 3. HW: 196 lbs. Primal SW (May 2011): 182 lbs (42% BF)... W June '12: 160 lbs (29% BF) (UK size 12, US size 8). GW: ~24% BF - have ditched the scales til I fit into a pair of UK size 10 bootcut jeans. Currently aligning towards 'The Perfect Health Diet' having swapped some fat for potatoes.

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paleobird View Post
    Survival is a much stronger motivator than vanity could ever be.
    Really really like this. APPLAUSE for your recovery and integrity in using what you know.

    Rasputina, I am sorry about all the illness in your family. Take good care of yourself (not meaning to lecture). I smoked for 18 years, found it impossible to quit while caregiving but I gradually cut back and then quit completely a few months after DH died and have not smoked in a year. He had been a smoker since his teens, no way to know how much it contributed to the cancer; he was also a very heavy drinker before he was in my life which is a major contributor to cancers in the liver. I hope your husband finds a way to quit that works for him. Best of wishes to you and your family.
    My Primal Journal: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread57034.html

    "...since our orthodox theories have not saved us we may have to readjust them to bring them into harmony with Nature's laws. Nature must be obeyed, not orthodoxy." Weston A. Price

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rasputina View Post
    My husband still smokes, even though his dad died 11 years ago, from lung cancer.
    I'd urge him to try an electronic cigarette (e-cig). I was a 30+ a day smoker for 30 years with no hope of quitting until I bought an e-cig around 4 months ago. I've not had another cigarette since & have no intentions of doing so, mainly because the e-cig means I've had absolutely no cravings. Being able to put something in your mouth & inhale 'smoke' (actually water vapour) makes them so much more effective than any of the traditional nicotine replacement options.

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