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    teach2183's Avatar
    teach2183 is offline Senior Member
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    Whole 30 worth it?

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    Would doing a whole 30 be worth it if I know afterwards I can not afford organic/grass-fed? Also, does anyone know if doing a whole 30 pushes out toxins that could be dangerous for a nursing 2yo?

    I believe I have adrenal fatigue and am in the beginning stages of adding supplements that I know are safe while bfing. I've started with Bcomplex, magnesium, my prenatal vit, and still taking vit D. I'm hoping that doing a whole 30 might help speed my recovery as I'd do it while taking a month to be sure I'm getting optimal rest. But we can not afford to eat organic or grass-fed as our food budget is already >10% of our budget and there is not any money to increase it at this time.

    Thoughts?

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    marthat's Avatar
    marthat is offline Senior Member
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    You can do a Whole30 without resorting to grass-fed, organic stuff. I do. Choosing the best you can afford (maybe local butcher shop meats rather than Whole Foods Organic Blah-blah-blah stuff?) The most important part is what you take out, not so much what you leave in. Eat real meats fish, poultry, eggs, lots of real veggies, moderate fruits, nuts if desired, coconut products for the good fats, EVOO. Canned tuna is a good protein source. Cultivate drinking water or home-made iced teas - super cheap! If you are not buying soda pops, juices, or milk (for yourself, not baby) for a month, you save quite a bit.

    If your child is 2 years old, he/she will be getting lots of nutrients from other foods besides your breastmilk, right? So as long as you're getting enough calories, you shouldn't affect your milk production.

    Good luck with the process if you decide to do it. On the other hand, waiting a few months until baby is done nursing wouldn't hurt either. The Whole30 will always be there.

  3. #3
    teach2183's Avatar
    teach2183 is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by marthat View Post
    You can do a Whole30 without resorting to grass-fed, organic stuff. I do. Choosing the best you can afford (maybe local butcher shop meats rather than Whole Foods Organic Blah-blah-blah stuff?) The most important part is what you take out, not so much what you leave in. Eat real meats fish, poultry, eggs, lots of real veggies, moderate fruits, nuts if desired, coconut products for the good fats, EVOO. Canned tuna is a good protein source. Cultivate drinking water or home-made iced teas - super cheap! If you are not buying soda pops, juices, or milk (for yourself, not baby) for a month, you save quite a bit.

    If your child is 2 years old, he/she will be getting lots of nutrients from other foods besides your breastmilk, right? So as long as you're getting enough calories, you shouldn't affect your milk production.

    Good luck with the process if you decide to do it. On the other hand, waiting a few months until baby is done nursing wouldn't hurt either. The Whole30 will always be there.
    I'm not far from whole 30 already, only drink water so there's no savings to be had at this point. But I thought there were more restrictions than what you mention and that the grass-fed and organic parts were important.

    DS definitely eats plenty of table food, I'm not concerned about milk production but rather toxins that might leave my body and end up the breastmilk and be harmful to him. I don't know when he'll be done, I'm letting him decide and we're down to 1-2x/day right now.

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    In my experience the majority of the health benefits of Primal Nutrition come from eliminating the major offendors of the Standard American Diet. Ditch the refined grains, sugars, and industrial fats (soybean/corn/canola/etc oils, margarine, veg. shortening) and you will reap 80-90% of the potential benefits of Primal.

    When I first started Primal a couple years back I was pretty relaxed about my level of compliance with the plan. At least a couple of times a week I would have some definitely non-primal food like whole-wheat pancakes or oatmeal for breakfast or a Chipotle burrito complete with rice, beans, and giant white flour tortilla. All of the meat I ate and most of the vegetables were typical storebought non-grassfed, non-organic fare. I started a food log, increased my intake of veggies to 4-6 servings per day from about 1-2, ditched almost all processed food (I wasn't eating a tremendous amount of this but I was eating some), dialed back my carb consumption from probably 300-ish grams per day to 80-120 per day, and started getting regular exercise.

    My ~80/20 adherence to the plan yielded good results. I lost 40 lbs and drastically changed my body composition. My blood numbers improved markedly, HDL went from 39 to 60+, Trigs went from 140 to 70-ish, TC dropped slightly from 180 to 172, and although I didn't get a VAP test I'm sure my LDL pattern changed for the better. More importantly, I felt great. I always had energy for whatever I wanted to do, no trouble sleeping or waking up, was rarely sick. All accomplished with less than 100% compliance and no grass-fed anything. I would prefer grass-fed organic everything of course but it just isn't in the cards at the moment, but that hasn't stopped me from realizing a lot of benefit from the basic principles of the Primal lifestyle. Simply eating whole foods that you recognize, avoiding empty calories like bread/pasta, getting enough healthy fats, and getting some exercise will get you 80+% of the way to your goals.

    If your goal is to be bikini-model perfect with an HDL score in the triple digits full-compliance may be necessary. But you can be pretty healthy without having to break the food budget.

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