Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 14

Thread: Are sweet potato skins ok to eat? page

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    97

    Are sweet potato skins ok to eat?

    I know regular potato skins are where the anti-nutrients and stuff are, but i'm pretty sure i've read somwhere that sweet potato skins are harmless but i wanted to make sure.

  2. #2
    Owly's Avatar
    Owly is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    3,823
    Sweet potatoes are not actually from the same family as regular potatoes, and the skins are fine to eat.
    “If I didn't define myself for myself, I would be crunched into other people's fantasies for me and eaten alive.” --Audre Lorde

    Owly's Journal

  3. #3
    acohn's Avatar
    acohn is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    19
    Quote Originally Posted by thepeanutbutterkid View Post
    I know regular potato skins are where the anti-nutrients and stuff are, but i'm pretty sure i've read somwhere that sweet potato skins are harmless but i wanted to make sure.
    Yup, they're fine. But, oddly enough, according to my brief research, they don't appear to add much value to the vegetable/tuber. Most of the potassium in the russet potato, for example, is in the skin, so I was surprised to find no mention of minerals concentrated in the skin of a sweet potato.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    97
    Quote Originally Posted by acohn View Post
    Yup, they're fine. But, oddly enough, according to my brief research, they don't appear to add much value to the vegetable/tuber. Most of the potassium in the russet potato, for example, is in the skin, so I was surprised to find no mention of minerals concentrated in the skin of a sweet potato.
    I wasn't really looking for added nutritional benefit from the skins, i was just looking for confirmation that they were ok to eat so i can be lazy when making mashed sweet potatos and not have to scoop out the flesh and instead just mash the potato skin and all into a bowl after i cook it. saves time and clean up.

  5. #5
    Philmont Scott's Avatar
    Philmont Scott is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Purcellville, VA
    Posts
    25
    "Traditionally, sweet potato and yam skins are removed before consumption, so I err on the side of caution and do the same. I doubt a bit of skin is going to hurt you, though, if you decide to eat it. Most of the anti-nutrients in potatoes can be found in the skin, and it seems logical to assume the same is true for yams and sweet potatoes.

    Read more: The Difference Between Yams and Sweet Potatoes | Mark's Daily Apple
    "

    This was the first thing I ever read that made me wonder whether I should have been eating the skins all along. It hasn't killed me yet, but then neither did the grains I used to eat. (I have only been eating the orange sweet potatoes, not the true yams, or the others.)

  6. #6
    tarek's Avatar
    tarek is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Orlando, Florida
    Posts
    676
    I've eaten the skins once or twice and I felt fine, but I am assuming that the sweet potato plant employs some defense against its roots being eaten, so I would shy away from eating their skins beyond occasionally.

  7. #7
    OneDeltaTenTango's Avatar
    OneDeltaTenTango is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
    Posts
    933
    Quote Originally Posted by tarek View Post
    I've eaten the skins once or twice and I felt fine, but I am assuming that the sweet potato plant employs some defense against its roots being eaten, so I would shy away from eating their skins beyond occasionally.
    This is the same logic that I use. Not based on any science, but my reasoning is that the inside has all of the good stuff stored for the plant and the main job of the skin is to protect the insides from attack by any and all bugs, bacteria, fungi, etc. The skin doesn't seem like an impressive physical barrier, so it makes sense that it would provide somewhat of a chemical barrier. Just speculating.

  8. #8
    Hallucinogen's Avatar
    Hallucinogen is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Ocean
    Posts
    2

    Cool

    Sweet Potatoes and yams have fungi growing almost on every single skin which also indent into the flesh, that fungi is toxic, even if you cook it, the toxins remain, it is strongly advisable to peel them and then simply steam for ~5mins and cooldown, that is their optimal cooking technique,
    besides, you Really do not want to eat the stuff which has been absorbed into the skin from the soil it was grown in, even if they were grown "organically"...
    Last edited by Hallucinogen; 02-17-2014 at 07:53 AM.

  9. #9
    Rueben's Avatar
    Rueben is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Posts
    148
    I'm almost 50. Been eating Sweet potato (Kumara) all my life. With the skins on.

    Delicious- especially when you roast them and the skins go all crunchy and almost burnt...

  10. #10
    Hallucinogen's Avatar
    Hallucinogen is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Ocean
    Posts
    2

    Cool

    Primal Blueprint Expert Certification
    Quote Originally Posted by Rueben View Post
    I'm almost 50. Been eating Sweet potato (Kumara) all my life. With the skins on.

    Delicious- especially when you roast them and the skins go all crunchy and almost burnt...
    Yeah, i'm sure if your burn it enough then the skins REALLY Add the health benefits ! And fungi ? What fungi !
    Make sure to use a flamethrower next time

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •