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Thread: Seaweed! page

  1. #1
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    Seaweed!

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    Last edited by secret agent girl; 12-25-2014 at 05:51 AM.

  2. #2
    Nibbler's Avatar
    Nibbler is offline Senior Member
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    I buy Tao Kae Noi original crispy seaweed from the asian section in my university student union shop for snacking on campus, but you can also just buy toasted Nori sheets (for sushi) from regular supermarkets and eat that out of the packet. No preparation required. Very good as a salty snack when wrestling with biochemistry problems.
    You can buy other dried stuff that needs soaking too, all sorts, I think you just rehydrate by pouring over hot water and leaving to soak, then drain and chuck it in soup and stirfries, but you can just crumble those nori sheets over soup and stirfries too. I'm lazy

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    Crabbcakes's Avatar
    Crabbcakes is offline Senior Member
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    Here are some of our family favorites (all come from any Asian grocer):

    wakame - we buy it dehydrated and chopped in bags. A sprinkle goes in at the dinner table in clear broth based soups (or cups of just clear, flavorful broth), only takes a minute to uncurl and warm in piping hot broth. Deeeep green (one of my favorite colors) and curled up.

    toasted, seasoned nori sheets - my kids eat these like candy. they recently turned to just toasted nori sheets because there wasn't any seasoned in the house and ate those up. Black, crinkly sheets close to the size of printer paper. There are toasted, seasoned nori snacks that are cut into much smaller, uniform pieces and individually wrapped but these are much more expensive than just a big 'ole package destined for sushi wrapping

    nori komi furikake - a sesame seed and nori seaweed seasoned food sprinkle in a glass jar that is salty and yummy

    kombu - long, thick slate-green seaweed strip sometimes to be found cut into sections instead of 8-inch-long or so pieces. We used this as an addition to bean soup, right in the pot with the beans and water at the beginning. It usually dissolves completely. I know beans ain't Primal, but you might be transitioning, or have others to feed like I do who aren't Primal

    seaweed salad - get this fresh from any sushi vendor or ask for their fresh salad from the asian grocer. translucent, various shades of green. I am addicted to this salad!! My grocer makes it with a little more hot pepper flake than the sushi vendors, just in case you are sensitive to heat and need to know that it varies

  4. #4
    Lily Marie's Avatar
    Lily Marie is offline Senior Member
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    Nori is freshwater algae, I believe. Not actual seaweed - unless you mean "Water plants" instead of "Ocean plants".

  5. #5
    spughy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lily Marie View Post
    Nori is freshwater algae, I believe. Not actual seaweed - unless you mean "Water plants" instead of "Ocean plants".
    Nope, it's seaweed.

  6. #6
    fiercehunter's Avatar
    fiercehunter is offline Banned
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    It's kind of expensive, have never used much & now think it's too high in iodine.

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    Lily Marie's Avatar
    Lily Marie is offline Senior Member
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    Ah, thanks for the correction Spughy.
    I guess it was the algae part that was different. I wonder why it doesn't stay salty like other dried ocean plants?

  8. #8
    spughy's Avatar
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    The salt level can be adjusted by soaking any seaweed in fresh water. Nori usually has some residual salt - it would have scarcely any flavour if it didn't.

  9. #9
    anadolis's Avatar
    anadolis is offline Junior Member
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    One of my favorite (relatively) quick dishes is a hijiki-wakame salad.

    Soak about 2 tbsp of each (combined) in about 1.5 cups of boiled water for 10-15 min. Strain off excess water, and season with apple cider vinegar, soy sauce/tamari, fresh grated ginger, and maybe a bit of black pepper or cayenne if the mood strikes.

    You can also stir-fry soaked hijiki with leafy greens (such as beet greens, spinach, chard, etc), along with some minced garlic and ginger (salted to taste, of course).

    =)

  10. #10
    dragonjax's Avatar
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    I purchased a box of nori sheets today. Broke one sheet up into small pieces and added it to my salad.

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