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Thread: "There's a Huuuuge Adult" AKA Kids say the darndest things page

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    DashFire's Avatar
    DashFire is offline Senior Member
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    "There's a Huuuuge Adult" AKA Kids say the darndest things

    Primal Fuel
    So on Day 1 of going primal last week, I'm grocery shopping, walk past an aisle and hear a kid in awe say to his mother...

    "Wow mommy, I saw someone bigger than you." Keep in mind his mother was fit and somewhat petite. Most people are bigger than her. She responds "did you?"

    The kid replies, "He was an adult. A huuuuge adult." At this point I'm in the next aisle, and the mother, kindly, probably knowing I heard that, tries to negate the damage with "well honey, some adults ARE tall, like daddy."

    Ahhh, kids. At 6', 340# I'm both tall and huge. Wasn't at all offended, but I can assure you I'll remember that little kid and his comment for a long time and use it as a motivating reminder down the road.

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    JennaRose's Avatar
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    lol that kid was a bit more delicate than I as a toddler pointing at a fat man and saying WOW MOMMY LOOK AT THAT FAT MAN!

    I've also recently gotten that back at me. A 4 year old i was watching just looked at me and said "you're fat". and I said "I'm fat?" and she looked away and said "...no....." but, I really am fat lol not offended, she was simply making an observation

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    Bosnic's Avatar
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    You know what, we need to be more open about what we think of people. Like kids. No more of this constantly making sure you're not offending anyone. The more people hear criticism, the better they learn to handle it. And not just criticism, but compliments too.

    So long as the criticism isn't coming from motivation to insult someone, it's fine. Kids don't mean to insult anyone when they make observations, and that's what makes it wonderful. You know then that it's an honest observation.

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    HUUUUUUUUUUUUGE ADULT

    LOL!

    I would have fallen over, tears in my eyes. Kids are hysterically honest and observant.
    A Post-Primal PrimalPat

    Do not allow yourself to become wrapped up in a food 'lifestyle'. That is ego, and you are not that.

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    magicmerl's Avatar
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    Kids are awesome. They always tell it like it is.

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    zoebird's Avatar
    zoebird is offline Senior Member
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    So funny.

    DS tells people "You are less wide now." Or, what happened the other night "In this picture, you were not as wide as you are now."

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    Zanna's Avatar
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    hahaha, my two sons noticed that I've lost about 40lbs in the last year . . . I explained to them why I was no longer eating bread, grains etc. They called it a diet but I told them it was a lifestyle change, not a diet. My 12 yo son said "yeah, you did get fat for a while - you probably feel better now." True enough . . so I asked him and my 10 yo son why they didn't say anything when I was ballooning in weight - they both just stopped and stared at me like it was the dumbest question ever. Older son raises his eyebrows and says "seriously, Mom? You wanted me to tell you that you were getting fat? Like that would have gone over well." Younger son pipes in with "Fat people being cheery is a myth unless they're Santa. And I wouldn't tell him HE was fat either cause I like getting good presents for Christmas."

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    Saoirse's Avatar
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    when my oldest son was a little over three, we saw a very wide woman at the grocery store, and of course my son had to exclaim "wow mom! she has a really big butt! do you think she can fit through a door?" i tried to shush him, thankfully she was quite a way away, and hopefully didn't hear him. we later had a discussion about not saying things about other people's bodies because it can be hurtful. never lie, but some comments are better left unsaid.

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    I try hard to teach my nieces that we should never talk about other peoples bodies - we can't always help what we think or feel, but we can refrain from commenting. It just leads to so many hurt feelings.

    But I have some very dear friends, who I love and adore, who point out overweight people to their children and then tell the kids we don't eat soda or fast food because we don't want to become fat. It drives me insane. They view it as an important way to educate their children about food choices. I really see it as teaching their kids to dislike overweight people.
    Using low lectin/nightshade free primal to control autoimmune arthritis. (And lost 50 lbs along the way )

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    The challenge of different diets/ foods such as fast foods is a tough one. We tell DS that those foods are "not healthy" and then he exclaims. "He's eating McDonald's! that's not healthy!" And so we have tried to pass along that it's ok for people to make their own choices about food, and they may nto agree that something is healthy/unhealthy. And, we don't want to upset people.

    Same about bodies. He usually compliments people. "You look great, not as wide." Or "you are so beautiful, i love how wide you are." Wide is such an interesting word for him to latch onto.

    We do our best, I guess.

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