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Thread: Okay, seriously, what do I feed my picky toddler? page 4

  1. #31
    Ethereal's Avatar
    Ethereal is offline Junior Member
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    Primal Fuel
    Tercio Whilst I agree about feeding kids what you eat and I have never seen a cat skeleton in a tree LOL I think fussy eating is something to be mindful off as a 'possible' precursor for other health issues. As this is a primal forum I imagine that all of us know the health problems that can arise from a diet full of grains. Fussy eating is a very early sign of GAPS which if anyone has read the book brings to light severe problems like autism. Sure lots of kids just don't like some foods and I'm not suggesting that all fussy kids have GAPS or any other health issues for that matter, I'm just saying that the amount of grains in the diet is something to be mindful off especially if other symptoms start to arise like fussy eating. The reason I am focusing on grains is because kids (or adults) with underlying health issues seem to be fussy and crave grains and sweet foods.
    "You can either spend your time & money on being sick, or you can spend your time & money on being healthy"

  2. #32
    PHaselow's Avatar
    PHaselow is offline Senior Member
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    I agree with the 'SHE WILL NOT STARVE" advice. It might take 20 times of having one bite of a new food on her plate before she tries it. She will try it. If she is like my son (Autism spectrum), she might gag. The typical child *will* eat.

    I love the fact that you are starting her out as a toddler. It gets much harder as they grow older and have outside influence (ie: friends and school lunches). I am trying to switch over my 16, 14 and 11 year old kids to a healthier way of eating and it is brutal. I will admit I cave and go back to their grilled cheese/pizza/mac n cheese at times. I make my own chicken 'nuggets'. Tonight I am trying chicken tenders wrapped in bacon and brushed with coconut nectar/mustard sauce (bake at 400). We'll see! It is the main dishes I struggle with; not the fruits and veggies (I've never used sauces or sweeteners).

    Awesome advice from one (or more) member: taking pieces of meat out of a curry before you add the spices.

    Have her help you. Will she enjoy that? If you want to cater to her a bit, buy some fun plates for her.

    I get the working mom thing even though I stay at home. It makes it extra tough. For that reason, keep extra pieces of meat separate from your elaborate dishes for easy reheat.

    i might have to try that ELaD book!

    Age 48
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    GOAL: to live to be a healthy and active 100


    "In health there is freedom. Health is the first of all liberties."
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  3. #33
    liza's Avatar
    liza is offline Senior Member
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    I'm forever grateful to my parents who did not insist that I eat foods I did not want to eat. I never liked bread, or pasta, or pizza. I loved meats, fruits, most vegetables. Olives and pickles delighted me. I was allowed to eat the foods I liked (always had to taste foods, but wasn't forced to eat what I didn't like).

    i'm an old lady now, who has never been overwieght, takes no medications, and is healthy and vital. I raised my kids the same way, and it worked for them too.

    N=1, of course.

  4. #34
    jennylou's Avatar
    jennylou is offline Junior Member
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    I've been very lucky with my kids. I attribute my luckiness to several factors:

    Baby led weaning - we did very minimal purees with any of my kids. The youngest had the most and that was only b/c she has allergies and it was the easiest thing to do with the sitter. That said, I bought the chunkiest ones, and not the total purees. At home, she only had what we were eating (appropriately sized for her). They got used to what we were eating at a very early age, before they could say yuck, they were eating it.

    Breastfeed well into toddlerhood. My oldest nursed until she was 2.5 and I weaned her (I couldn't take the biting any more). My middle child until right around 3 and the youngest is still going strong at 18 months. The flavors we eat transfer to your breastmilk, it's not bland like formula is always the same.

    Not make meals a battle. You don't want to eat, I'll put it away in case you get hungry.

    Don't run a restaurant. Very rarely I make something for my kids that I don't make for us. Usually if they're getting a meal I'm not eating it's because I won't be there.

    That's not to say that there has been no pickiness. My oldest decided she didn't like curry about six months ago. We eat it several times per month. I started picking out the meat ahead and giving her chicken and rice. Then one day she ate it and liked it again. Just keep offering it. She also doesn't like mushrooms or onions. But she eats them all the time because we cut them up small now.

    Tonight, all three of mine turned their noses up at my squash. So did their dad, I blame him. lol. But they ate the pork chops and they ate the mashed potato (with lots of butter for the older two, the youngest can't have dairy). You win some, you lose some.

  5. #35
    Tesen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jennylou View Post

    Breastfeed well into toddlerhood. My oldest nursed until she was 2.5 and I weaned her (I couldn't take the biting any more). My middle child until right around 3 and the youngest is still going strong at 18 months. The flavors we eat transfer to your breastmilk, it's not bland like formula is always the same.
    My wife breast fed our son to just around 2.5 - what we learned in that time is us eating curry was not a great idea talk about the attack of the toddler gas! ;-)

    My son is on the semi-SAD diet, but I just ordered eat like a Dino and I am hopeful I can start to transition him over. He is REALLY a picky eater; he has a severe speech delay and behavioral problems from it. Funny enough, as I get him close to primal/paleo eating lifestyle his behavior improves (go figure right?) and he is making progress with his speech (he is 4 now). I honestly believe that the food they eat that young 100 percent affects their growth and development.

    It is going to be a battle since we have waited so long and he is a VERY stubborn child so this is going to be a mission but I am hopeful it will help him.

    Tes

  6. #36
    JoanieL's Avatar
    JoanieL is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by liza View Post
    I'm forever grateful to my parents who did not insist that I eat foods I did not want to eat. I never liked bread, or pasta, or pizza. I loved meats, fruits, most vegetables. Olives and pickles delighted me. I was allowed to eat the foods I liked (always had to taste foods, but wasn't forced to eat what I didn't like).

    i'm an old lady now, who has never been overwieght, takes no medications, and is healthy and vital. I raised my kids the same way, and it worked for them too.

    N=1, of course.
    You are lucky. Children forced to clean their plates or eat a food they find distasteful in order to get dessert will indeed learn to eat food they don't like in order to get the food they like - just like training any animal. In later life it will be hard for them to unlearn this behavior and they'll likely have some food issues even if they manage to be thin.

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