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Thread: Okay, seriously, what do I feed my picky toddler? page 2

  1. #11
    CaveMama's Avatar
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    Thanks everyone
    Sandra, awesome response. I know that's all true, I just have very little energy and patience to wait out marathon hunger strikes/fits. She has it in her to cry for hours so I "pick my battles" and I need to fight the food battle a little harder.

  2. #12
    billp's Avatar
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    Remember children need much more carb heavy food than an adult. Sugars and starches. That's because they are growing. Also small children have a very small gut and generally cannot handle high fiber foods and find them repellent. High fiber veg is more of an adult thing.

    I offer meat but don't worry when it is often not taken up. I always make butter and animal fats (chicken skin, cooked meat fat etc.) available, and it gets eaten quite a lot. I find rice is an excellent filler, not being wheat based but still starchy. For whatever reason mine refuse to eat root veg cooked, only eating carrots raw. I was the same as a child.

    I do offer good quality ice cream that has no HFCS or veg oil. When bread and pasta are demanded I let them have it, but I offer other stuff first. Eggs seems to be very popular, and filling up on eggs takes the pressure off the pasta, which I consider to be junk food.

    I do not attempt to force me will on my children regarding food. When I have a preference I merely fail to buy what I don't want it and offer what I do want them to eat.

  3. #13
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    Sometimes children can be such pains in the ___. I am with you and dread the fight. Last night DD would not TOUCH her burger (she did take one piece and picked the cheese off of it, so maybe if there was no cheese), but I also remember she tried to take her food to the living room and I wouldn't let her and after that she would not touch the burger (she's 2). Instead she had a lunchable for dinner (ik, ick... but she ate).

    I think we'll do tacos tonight. The kids like tacos a lot. DD eats just the meat. DS eats the meat, cheese and lettuce on a corn shell. That meal seems to make them happy.
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  4. #14
    Dr. Bork Bork's Avatar
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    Grace gets her choice of breakfast and lunch. Dinner time I make 2 eating options available: Take it, or go to bed. Breakfast she'll often have fruit, or eggs & bacon, or cheese, or lunch meat. Lunch is usually cheese, lunch meat, gluten free chicken nuggets. Sometimes yogurt. She loves her raw milk. Dinner is whatever we're having.

    Make 2 options available in your home at all times: Eat it or go hungry. After they've come to accept this rule, you can let them start picking what they eat. Just make sure they finish what they picked before picking something else.
    --Trish (Bork)
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  5. #15
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    I think you have gotten a lot of good helpful advice hear. I want to reiterate the suggestion to not have stuff in the house that you don't want her to eat. aka just don't have mac and cheese, lunchables, etc. I have found over the years it is much easier (for the kids, AND for me) to not eat crap if I never buy it to bring home. then if we are out and about and they want something that isn't in our regular diet I feel fine with letting them. But it's just never an option at home. The treats I do buy are cheese and corn tortillas, full fat real ice cream, and....fruit leather, lara bars (but packaged treats are only for outings or school. Never instead of real food at home)

    My rule of thumb with feeding kids (all picky in their own ways, at different times) was 1-this is what mom made for dinner. I put a tiny portion of each thing on the plate, like 2-3 bites each thing. That is the first thing they eat. 2-when that's done you may get more, or make something else for yourself (this is when they are old enough to actually make something. When they are tiny I'll make something for them after they eat what's on the plate). I urge them to snack on veggies or meat or a glass of whole raw milk if they are hungry before dinner and then if they aren't hungry at dinner I really don't care.
    This stuff only works if you only have great options at home and no crap. And all those countless meals of eating one or two bites of new, unloved items builds up to proper tastebuds eventually. I promise, for reals.

  6. #16
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    Oh, also, my youngest, who is 5, is a proper arguing, fighting, wailing warrior. It's a knock down, drag out death match getting decent food in him sometimes, especially because the hungrier he gets the more unreasonable he gets. I truly understand wanting to avoid the fight. But it really gets better the better the food going into them is. Well fed kids have more resources to draw upon to be more balanced and calm. I've seen it in my own children and others.

  7. #17
    icz's Avatar
    icz
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    Quote Originally Posted by billp View Post
    Remember children need much more carb heavy food than an adult. Sugars and starches. That's because they are growing. Also small children have a very small gut and generally cannot handle high fiber foods and find them repellent. High fiber veg is more of an adult thing.
    Lord, try convincing people of that around here. I am going around and around on another thread when the OP was asking how to help her "skeletal" kids gain weight.

    I don't believe in imposing food philosophies on kids. I always make sure my son has adequate complex carbs with his meals - he is growing.

    Also, there are biological reasons kids don't like veggies. It is developmentally normal between the ages of 2 and perhaps 10 even to eschew anything novel. Feed kids whole, healthy foods and don't push your food agendas on them.

  8. #18
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    Lots of good advice here. The phrase we got from a very good parenting book was "20 yucks to 1 yum". As in, expect kids to turn their nose up to a new food 20 times in a row before they will like it.

    We feed out kids the same thing we eat (with the exception of breakfast, where they get ricies or porridge with milk, cream and yoghurt on top). We eat a wide variety of vegetables, and dish the same proportions up to everybody. We have a rule that you have to try everything at every meal, but you only have to have one bit. For example, our two girls have decided that they don't like mushrooms at the moment, so after eating one piece of mushroom, they are allowed to pick out all of the rest of the mushroom on their plate and put them on our plate. That way they get a consistent exposure to foods they claim they don't like, and you know what? In a couple of years they don't mind them.

    Some other parents that eat with us are amazed at the range of veggies our kids eat, but I think that consistently giving them small doses to them is the way to go.

  9. #19
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    icz
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    Quote Originally Posted by magicmerl View Post
    For example, our two girls have decided that they don't like mushrooms at the moment, so after eating one piece of mushroom, they are allowed to pick out all of the rest of the mushroom on their plate and put them on our plate.
    My son has taken mushrooms one step farther, he says he can "taste where the mushroom has been" on the plate. He profoundly dislikes them.

    We, too, put everything on his plate, and require a taste. I think we are over the 20 times rule on some things, but kids really have to be exposed a lot to even begin to like some things. I have read that neophobia is actually developmentally normal.

  10. #20
    billp's Avatar
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    I got that with brisket yesterday - "I don't liiiiike"

    I think things being slightly burnt is very off-putting to children. They never like the bread crust either. She even turned down a piece of fat because it was browned, like the rest of the brisket. Last time I leave it cooking in the slow cooker for 24 hours. Next time it will go on first thing in the morning for that evening, instead.

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