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Thread: Am I on the right track? page

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    Alphess's Avatar
    Alphess is offline Junior Member
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    Am I on the right track?

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    Hey there! So I'm currently into the paleo life style, while training with Insanity six days a week and weight training four days a week. I'm trying to lower body fat from 19-21% to 12-14%, for various reasons... I'm doing this, and would like to lower my carbohydrates to below eighty, perhaps below fifty, to encourage fat mobilization while keeping my calories at about 900-1400 (some days I just don't feel hungry).. And maybe throw in fasting about twice a week.
    I'm asking if anyone has tried this sort of approach, and what your success rate / recommendations for it are? Since I'm not dipping down into ultra low carbs, do I need a refeed every two weeks or so, or no?
    "...there was about him a suggestion of lurking ferocity, as though the Wild still lingered in him and the wolf in him merely slept." - Jack London, "White Fang"

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    jakey's Avatar
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    okay, let me get this... "insanity" (whatever that is, it doesn't even claim to be a reasonable approach) six days a week, and weight training four days a week? say goodbye to progress. you will not recover adequately.

    then on top of that you're going to restrict calories to 900-1400? and drive yourself into ketosis without carbohydrates?

    and you're going to fast?

    this is a giant recipe for FAIL. i don't blame you, i just wish people would not go to these insane lengths. just eat a bit more sensibly and be patient.

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    Alphess's Avatar
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    High intensity cardio with some body weight resistance, basically.

    I don't purposefully "restrict" to such... just at the end of the day I add it all up so I know what I'm doing and it just equals out that way. My appetite goes through month or so long phases where it plummets to the point where food makes me feel nauseated. I feel full all the time even if I haven't eaten.
    No, more carbs than are allowed on a traditional KD. Just lower. I've found myself to have poor insulin sensitivity; I over secrete a bit and feel better on lower carbs anyway.
    Fasting I just threw in because I know of the metabolic benefits and have heard it's a good idea.

    My issue is, I get anxious about my nutrition. My exercise I manage fine, it's just... I'm so ultra paranoid about having nutrition adequate to my goals. I'm afraid of overestimating and when I feel like I'm underestimating it's what feels right, which is what is puzzling, because my BMR is low (1200-1400 max range; most average it at about 1350) but combined with my activity factor it's about 1900-2000 for maintenance, but dropping to say 1500-1600 feels too much. I'm training my ass off, and I love it, but I'll be damned if I screw up my progress because I got confused and ate too much and got 80% of what is needed to run a recomp wrong.
    The fact that everyone has different suggestions is frustrating, and what seems to be the highest recommendations simply don't allow for interval training like I'm doing. I'll give up my weights before I give up the amount of effort I've put into Insanity so far, given that it provide bodyweight resistance training as well and therefore won't neglect muscles in favor of "chronic cardio".
    "...there was about him a suggestion of lurking ferocity, as though the Wild still lingered in him and the wolf in him merely slept." - Jack London, "White Fang"

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    jakey's Avatar
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    okay.

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    ryan54's Avatar
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    Insanity 6x and lifting 4x a week is a lot. I don't know anything about Insanity to be honest, but you need to give your body time to rest and recover. I understand you'd like to see progress as quick as possible, but sometimes more is less. Overdoing it isn't good either.

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    Ounce's Avatar
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    Sometimes, you just have to be your own lab rat. Build your boundaries, then execute well thought out plan based on your research. Then report back to us with your results. I would only add patience to your plan.
    Oz
    Running for mediocrity since 2003

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    Wanderlust's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jakey View Post
    okay, let me get this... "insanity" (whatever that is, it doesn't even claim to be a reasonable approach) six days a week, and weight training four days a week? say goodbye to progress. you will not recover adequately.

    then on top of that you're going to restrict calories to 900-1400? and drive yourself into ketosis without carbohydrates?

    and you're going to fast?

    this is a giant recipe for FAIL. i don't blame you, i just wish people would not go to these insane lengths. just eat a bit more sensibly and be patient.
    Best advice you're going to get.

    Lifting more than about 3x a week is dumb. 900-1400kcal are you small flightless bird? Or a Primal Grokette?

    I know, I know I'm an @$$h0l#. But really eating and resting are every bit as important as working out.
    "Go For Broke"
    Fat Kine-230/24% @ 6'2"
    Small Kine-168/9%
    Now- 200/8%
    Goal- 210/6%

  8. #8
    Kingofturtles's Avatar
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    doing insanity 1x a week is too much. its a completely useless workout routine.not to mention, working out 10 times a week is muscle death.

    Insanity:
    Volume

    These programs include almost an hour of exercise plus an additional and completely unnecessary fifteen minutes or so of abdominal work a few days a week. These programs have you doing way too many exercises and sets. Unless you’re taking steroids this is overtraining, and even if you are this volume of exercise is completely unnecessary and counterproductive. With proper training and diet you could achieve the same or better results with less than one hour of training per week, and in some cases less than thirty minutes.

    Speaking of which, the results you see in the testimonials have everything to do with the diet and almost nothing to do with the idiotic training program. I’ve had men lose over 30 pounds of fat and women around 20 with less total training time over a period of two months than the P90X or Insanity programs require in a single week.

    What you should be doing instead: One hard set of only one or two exercises per muscle group, working out no more than three non-consecutive days per week. Advanced trainees should do less, rather than more exercise.

    “Muscle Confusion”

    The concept of ”muscle confusion” is nonsense based on a misunderstanding of motor learning principles. Muscles do not become resistant to stimulation from a particular exercise, they only appear to because improvements are faster initially due to neural adaptations and slow down after around six to eight weeks when adaptation starts to be more due to hypertrophy. Changing exercises too frequently is a huge mistake. I’ve already addressed this in detail in The Ultimate Routine.

    What you should be doing instead: Don’t constantly vary your workouts. Consistently follow a well designed workout or routine that effectively works all the major muscle groups and focus on getting as strong as possible on that. If you plateau it’s more likely you need a reduction in workout volume or more recovery time between workouts and not to “confuse” your muscles by changing exercises.

    Abdominal or “Core” Workouts

    Fifteen minutes of abdominal work is neither necessary nor beneficial. One or two exercises for the abdominal muscles, a flexion and a rotation or lateral flexion movement are all that is required. Maybe four, if you’re doing an occasional abdominal specialization workout, but even this should only take a few minutes to complete, and the reason for doing so is to strengthen the muscles, not to improve abdominal definition. Getting ripped abs is almost entirely a matter of diet and has very little to do with abdominal exercises or workouts.

    What you should be doing instead: Only one hard set of only one or two abdominal exercises at the end of your workout, which should take no more than one to three minutes. If you want ripped abs you need to focus on your diet.

    Plyometrics

    Plyometrics are incredibly stupid. They are relatively ineffective for building strength, unnecessary for developing speed or explosiveness or improving rate of force development, and carry a very high risk of injury. They have no place in any training program.

    What you should be doing instead: If you want to develop speed or explosiveness simply focus on getting stronger. All these different things are expressions of strength, rather than different types as some people believe. You don’t need to train one way for “maximum strength”, another for “speed strength” another for “explosive strength” or any of the other types these people come up with to make their programs more complex and scientific sounding than they need to be.

    Cardio

    Cardio is included in these programs with the claim it is beneficial for both fat burning and cardiovascular conditioning, however it is very inefficient for fat burning and unnecessary for cardiovascular and metabolic conditioning if you’re already performing a proper high intensity strength training program. Additionally, the high impact and repetitive nature of the movements is more likely to cause injuries and contribute to joint problems in the long run, unlike high intensity strength training which is much safer for the joints when performed properly.

    What you should be doing instead: If you want to become leaner you don’t need extra activity to burn calories – which is generally a very inefficient waste of time – you need to eat fewer calories and consume a diet which creates a hormonal situation conducive to fat loss. If you want to improve cardiovascular and metabolic conditioning, high intensity strength training will do that, and you can emphasize it further by limiting rest between exercises.

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