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Thread: How to fatten up my children?!? page 5

  1. #41
    Saoirse's Avatar
    Saoirse is offline Senior Member
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    yeah, but you lump us all together. as i said, i've been attacked because i let my kids have sugar once in a while. there's no need for an underweight kid to have gluten-containing foods. primal-baked goods (made with rice, almond, coconut flours) are more "fattening" and reduce the risk of causing gut issues (which could make the weight issue worse). my "bulk up muscle" comment was because a chubby kid with a low lean body mass is not healthy. kids need a high lean body mass plus a decent amount of fat to be healthy. the muscles make kid activities more fun because they have to exert less effort at them, and the fat+muscle is in case if the child becomes sick and doesn't eat for a period of time. last fall, my daughter was feverish and unable to eat for 4 days. i finally took her in to the ER when she started to hallucinate, and they said there was nothing they could do for her except give her an antiviral med and something that would force her stomach to keep the food down. i didn't think that was wise, so we declined, but i was very glad that had a bit of muscle and fat on her bones to sustain her through that. she lost a little weight, but quickly gained it back after she was well.

    anyway, i didn't see anyone suggesting that the kid should be restricted from carbs or calories at all, so your comment seemed to be kind of reactionary. potatoes and primal baked goods will do just as good of a job bulking a kid up as anything wheat-based, while also avoiding the potential for wheat-related gut issues that could potentially make the low-weight worse.

  2. #42
    magicmerl's Avatar
    magicmerl is online now Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by icz View Post
    I think it might behoove some folks to look at the posters original question - -how to promote weight gain in a kid. I am not confusing the issue - I think the issue is most of us are thinking about what is healthy for us, and not for underweight kids.
    Yes, but the OP said this:
    They eat rice/potatoes at least once a day. Lots of fruit and veggies. Meat at least 2 meals/day.
    That diet looks great to me. There's no major flaws. They are already getting a good whack of carbs, and enough meat (protein). The OP says they don't need more fat, that they get PLENTY.

    There's really only three possible 'solutions' to the OP's dilemma:
    1. The kids are already getting enough calories and don't need more
    2. The kids could get more calories from carbohydrates
    3. The kids could get more calories from fat

    I still think that either (1) or (3) are most likely to be the 'correct' solution to the OP's problem. Although I can see why you reached (2), since that's the natural conclusion to the way the OP is phrased.
    Last edited by magicmerl; 06-06-2012 at 08:23 PM.

  3. #43
    icz's Avatar
    icz
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    I appreciate your responses, and apologize for my over-zealous choice of words in a couple of cases. I guess it comes down to my belief that there is not one right way to eat. . . While I can get on board with primal eating as an adult, and think it would solve many of the world's ills, when I see a person asking what to do about their "skeletal" kids and everyone else is responding "Oh, it is everyone else. . .the norm is skewed," etc. i wonder how responsible that is? It shouldn't come as a surprise that there are people here with food issues, and how do we know if someone is just pushing their issues on their kids and the kids are suffering for it? The tone of the post worried me, and i thought I'd at least be an alternate voice.

    But back to the issue at hand, I do honestly think the list of "safe starches" is pretty limited for kids. I mean, taro and tapioca? Many of those things, including potatoes, have serious texture issues for palate-sensitive kids. I also don't think we can all assume that gluten is bad for everyone, uniformly. Ideal? Maybe not. But we are adults who can eat to our "ideal," and not underweight children. I guess that is just my opinion.

    If one's kids are thriving on a primal diet, more power to them. . . Really! But, it didn't sound like that was the case for the OP.

  4. #44
    magicmerl's Avatar
    magicmerl is online now Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by icz View Post
    If one's kids are thriving on a primal diet, more power to them. . . Really! But, it didn't sound like that was the case for the OP.
    Yeah, you're right.

    Our kids are thriving on primal, so it's a little hard for us to give advice that is greatly different from 'do the things we do with our kids'.

    Getting off topic, we have friends who have a little 5yo boy who is very little. His parents are little, but he is small even for his family. Our 2yo boy (who is big for his age) is taller and bigger than this 5yo. His parents are worried about how much he eats and carry white bread sandwiches and potato chips around for him to eat all the time (they are also firm adherents to CW). It's hard for me to give advice on this thread without having this boy in the back of my mind as I type.

    Edit: Of course, it's also possible that you might be reading more into a single word (skeletal) than is there.
    Last edited by magicmerl; 06-06-2012 at 10:27 PM.

  5. #45
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    you are really prone to hyperbole, icz.

    "everyone else" was not saying that the numbers are skewed, etc. A couple of people mentioned that difference, not "everyone else."

    most of us asserted that it would be good for the child to have more complex carbohydrates/starches, that it would be good to go higher-fat as well (which is most nutrient dense).

    What you have failed to explain is why wheat is the better choice. You simply assert -- over and over -- that restriction is the problem, not that choosing this food source will create healthy, appropriate weight gain.

    You assert that "we know it causes weight gain in adults" -- and we know it does this by way of inflammation, creating gut issues, and possibly leading to pretty major metabolic issues. If it causes these problems in adults, why would we want to give it to children as a staple food in order to "help them gain weight" via these issues?

    Instead, you simply assert your ethos, that you "have your opinion."

    If you can put forth a logical reason why wheat in should be the first 'go-to' -- I'd be happy to hear it.

    Additionally, you are mistaken that the comparison with the GF community is a "straw man." It is absolutely a comparable community. While it may be true that many of them do utilize baked goods in the US, here in NZ, it's quite the opposite. GF baking is reserved for treats, and usually using the less expensive flours such as tapioca. The products are too expensive for weekly consumption for most families.

    I have many friends whose families are GF, and most of them simply avoid breads, pastas and tortillas, and will make their own home-made treats (cakes, cookies, scones, breads) on a relatively regular basis using the tapioca, coconut, and sometimes chickpea flours. On rare occasion, they'll use spelt and rye -- rare because these are expensive flours here. Mostly, they ate "primal" -- though they know nothing about it.

    When this community needs to 'fatten up" their kids, they simply cannot turn to wheat, and most of them cannot afford bread. But they can afford more butter, or tallow, or lard, or using offal such as marrow. They'll also use more pumpkin, potato, sweet potato, and similar. It's where they go.

    So why would we choose otherwise?

  6. #46
    Damiana's Avatar
    Damiana is offline Senior Member
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    As long as they're eating nutritiously, I wouldn't worry about their weight. Kids are the most natural of intuitive eaters, they will eat when they're hungry and stop when they're full until adults enforce their food wisdom upon them. Unless their blood tests are abnormal or the doctors show concern, I wouldn't worry much about it.

    I knew plenty of scrawny kids (I was one myself, whom my parents sought to fatten with copious amounts of Ensure and hamburgers, without much success) who grew up into perfectly healthy adults. You're in a developed nation; food is plentiful. Your children will not starve, even if they're underweight.
    F 28/5'4/100 lbs

    "I'm not a psychopath, I'm a high-functioning sociopath; do your research."

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