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Thread: How to fatten up my children?!? page 2

  1. #11
    Neckhammer's Avatar
    Neckhammer is online now Senior Member
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    No worries IMO. Don't bother changing a thing. Your kids are normal. Its just the rest of the children are overweight and unhealthy making yours appear skinny by comparison.

    My kids are about the same weights and ages. I'm proud to have lean healthy children that don't need metformin, or are looking to be contestants on the new "Biggest Loser: Kids Rule!" coming this fall.

  2. #12
    Gwynn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Neckhammer View Post
    No worries IMO. Don't bother changing a thing. Your kids are normal. Its just the rest of the children are overweight and unhealthy making yours appear skinny by comparison.

    My kids are about the same weights and ages. I'm proud to have lean healthy children that don't need metformin, or are looking to be contestants on the new "Biggest Loser: Kids Rule!" coming this fall.
    Neckhammer,

    You kidding!!?? BL is going to feature kids this time? How old are the contestants?

  3. #13
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    I agree with the last few posts. Don't force your kids to eat more, that could possibly screw up their thinking about food. And definitely don't feed them junk food and sugar just so they'll eat more calories. When I was little I ate A TON and I was so skinny that the teachers at my school thought I was anorexic (I went to a really uptight school) and they used to watch me eat lunch every day. It was not cool! When they weren't watching, I was beating the biggest boy in my grade in taco-eating contests on taco day (I won with 12 in 6th grade). Some kids are just naturally skinny. Kids are also more in touch with their hunger than adults. Just let them decide when they're hungry and when they're full, they won't starve.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ann1217 View Post
    I agree with the last few posts. Don't force your kids to eat more, that could possibly screw up their thinking about food. And definitely don't feed them junk food and sugar just so they'll eat more calories. When I was little I ate A TON and I was so skinny that the teachers at my school thought I was anorexic (I went to a really uptight school) and they used to watch me eat lunch every day. It was not cool! When they weren't watching, I was beating the biggest boy in my grade in taco-eating contests on taco day (I won with 12 in 6th grade). Some kids are just naturally skinny. Kids are also more in touch with their hunger than adults. Just let them decide when they're hungry and when they're full, they won't starve.
    +1
    though sometimes kids don't eat because they'd rather be playing or something. you could evaluate meal times to see if you need to reduce distractions. beyond that, i really wouldn't encourage them to eat more than they're hungry for. i was very skinny as a girl, now i'm a very healthy weight (a little more fat than i'd like, but well within "healthy) and have a decent amount of muscle. maybe you could encourage physical activities that are muscle-building (think monkey bars, games involving squatting and jumping, things like that). you might encourage their bodies to build muscle mass, and their appetites would likely increase proportionately.

  5. #15
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    I have a 4 skinnies on my hands too. They are growing at their own rates and eating a ton, so I just keep on keeping on with them! Lots of protein, fat, and no limit on healthy carbs- lots of fruit and veg, with occasional rice and potatoes. I think all the "averages" are so skewed nowadays that our healthy kids end up off the low end of the charts.
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  6. #16
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    I have a 4yo DD that is ~32lbs and 2yo DS that is 25lbs. Just had DS in for his 2yo check-up and shockingly the pedi just said "he's been this way for a while, so he's fine". Both kids are super active and eat when hungry. We do breakfast, lunch, dinner, and I only refuse food if it's 30 minutes before a emal as far as snacks. Some kids are just plain skinny. Definitely don't restrict carbs, DS loves bananas. DD ate probably 1/3lb of meatloaf for dinner tonight, DS ate 2 fried eggs for breakfast. I talk with DD about filling her tummy at each meal and she will sometimes clear her plate, other times eat very little. There are weeks when I think we'll go broke feeding the kids, then the next week they eat practically nothing. As long as they are still gaining, growing, and developing try not to worry.

    I agree that average weights are skewed these days, right along woth clothing sizes.

  7. #17
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    Do your kids still have enough energy to run around? If so, they are probably getting enough food. The diet you are listing sounds awesome.

    I can't say that we suffer from the same problem as the OP (our 8yr is about 32kg/68lb, and our 5yr and 2yr are both about 19kg/40lb). The kids have free access to fruit and nuts whenever they want to graze (we've stopped giving them morning and afternoon tea). Breakfast for them is usually porridge with cream, raw milk and yoghurt.

  8. #18
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    I really disagree with this whole idea that "averages are skewed" because there are overweight kids.

    Kids need carbs, and lots ofw them. I feed my kid whole foods, but also as many carbs as he wants. Kids need carbs -- period. My 8 yar old is super active, and while he is in the 85th pcentile for weight ( and 95th for height) you can see every little muscle in his mini 6 pack. So, just because a kid ia above average in weight, doesn't mean they have excess body fat. I love thos board, but i don't think the advice goes for kids, except that they should be eating real food.

  9. #19
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    i think the takehome point with "averages are skewed" is simply that the percentile is based on "average" and the average kid in the US is not healthy. just because a kid is a certain percentile does not make the kid un/healthy. maybe i need to read more closely, but i don't see anyone suggesting restricted carbs or restricted food at all. some kids are just more slender than others.

  10. #20
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    My three year old twins are around 30lbs a piece. They are thin, but so was their father when he was a child. He was small and skinny until he was a senior in HS, now he's a 6'3 220lb hunk of man, lol!!! Also, my kids still eat carbs, I give them cereal with milk if they want it and they eat tons of fruit every day, mostly bananas and berries. They also have pb&j, chicken nuggets sometimes and pizza, that kind of stuff.

    I would say that as long as your kids seem satisfied hunger wise and you feed them when they ask for food, they are probably just skinny kids or going through a skinny phase. A lot of that has to do with genetics. My first daughter from a different father has always faired on the thicker side and has never been skinny, even as a toddler. And now I have my twins who are basically walking sticks but they eat just as much if not more than my first ever did. I really think genetics plays a big role, but also keep in mind that you are not shoveling crap into your children all day like a lot of parents do, so compared to other's children yours may seem lean, when actually they are normal and healthy.

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