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  1. #331
    otzi's Avatar
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    Funny what you can find with a new search term (AVA):
    European Journal of Applied Physiology, Volume 111, Number 12 - SpringerLink

    This studied shows that a warm face results in warm fingers. That tells me that when the face is cold, you get decreased bloodflow to the fingers. Not sure what this all means yet, but I think I'm on to something...


    When people dress for cold weather, the face often remains exposed. Facial cooling can decrease finger blood flow, reducing finger temperature (T f). This study examined whether thermal face protection limits finger cooling and thereby improves thermal comfort and manual dexterity during prolonged cold exposure. T f was measured in ten volunteers dressed in cold-weather clothing as they stood for 60 min facing the wind (−15C, 3 m s−1), once while wearing a balaclava and goggles (BAL), and once with the balaclava pulled down and without goggles (CON). Subjects removed mitts, wearing only thin gloves to perform Purdue Pegboard (PP) tests at 15 and 50 min, and Minnesota Rate of Manipulation (MRM) tests at 30 and 55 min. Subjects rated their thermal sensation and comfort just before the dexterity tests. T f decreased (p < 0.05 for time trial interaction) by 15 min of cold exposure during CON (33.6 1.4–28.7 2.0C), but not during BAL (33.2 1.4–30.6 3.2C); and after 30 min T f remained warmer during BAL (23.3 5.9C) than CON (19.2 3.5); however, by 50 min, T f was no different between trials (14.1 2.7C). Performance on PP fell (p < 0.05) by 25% after 50 min in both trials; MRM performance was not altered by cold on either trial. Subjects felt colder (p < 0.05) and more uncomfortable (p < 0.05) during CON, compared to BAL. Thermal face protection was effective for maintaining warmer T f and thermal comfort during cold exposure; however, local cooling of the hands during manual dexterity tests reduced this physiological advantage,

  2. #332
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    Quote Originally Posted by otzi View Post
    Funny what you can find with a new search term (AVA):
    European Journal of Applied Physiology, Volume 111, Number 12 - SpringerLink

    This studied shows that a warm face results in warm fingers. That tells me that when the face is cold, you get decreased bloodflow to the fingers. Not sure what this all means yet, but I think I'm on to something...


    When people dress for cold weather, the face often remains exposed. Facial cooling can decrease finger blood flow, reducing finger temperature (T f). This study examined whether thermal face protection limits finger cooling and thereby improves thermal comfort and manual dexterity during prolonged cold exposure. T f was measured in ten volunteers dressed in cold-weather clothing as they stood for 60 min facing the wind (−15C, 3 m s−1), once while wearing a balaclava and goggles (BAL), and once with the balaclava pulled down and without goggles (CON). Subjects removed mitts, wearing only thin gloves to perform Purdue Pegboard (PP) tests at 15 and 50 min, and Minnesota Rate of Manipulation (MRM) tests at 30 and 55 min. Subjects rated their thermal sensation and comfort just before the dexterity tests. T f decreased (p < 0.05 for time trial interaction) by 15 min of cold exposure during CON (33.6 1.4–28.7 2.0C), but not during BAL (33.2 1.4–30.6 3.2C); and after 30 min T f remained warmer during BAL (23.3 5.9C) than CON (19.2 3.5); however, by 50 min, T f was no different between trials (14.1 2.7C). Performance on PP fell (p < 0.05) by 25% after 50 min in both trials; MRM performance was not altered by cold on either trial. Subjects felt colder (p < 0.05) and more uncomfortable (p < 0.05) during CON, compared to BAL. Thermal face protection was effective for maintaining warmer T f and thermal comfort during cold exposure; however, local cooling of the hands during manual dexterity tests reduced this physiological advantage,
    I wonder what the experience be like if you were exposed to low temps, with your face protected and your limbs in just regular clothing. maybe something for you to try up there in Alaska.
    Learning the intricacies of healthy eating and nourishing my body the right way.
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  3. #333
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    So these studies seem to point to CT by just face dunks or hand submerging.
    Learning the intricacies of healthy eating and nourishing my body the right way.
    I am not bald, that is a Vitamin D collector. Time to Grok and Roll!
    Eased into a primal diet starting at Christmas 2011. Goal weight - 205 started: 240 pounds waist 40, now 227 pounds and waist 38 Summer 2012 - weight =215 and waist is actually still 39"
    ljbprrfmof = LJ = Little John = John

  4. #334
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    Quote Originally Posted by otzi View Post
    Funny what you can find with a new search term (AVA):
    European Journal of Applied Physiology, Volume 111, Number 12 - SpringerLink

    This studied shows that a warm face results in warm fingers. That tells me that when the face is cold, you get decreased bloodflow to the fingers. Not sure what this all means yet, but I think I'm on to something...


    When people dress for cold weather, the face often remains exposed. Facial cooling can decrease finger blood flow, reducing finger temperature (T f). This study examined whether thermal face protection limits finger cooling and thereby improves thermal comfort and manual dexterity during prolonged cold exposure. T f was measured in ten volunteers dressed in cold-weather clothing as they stood for 60 min facing the wind (−15C, 3 m s−1), once while wearing a balaclava and goggles (BAL), and once with the balaclava pulled down and without goggles (CON). Subjects removed mitts, wearing only thin gloves to perform Purdue Pegboard (PP) tests at 15 and 50 min, and Minnesota Rate of Manipulation (MRM) tests at 30 and 55 min. Subjects rated their thermal sensation and comfort just before the dexterity tests. T f decreased (p < 0.05 for time trial interaction) by 15 min of cold exposure during CON (33.6 1.4–28.7 2.0C), but not during BAL (33.2 1.4–30.6 3.2C); and after 30 min T f remained warmer during BAL (23.3 5.9C) than CON (19.2 3.5); however, by 50 min, T f was no different between trials (14.1 2.7C). Performance on PP fell (p < 0.05) by 25% after 50 min in both trials; MRM performance was not altered by cold on either trial. Subjects felt colder (p < 0.05) and more uncomfortable (p < 0.05) during CON, compared to BAL. Thermal face protection was effective for maintaining warmer T f and thermal comfort during cold exposure; however, local cooling of the hands during manual dexterity tests reduced this physiological advantage,

    Ok, most of that is Greek to me. And this probably has no relevance whatsoever, but I've always heard to wear a hat. You lose your heat through the top of your head. And also I hear ppl complain about cold feet, and if their feet are cold then their whole body is cold.

    Again, I dont have a point or anything. Just tossing that out there.

    I also know that I use to run cold. Now I run hot, most always. Even when I cold pack my back, I still get too hot. Now last night, I can remember after one of my power surges, I did actually get goosebumps and shiver for a bit. I decided to go with it, rather than try to cover up tight. I figured the shivering would be beneficial like the cold bath shivers
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  5. #335
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    Quote Originally Posted by ljbprrfmof View Post
    I wonder what the experience be like if you were exposed to low temps, with your face protected and your limbs in just regular clothing. maybe something for you to try up there in Alaska.
    I'm thinking that sitting in your warm living room, holding ice packs in each hand, might be just as good as soaking in a cold bath.

  6. #336
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    Quote Originally Posted by gopintos View Post
    You lose your heat through the top of your head. And also I hear ppl complain about cold feet, and if their feet are cold then their whole body is cold.
    Then maybe we should do just the opposite--not wear a hat, gloves, or warm socks. I have been CT'ing in cold air for some years, but always wore hat, gloves, boots--maybe it would be better to wear clothes, but keep the hands, feet, head cold as possible...in regards to BAT anyway.

  7. #337
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    My boy scout troop leader always told us in winter, if your arms or legs were cold, pull your knit hat down an cover your temples. he would hike in 10-13 degree weather in shirt sleeves. I always thought it was because he carried a pack or the wind was calm, but now I know he was cold adapted.
    Learning the intricacies of healthy eating and nourishing my body the right way.
    I am not bald, that is a Vitamin D collector. Time to Grok and Roll!
    Eased into a primal diet starting at Christmas 2011. Goal weight - 205 started: 240 pounds waist 40, now 227 pounds and waist 38 Summer 2012 - weight =215 and waist is actually still 39"
    ljbprrfmof = LJ = Little John = John

  8. #338
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    This talk is really getting me thinking. When I first went to college all I had was an old down coat, no hat gloves or boots. I had to stand outside for a long time for buses, walk in the cold for long periods of time. Not really something I was used to in high school, and chicago winters down in the loop can be downright horrible. I didn't really think about diet or exercise at the time but somehow I dropped 50 lbs over 1.5 years, and most of that was over the winter, I couldn't figure out how I did it. I think this winter I may experiment again with just a down coat, see what happens.

    I've been doing cold showers for 2 solid months now. I love them, they are really the best after a hard workout to keep the muscles from getting sore. I've got a half marathon this weekend that I'm not quite ready for, I think I might do a looongg cold water soak afterwords. I'm very interested in how sore my muscles will be the next day, even when I'm better prepared for a half marathon I'm usually still a mess the next few days from extreme muscle soreness.

  9. #339
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    Quote Originally Posted by otzi View Post
    --maybe it would be better to wear clothes
    The neighbors will appreciate that gesture.

    Quote Originally Posted by lizzychan5 View Post
    all I had was an old down coat, no hat gloves or boots
    DH gets aggravated at me, cuz I am constantly running outside for this or that, with no shoes, no coat, etc. In the snow, on the ice, or just cold concrete on the sidewalk. I run out to feed the birds or something. Or I go to the horse barn w/o a jacket and my flip flops, cuz I don't intend to stay long, but then always end up having to stay longer than I planned.

    Last year I kept my house temp on this main floor down a bit, thinking it would help me burn a few more calories trying to stay warm. I also thought so long as I don't turn the temp up and get use to it being warmer, that would be better. Save a few bucks at the same time. I can remember DD saying something like "yal we're all freezing cuz Mom is trying to lose some weight" or something like that.

    I cold packed again last night. I have to say that this warmth that I feel after I get up, I really rather enjoy it. It is just located in my shoulder blade area, and feels like a heating pad on my back. I am hoping it means good stuff is happening.
    Last edited by gopintos; 09-07-2012 at 02:29 AM.
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  10. #340
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    Quote Originally Posted by RaeVynn View Post
    I have begun some CT things, myself.

    I need to set a timer, I think. Or, get a clock where I can see it in the shower.

    I've done one cold bath. I think I caused a muscle spasm in my back trying that... it was really, really difficult to get myself to lay back in the water, and my muscles refused to relax. I'll keep doing the showers until I get more used to it before I do a bath again.
    I had the same issue of not knowing how much time passed while in the shower. So, I bring my little portable speakers into the bathroom and put on a playlist on my ipod so I know after certain songs have played, how much time has elapsed. Plus, I've found that having music to sing and dance along with in the shower makes it much more fun, and the time really flies by

    I personally just plop myself into the ice bath (faster is easier, like jumping into the ocean versus inching in slowly, or ripping a bandaid quickly instead of dragging out the pain!) But I've read that some people find it easier to start off by sitting/reclining in an empty tub, then letting the cold water fill up around them. Maybe this would be easier for you? We don't want you spasming out on us!

    Actually, it just occured to me that you could make a lukewarm bath, get in and get used to it, then run cold water and open the drain so that the warmer water drains out a bit and is slowly replaced by cooler water. Maybe after doing this a while you could work up to adding in ice, if that was your goal. But even taking a nice cold tap water bath would be great, even without the ice, if that was too much for you.
    Last edited by BestBetter; 09-07-2012 at 04:29 AM.

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