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Thread: Workout Recovery page

  1. #1
    GeorgiaPeach's Avatar
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    Workout Recovery

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    What's the best way to recover from an intense workout? Squats in particular made me so sore!!! And that was two days ago. If I am supposed to do the PB fitness lift heavy things twice a week, I want to make sure I am not taking too long to recover so that I can move slowly, do sprints, and make it back to the next lift heavy things workout.
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  2. #2
    wolfman's Avatar
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    FOOD, best way to recover. I have been an avid lifter and trainer for a few years now. After your workouts eat lots of protein that's pretty much it. The soreness will go away as your body gets used to the weights and schedule. As a general rule, don't sprint before or after your squat day, and it's okay to lift through soreness, getting blood into the muscles will actually speed recovery, and always roll out using a foam roller after squats, most gyms should have them if not get one. Warm up very well if you are sore, and listen to your body, if it feels like your muscle is ripping off your bone, take a day off. Your body will get used to working out and the soreness will subside.

  3. #3
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    What wolfman said.

    If you're sore for that long, and you haven't just started a new routine, you are most likely lacking in some form of nutrition.

    You may also not be warming up, or cooling down, appropriately. Unless you're one of those people that has a hard time sweating you should have started before you get into the squat rack, I do 10min on the bike and a joint warmup routine. 10min on the bike at 10-12 resistance gets my body warm and starting to sweat but doesn't tire my muscles. I also wear a light jumpsuit in the spring/summer for my warmup to aid in this (heavier in the winter), which also helps warmup the joints.

    A joint warmup is basically just arm circles, leg swings etc... but for all your joints, so wrists, elbows, neck, back, hips, ankles, knees. It also helps identify any problem areas, my right hammy usually twings on CCW hip rotations, it goes away after a few but I have to be gentle with it to start.

    And PWO whichever muscles are sore now, those are the ones you have to focus on stretching after your lift. When I do deadlifts I roll my lower back in my rest period before the next exercise and it's fine, if not it'll be sore all day.

    You may also want to consider an ice bath (10-15min) when you get home. It helps more than anything else for post workout recovery.

    And don't forget to move on your days off, going for a walk will help your muscles recover, especially if you add some range of motion stuff. You might even just run through a warmup and cooldown routine without doing any hard work.
    Last edited by federkeil; 06-04-2012 at 07:59 AM.
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  4. #4
    wolfman's Avatar
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    Ditto on that

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    It's funny, wolfman says protein, Bosnic - links to a post on fasting. I found, quite by accident, an extra helping of carbs actually helped with my recovery. And, yes, moving on your days off definitely helps.

  7. #7
    GeorgiaPeach's Avatar
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    One commenter said:
    During a fast your body is already up-regulating catecholemines such as epinephrine, norepinephrine, and cortisol. When you train in a completely fasted state, your body pumps out even more more adrenaline, noradrenaline, and cortisol to release fatty acids and glycogen from fat cells and the liver, respectively.

    So that would be a bad thing for someone with adrenal fatigue, right?
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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by GeorgiaPeach View Post
    One commenter said:
    During a fast your body is already up-regulating catecholemines such as epinephrine, norepinephrine, and cortisol. When you train in a completely fasted state, your body pumps out even more more adrenaline, noradrenaline, and cortisol to release fatty acids and glycogen from fat cells and the liver, respectively.

    So that would be a bad thing for someone with adrenal fatigue, right?
    I believe I have adrenal fatigue, and I haven't noticed any worsening from workout out or fasting (and both at the same time). In fact, I think it's helping.

    When I don't get enough exercise, I tend to either be really jittery or completely exhausted, and usually it's both of those at the same time somehow. So regular exercise has been helping a lot. And I think fasting has also helped keep my energy more steady, and less prone to extreme stress and then crashing.

    That's just my experience. On top of fasting and exercise, I always get ~10 hours of sleep to give my adrenals a well needed rest. If I feel too tired one day, I won't exercise. If after a workout I feel sleepy, I'll take a 45 min nap. Rest is extremely important for adrenal fatigue, and so is regular exercise (when you feel up to it of course).
    Last edited by Bosnic; 06-04-2012 at 05:28 PM.

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  10. #10
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    I have been doing really heavy squats. These would leave me sore for 2-4 days. Here's what I started doing, and I'm pretty sure this is what Mark Sisson does based on today's blog.

    6-8 hours after an intense workout, fill bathtub with full cold tapwater. You want the water to be colder than 50 degrees. Add ice if you need to get it down. Soak as much of you in this water for 30 minutes. The cold water has an anti-inflammatory effect and will leave your muscles feeling much better. There is a ton of science behind this.

    Alternatives - find a cold river/lake or find a gym that has a coldwater tub designed for this exact purpose--usually kept at 40 degrees.

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