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Thread: Anyone eat or juice Aloe Vera straight off the plant? page

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    destructalux's Avatar
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    Anyone eat or juice Aloe Vera straight off the plant?

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    Got a fair few aloe plants growing around home. Keen to put them to good use if they are edible/juiceable... any good advice appreciated

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    MissLindsay's Avatar
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    First make sure the variety you've got on your hands is edible- I'm not sure they all are. I like to filet a big chunk- slice off all the green- then throw it in a blender with your normal smoothie/shake fare. It tends to be just a tad bitter. Supposed to be excellent for digestion and high in sulphur!

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    i've read there's a substance in aloe vera which causes loose bowels, so you might want to experiment cautiously. it's supposed to be really healing for stomach ulcers.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Saoirse View Post
    i've read there's a substance in aloe vera which causes loose bowels, so you might want to experiment cautiously. it's supposed to be really healing for stomach ulcers.
    I believe the strong laxative is a sappy substance in the green skin, and the gel can act as a very mild laxative. Do be careful though!

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    destructalux's Avatar
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    How do I determine what variety it is? Can I just blend it straight with water?

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    destructalux's Avatar
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    Primal Blueprint Expert Certification
    found this: There are over 240 different species of Aloe, growing mainly in the dry regions of Africa, Asia, Europe and America.

    Although Aloe Vera is a member of the Lily family, it is very-cactus like in its characteristics. This unique plant also belongs to a larger plant family called "Xeroids". Of the 240+ species of Aloe, only four are recognized as being of nutritional value to humans and animals. Aloe barbadensis miller (Aloe Vera species) is the top of these four. Significantly the top.


    Thus, any aloe-based product you use should be made from barbadensis miller species.

    http://curezone.com/foods/aloevera.asp

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