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Thread: low-fiber veggies? page 3

  1. #21
    Alykat's Avatar
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    How many grams of fiber do you get a day?
    How about fat grams?
    I have ibs constipation so I'm going for lower fiber more fat if it has worked for you...???

  2. #22
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    There is a lot of information out there that suggest fiber really causes a lot of irritation in the bowel movements. Then we have the Massai Warriors who lived on meat, milk, and blood. They weren't getting any fiber at all and didn't suffer. This just one of many civilizations that thrived on no fiber.

    In my experience fiber really irritates my gut and bowels. Increased fat, more moderate protein, and fermented foods do wonders.
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  3. #23
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    Fiber from lentils gives me gas, so I started to eat less. When I was vegetarian, lentils were my main source of protein, so I just lived with the gas and bloating.

    I still eat fibrous veggies, e.g. cabbage, cauliflower, spinach, bitter gourd, okra, etc. I think I was eating a ton of veggies before because I was trying to eat less starch/grains, and haven't upped fat enough (people raise an eye when they see me eating more fat). Still, I wonder if the fiber mentioned in Fiber Menace is mostly grains, legumes, etc, or does it also include all those veggies. I really like green veggies, cabbage, cauliflower, broccoli, etc, but too much give me gas.

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by girlhk View Post
    Still, I wonder if the fiber mentioned in Fiber Menace is mostly grains, legumes, etc, or does it also include all those veggies. I really like green veggies, cabbage, cauliflower, broccoli, etc, but too much give me gas.
    There are two types of fiber: soluble and insoluble.

    Soluble fiber is the 'good' fiber. This type of fiber can be digested, and supports the probiotic gut flora. Examples of soluble fiber are things like apple and potato (without the peel).

    Insoluble fiber is the type that is very irritating to the digestive system because it can not be digested since we don't produce the enzyme, cellulase, which is required to break it down. Since we must rely on our gut bacteria to ferment this type of fiber, eating excessive amounts of it often causes bloating and inflammation, due to the gas build-up from the fermentation in the gut.

    Vegetables are primarily made of cellulose, which is insoluble fiber. With certain types, you can reduce this by peeling and deseeding them, or running them through a juicer to separate the fiber or cooking them, but others you just have to accept that you might not be able to eat as much of them if you want to heal.

    Grains and legumes are problematic because the outer coating generally contains insoluble fiber (much like the peel of vegetables and fruits), which can't be easily separated. White rice, for example, has had the outer germ layer removed, so it doesn't contain this problematic insoluble fiber (nor the anti-nutrients).
    Last edited by BestBetter; 11-03-2012 at 01:34 PM.

  5. #25
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    Broccoli definitely gave me lots of gas, constipation and make my crap really dark. I went on a broccoli binge a year ago cause I thought it was good for you but now I'm not so sure.

  6. #26
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    Appreciate this thread and the posters who renewed it. I was told by a dietician how fiber wd. blunt the rise of Blood Sugar therefore eat whole grain bread, etc. I was eating whole grains all and I ended up as previously mentioned bloated, and could've been a horn section for a jazz band. More is better, right? Lentils , etc. are a no-no for me now as I understand they will work against blood sugar control. "Whole-wheat" bread will spike BS not much differently than white bread. I tend to cook my vegetables (mostly sauteing in butter, coconut oil or palm oil)and then add them to meat in a simmering sauce. So far doing OK this way but need to expand my culinary palette a bit. BTW good post BB on the types of fiber. Like I mentioned, good thread. I see myself getting the aformentioned book.

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    In my experience fiber really irritates my gut and bowels. Increased fat, more moderate protein, and fermented foods do wonders.[/QUOTE]

    I was considering getting to this point- only fiber will be coming from fermented veggies.

    Makes me ask- has anyone gone with only doing meats and juicing the veggies ( no fiber)?
    I would LOVE to hear how that went or is going?

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by BennettC View Post
    There is a lot of information out there that suggest fiber really causes a lot of irritation in the bowel movements. Then we have the Massai Warriors who lived on meat, milk, and blood. They weren't getting any fiber at all and didn't suffer. This just one of many civilizations that thrived on no fiber.

    In my experience fiber really irritates my gut and bowels. Increased fat, more moderate protein, and fermented foods do wonders.
    You are making this up.

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by BestBetter View Post
    There are two types of fiber: soluble and insoluble.

    Soluble fiber is the 'good' fiber. This type of fiber can be digested, and supports the probiotic gut flora. Examples of soluble fiber are things like apple and potato (without the peel).

    Insoluble fiber is the type that is very irritating to the digestive system because it can not be digested since we don't produce the enzyme, cellulase, which is required to break it down. Since we must rely on our gut bacteria to ferment this type of fiber, eating excessive amounts of it often causes bloating and inflammation, due to the gas build-up from the fermentation in the gut.

    Vegetables are primarily made of cellulose, which is insoluble fiber. With certain types, you can reduce this by peeling and deseeding them, or running them through a juicer to separate the fiber or cooking them, but others you just have to accept that you might not be able to eat as much of them if you want to heal.

    Grains and legumes are problematic because the outer coating generally contains insoluble fiber (much like the peel of vegetables and fruits), which can't be easily separated. White rice, for example, has had the outer germ layer removed, so it doesn't contain this problematic insoluble fiber (nor the anti-nutrients).

    Best butter- do you know if our body (intestines) absorbs all the plant mass when they are cooked? When I eat "raw" veggies my stools are more so, but if I "cook" veg. I have No stools? I don't get it??

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alykat View Post
    Best butter- do you know if our body (intestines) absorbs all the plant mass when they are cooked? When I eat "raw" veggies my stools are more so, but if I "cook" veg. I have No stools? I don't get it??
    Best butter, I like that

    From what I've read, although certain nutrients, like some enzymes or vitamin C, are destroyed during cooking, for the most part cooking actually makes the nutrients in veggies and other foods more bioavailable.

    This is an interesting paleo/primalish nutritional blog that kind of sums it up well:

    Put Down That Kale Smoothie – Why You Should Cook Your Food | Radiance Nutrtion

    This article by Chris Kresser, one of my fave paleo-ish doctors says if you have digestive problems, peel+deseed everything, lay off the veggies taht are high in insoluble fiber, and whatever you do eat, make sure it's cooked:

    Got digestive problems? Take it easy on the veggies.

    And this one is short, but I found it interesting:

    Fact or Fiction: Raw veggies are healthier than cooked ones: Scientific American

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