Results 1 to 4 of 4

Thread: Hypo, Hashi's? Hack my thyroid/hormone labs (please) page

  1. #1
    waywardsister's Avatar
    waywardsister is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    5

    Hypo, Hashi's? Hack my thyroid/hormone labs (please)

    (and thank you)

    Labs are from ZRT. Cortisol was fine, I'm concerned mainly with thyroid results and possibly with estradiol/progesterone ratio. I am female, 37 yrs old.

    First result is [C] current, second result (after range) is from 1 year ago [Y]

    Estradiol [range 1.3-3.3]
    2.4 [C]
    1.4 [Y]

    Progesterone [range 75-270]
    101 [C]
    134 [Y]

    ratio: Pg/E2 [Optimal: 100-500]
    42 [C]
    96 [Y]

    TSH [range: 0.5-3.0]
    2.8 [C]
    2.5 [Y]

    Free T4 [range: 0.7-2.5]
    1.2 [C]
    1.6 [Y]

    Free T3 [range: 2.5-6.5]
    1.3 [C]
    3 [Y]

    TPO antibodies [range: 0-150]
    34 [C]
    28 [Y]

    I've suspected a possible thyroid issue for awhile. Took me over 2 years to lose 25lbs, and my body stuck there no matter how I ate (LC, VLC, ZC, moderate carb etc) Last year and this year, been having symptoms such as puffy hands, feet and face; sudden weight gain (10lbs in a month or so, no diet change), zero libido, fatigue, depressed moods, dizziness, weird acne that doesn't heal on chest and neck, hair and jawline.

    I am celiac, and have been gluten-free for 7 years now - I suspect Hashi's for that reason, even though my antibodies are in the low range. I thought perhaps the low T3 could be from being carb-restricted for so long (on average 50g or less for the past several years). I dunno. My sister is celiac as well, and mentioned to me that her doc told her that her thyroid was enlarged during one of her more recent checkups - nothing was done about it. She and I follow a very similar health pattern!

    I am making an appointment with an ND who specializes in thyroid/hormonal issues (and is hypo herself) - took these results to my new regular doc, who had no clue what I was talking about, as they don't even test fT3 or fT4, only TSH. She is sending me for more bloodwork, including another TSH test done her way, ie: not ordered online. I will be smiling politely and ignoring it.

    Anyway, I have a hypothesis about what's going on with me, and am looking to test it (I don't want to decide myself into a dx). There are several ppl here who seem to be pretty in the know when it comes to thyroid, and I'd love feedback. Any feedback on the pg/e2 ratio is welcomed also, as I've no clue what that means other than it may mean I am estrogen dominant? From there, I'm lost.
    Last edited by waywardsister; 06-01-2012 at 05:22 PM. Reason: formatting mucked up

  2. #2
    Pamsc's Avatar
    Pamsc is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    356
    My doctor only tests TSH and I haven't gone out and gotten my own tests yet. But my TSH was creeping up and I was always cold (which was new for me), so I have been looking for ways to boost my sluggish thyroid. My approach is:
    1. use natural sea salt (must have colors in it, not white) and get more sleep to help adrenals
    2. take milk thistle to support the liver, which converts T4 to T3
    3. take iodine and related supplements--it made sense to me that I was iodine deficient because I hadn't used iodized salt in a long time. It is particularly important to take selenium with the iodine if there is any question of antibodies.
    See: http://steppingstonesliving.com/resources/iodine/
    Thyroid Mistreatment, Hypothyroidism Scandals, and Thyroid Treatment Problems | Stop The Thyroid Madness
    I don't see a dramatic difference, but I do have more energy and I am definitely less cold.
    Last edited by Pamsc; 06-01-2012 at 05:44 PM. Reason: better link
    __________________________
    age 56, type 2 diabetes, swimmer
    low carb since 2006 thanks to Jenny, primal since Jan. 2012

  3. #3
    Ingvildr's Avatar
    Ingvildr is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Pacific Northwest
    Posts
    204
    I'm not an expert, but I am hashi's. I was symptomatic and treated at a TSH of 2.6. I had been seeing my endo during my pregnancy with my son because I was diabetic and it is routine to have TSH tested for a pregnant diabetic. They had a good baseline of what my levels were, so when I came in for a checkup a couple years later and complained of feeling like crap and having panic attacks they looked again. My numbers were normally not treatable at 2.6 but because they knew what my TSH had been before they did treat to get back to those levels. I feel 110% better and my last TSH was 1.21. I was advised against taking iodine supplements, but that iodine rich foods were fine. I haven't really tried any nutritional things, but I doubt they would hurt.

  4. #4
    RenegadeRN's Avatar
    RenegadeRN is offline Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    South Central USA
    Posts
    97
    Primal Blueprint Expert Certification
    Only checking a TSH is absolute BS and should be considered malpractice IMHO! ....sorry not one for sugar coating!

    Yep looks a bit on the hypo side to me, but I would also request a reverse T3. One of the hazards of only checking the TSH is you get no complete picture AND what if it's in range but you are making too much RT3?

    In case you've never heard of it ( forgive me if you have) it is a unavailable form that your body can't use. Taking supplemental T3 like cytomel or compounded T3 will gradually reduce the RT3 and give you a lower TSH and more thyroid hormone bioavailability to the body.

    I went thru this ages ago and still fight it a bit to this day! I had Graves disease ( hyperthyroidism) in 1988 and had my thyroid ablated with I-131. Stress and too much T4 can combine to raise the reverse T3 levels. You feel like crap and the docs says you're fine, and it must be something else....argghhh!

    This is the hazard of docs only prescribing T4 only replacement hormones such as Synthyroid, Levoxyl etc. not everyone converts the 4 effectively to the 3 form we use in the cells.

    A great website to check out is : About thyroid.com. It's very well done , accurate and moderated.

    Good luck!

    Stop the Thyroid Madness is another great site.
    Last edited by RenegadeRN; 06-02-2012 at 10:37 PM. Reason: Additional comment
    On breaking out of the healthcare box..."Box? What box? Take cover, it's gonna get ugly... "

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •