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  1. #21
    carlh's Avatar
    carlh is offline Senior Member
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    I'm loving natural soaps made out of coconut/olive oil and a little fragrance. Right now I'm using a great chocolate-and-anise bar.

    I still wash my face with a mild antibacterial soap. I stopped soaping my (short) hair altogether a year ago, but of course I still rinse and scrub my scalp with my finertips/nails.

    Toothpaste is whatever looks most natural to me at the time.

    It all seems to be working out.
    Last edited by carlh; 05-29-2012 at 07:59 AM.

  2. #22
    OutdoorAmy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by namelesswonder View Post
    I use soap on my pits and private parts and scrub gently with a loofah everywhere else. I only break out if I eat too much refined sugar/wheat products (too much can be anywhere from a cookie to a single serving of ice cream). I can't stop washing my hair because I have hard water and it builds up. Nothing seems to "cleanse" my hair effectively like a standard shampoo does =\ I have some natural shampoo bars (all essential oils, coconut oil, jojoba etc.) that work pretty well on my hair, but my scalp is itchy from the build-up that nothing seems to cut through. I'm about ready to give up! Sulfate-free products are so expensive, I was really hoping to do something more "natural" Baking soda and vinegar don't work because of the hard water, it makes it so much worse (and I've tried pre-boiled water, but that doesn't work and it's a huge pain).
    Tresemme is making a sulfate free product now that I really like and is much cheaper than most options. You'll probably have to go to a big box store to find it though.
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  3. #23
    Heidi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Call Me Twitchy View Post
    Bathing in cold water is not something I have been able to bring myself to do...
    It's kinda fun to close my eyes as I get into the cold shower and pretend I'm a kid again, splashing in the brisk river water. Cheap way to energize.
    I'm retraining and strengthening my taste buds, one primal meal at a time.

  4. #24
    Heidi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bosnic View Post
    - Hands: You don't need to wash your hands with antibacterial soap all the time, simply rubbing your hands together in water removes the same amount of bacteria. I only use soap when I have dirt or something oily on my hands that doesn't come off with water. And your immune system does not like a sterile environment, because when you're eventually (and inevitably) exposed to really harmful bacteria, it will not have developed enough to combat it. Get a healthy amount of bacteria! lol
    I've wondered about the need for soap. Half the time I scrub my hands just with water and it hasn't done me any harm.
    I'm retraining and strengthening my taste buds, one primal meal at a time.

  5. #25
    Saoirse's Avatar
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    i've tried no-poo and washing infrequently. what works for my hair is to wash it every other day with giovanni triple treat shampoo, blot dry, and put a little leave-in conditioner on the ends, then let it dry naturally. if the humidity is high, my hair will form lovely loose spirals. otherwise, it's wavy with a golden sheen. shower water temperature is usually what makes me happy, not what's best for me. cold water would be preferable for my hair, that increases the wavy-golden look. but i like comfortably warm water so that's what i use.

    as for my skin, i usually only wash it with water and a washcloth. i still shave where ever/whenever i like because i'm not a cavelady and some body parts just feel better smooth. i have very dry skin and i'm in a semi-arid climate, so i rub my skin post-shower with coconut oil.

    teeth are brushed with a toothbrush (no sticks or bones here) and a homemade tooth powder: xylitol and calcium carbonate mixed. it tastes like powdered sugar. deodorant is coconut oil+baking soda+tea tree oil. maybe if i gave up sugar 100%, as well as the chocolate, dairy, and rare coffee i would not smell. but i don't want to, so i use the homemade pit paste.

  6. #26
    bloodorchid's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kalli889 View Post
    I use flouride-free toothpaste and I wash my face with a 50/50 mixture of castor oil and jojoba oil, and if my face is makeup-free, I'll wash it with raw honey. I use lemon juice mixed with sea salt as a toner. Amazing! I have long, curly hair, and I have yet to find a good sulfate-free method for keeping it clean and soft, although I haven't tried baking soda and vinegar yet. I think the smell of vinegar puts me off PUTTING IT ON MY HAIR. I use Toms' of Maine aluminum-free lavendar deoderant. I have to say that since I've been Primal, my sense of smell has gotten A LOT stronger and perfumes and scented candles that used to please me now give me headaches and sneezes, and that the natural smell of humans smells really, really good to me. Maybe I should say showered humans. Ha ha.
    have you tried just washing with conditioner? if not, try it it works well with my frizzy spiral curls

    my ocd says that when i feel dirty i need soap to feel clean again. so. you know. bubbles!

    re; hand washing, i need hand soap or else my hands feel grimy. if i still made soap i'm cook up a bucket of liquid soap and use that at will. but i'm lazy
    beautiful
    yeah you are

    I mean there's so many ants in my eyes! And there are so many TVs, microwaves, radios... I think, I can't, I'm not 100% sure what we have here in stock.. I don't know because I can't see anything! Our prices, I hope, aren't too low!

  7. #27
    wiltondeportes's Avatar
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    I had a realization recently that helped me out with a bit of sweat rash on my thighs.

    First of all, just water is enough to remove minerals left from sweat or dirt if you played in the mud. The only aspect of cleanliness that we use soap for is to kill bacteria.

    Now even with people's obsession with soap, tons of people have acne, sweat rash, athlete's foot, jock itch, candida, etc. What are these issues but bacteria that is allowed to live on the skin?

    So, soap with our bath is not doing the job when it comes to removing bacteria that we want to kill. I used a saav (I know I am spelling that wrong) of coconut oil, oregano oil, tea tree oil, and a few other ingredients. Essentially, it's a topical anti-bacterial cream. I had bought this a while ago to solve a little athlete's foot. This thing eliminated the sweat rash almost in one night. I used it on other areas of my skin too, and it looks fantastic.

    My realization is to mostly just use soapless showers for removing the dirt/sweat/debri, and to use topical oils for killing the bacteria.

  8. #28
    Saoirse's Avatar
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    (salve)

    i've wanted to develop a topical probiotic for years now. i haven't for a few reasons, namely that i lack a microbiology lab. it would be possible to just slap a few common probiotics into a homemade lotion which have the right properties to be a sufficient growing medium and then sell it, because people seem to think that Lactobacilli have magical properties. but to do it properly, i would want to figure out which bacteria (in addition to the typical food-born e. coli, salmonella, etc.) i'd want to kill, and then i'd have to determine which bacteria can live on skin AND would be able to make life hell for those pathogens. if i just wanted to make it pseudo-scientific, i could slap some L. reuteri into a growing medium and sell it as lotion, but there's no proof that L. reuteri have the same properties topically as they do in intestines. after isolating the correct "beneficial skin bacteria," the next step would be to actually determine if it can live on skin in the medium, and if it actually has the intended results of reducing pathogens on skin.

    anyway, that's my dream of how to keep skin clean. for now, i just use hot water and a fresh wash cloth. sometimes i use tea tree oil on abrasions or rashes that look abnormal.

    (btw, many of the skin issues you mentioned are actually caused by yeast, not bacteria)

  9. #29
    wiltondeportes's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Saoirse View Post
    (salve)

    i've wanted to develop a topical probiotic for years now. i haven't for a few reasons, namely that i lack a microbiology lab. it would be possible to just slap a few common probiotics into a homemade lotion which have the right properties to be a sufficient growing medium and then sell it, because people seem to think that Lactobacilli have magical properties. but to do it properly, i would want to figure out which bacteria (in addition to the typical food-born e. coli, salmonella, etc.) i'd want to kill, and then i'd have to determine which bacteria can live on skin AND would be able to make life hell for those pathogens. if i just wanted to make it pseudo-scientific, i could slap some L. reuteri into a growing medium and sell it as lotion, but there's no proof that L. reuteri have the same properties topically as they do in intestines. after isolating the correct "beneficial skin bacteria," the next step would be to actually determine if it can live on skin in the medium, and if it actually has the intended results of reducing pathogens on skin.

    anyway, that's my dream of how to keep skin clean. for now, i just use hot water and a fresh wash cloth. sometimes i use tea tree oil on abrasions or rashes that look abnormal.

    (btw, many of the skin issues you mentioned are actually caused by yeast, not bacteria)
    Ya, I should have known that. Anti-fungal, anti-bacterial....same difference philosophically. Killing unwanted life on your skin. Salves of various concoctions should do both.

    So you want to create a batch of bacteria to displace the bad bacteria and potentially make life difficult for the fungi? Interesting.

  10. #30
    Saoirse's Avatar
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    yes, indeed. i've wanted to do this for a few years. i think there are some patents out on such an idea, but i don't remember which bacteria are included in the patents. i could see it being used in conjunction with some anti-bacterial essential oils to combat MRSA and the like. I'd also like to classify essential oils by the types of bacteria they kill (gram positive vs. gram negative would be a start), but most websites about essential oils usually say no more than "studies show that XX kills bad stuff" without any references to explain the specifics.

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