Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11

Thread: Marathon Training for Complete Beginner page

  1. #1
    johnnywhisky01's Avatar
    johnnywhisky01 is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    13

    Marathon Training for Complete Beginner

    Primal Fuel
    Hello. There's a marathon coming up mid-October. Is it possible to be able to train for this marathon in a semi-serious/semi-casual manner? I still have to work a sedentary job 40-50 hours a week.

    I've never jogged 2 miles non-stop. The most I've done is 1.5 miles non-stop. But I'm fairly active and fit. I do a boot camp workout for an hour every Sunday and lift weights at the gym 2-3 times a week. But if I do this, I will obviously step up on my running. I'm at 21.2 BMI and eat very healthfully.

    I just want to know if it's safe to register (non-refundable) now and expect to be able to do the marathon or if I'm just wasting my money and should wait until 2013.

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    Hedonist2's Avatar
    Hedonist2 is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    1,215
    Right out of the box, primal is great preparation to do a semi-serious/casual marathon. Focus on becoming a fat burning machine and getting the standard primal exercise plus some endurance training.

    I did a half marathon after training (at age 67) with a group that takes a fairly primal approach (to training, not food). Two sprint sessions/week, once a week increased distance slower than you think you should go, short walks during the week, some cross training and rest days. That will allow you to do respectably well without doing the damage to yourself that marathoning can do.
    Ancestral Health Info - My blog about Primal and the general ancestral health movement. Site just remodeled using HTML5/CSS3 instead of Wordpress.

  3. #3
    Al_Kavadlo's Avatar
    Al_Kavadlo is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    NYC
    Posts
    1,399
    If you can barely run 2 miles now, you're probably not going to be ready to do a Marathon this fall (unless you are willing to devote a ton of time to your training).

    Here are a couple of articles that might help:
    Beginning Running
    Exercise Vs. Skill
    "In theory, theory and practice are the same. In practice, they couldn't be more different."

    "You can have anything you want, but you can't have everything you want."

    My blog: http://www.AlKavadlo.com


  4. #4
    pace2race's Avatar
    pace2race is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Far Side of Hard
    Posts
    217
    Just doing it for the experience of finishing and the enjoyment of the day, you could do it. Play it smart and run walk it and you wouldn't get hurt by it either. Running one to your potential as an athlete wouldn't happen in that time frame. If you are wanting to run it period I would train more and plan it for Spring or Fall in 2013 if you can. Truly running for that distance is a pounding no matter how good your form or how small of a person you are. You need time on your feet running to condition and toughen your muscles and connective tissues to run that far at a serious effort and not have a completely miserable time doing it, followed by weeks of pain afterwards. Bottom line for me would be if this a do it now or have to wait several more years later if ever proposition, I would do it. It is something I do yearly and is high on my list of worth it. If you can train properly for it, do that. You only have one first marathon. I've met some who gutted it out that first time and ended with no desire to ever attempt it again and that is truly sad.

  5. #5
    OscarC's Avatar
    OscarC is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    San Antonio, Texas
    Posts
    6
    If you've never run more than 2 miles, then don't do it. We know, since we are in this forum, that it is not even good for you. Why risk an injury? In fact, an injury is a given, you may have enough time to develop your endurance and aerobic capacity, but not to strengthen your ligaments and muscles the way you need for a marathon. Run a couple of 10 K, a half-marathon this year. If you think you like doing that, then get ready for a marathon. Then I'd use Hal Higdon's training plan for beginners.

    Seriously, don't do it. Not this year.

  6. #6
    federkeil's Avatar
    federkeil is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Calgary
    Posts
    849
    Quote Originally Posted by Al_Kavadlo View Post
    If you can barely run 2 miles now, you're probably not going to be ready to do a Marathon this fall (unless you are willing to devote a ton of time to your training).

    Here are a couple of articles that might help:
    Beginning Running
    Exercise Vs. Skill
    Hey Al, you talk about adapting to running (for those of us that hate it). How long would you say it takes to make that adaptation?
    I didn't like the rules you gave me, so I made some of my own.

    Strong people are harder to kill than weak people, and more useful in general. - Mark Rippetoe

  7. #7
    Al_Kavadlo's Avatar
    Al_Kavadlo is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    NYC
    Posts
    1,399
    Anywhere from a few weeks to a few months depending on the individual. It's a gradual process, like anything else.
    "In theory, theory and practice are the same. In practice, they couldn't be more different."

    "You can have anything you want, but you can't have everything you want."

    My blog: http://www.AlKavadlo.com


  8. #8
    Hedonist2's Avatar
    Hedonist2 is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    1,215
    Johnny, you may not be able to run a marathon but it doesn't sound like you want to do that. I know that I only have a fraction of the experience of Al. But I know that at 69 I went from being a couch potato to doing a respectable half in 3 months. Even if you never have jogged more than 1.5 miles doesn't mean you can't if you are an active guy as you say.

    What is the time limit for the event? You may be able to do intervals of running and walking or light jogging (much healthier than running that far anyway.) Here is Mark's plan for 12 weeks of marathon training. He says it is to do respectably but given his Type A, competitive personality, I think it is a plan to finish close to the front, which is not your goal. You have more than 12 weeks.

    Is there a half connected with the event? You might start with that.

    I won't encourage you to do a marathon, but doing a half was a great bucket event for me.
    Ancestral Health Info - My blog about Primal and the general ancestral health movement. Site just remodeled using HTML5/CSS3 instead of Wordpress.

  9. #9
    johnnywhisky01's Avatar
    johnnywhisky01 is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    13
    Thanks for all the responses. Since it looks like it might be rather tough, I decided to hold off on signing up. If I can jog non-stop for 15 miles by July 31st, I'll sign up. They do offer a half, but I'd rather go for broke or just train until I can.

  10. #10
    greenshady's Avatar
    greenshady is offline Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    34
    I don't think it'll be possible to run it by October with your current conditioning. You could run/walk it. But, I'd shoot for one in October 2013. Here's how I'd set up my training outline:

    3 months - Train for 5K (C25K is a good program for this)
    6 months - Train for 10K
    9 months - Train for 1/2 marathon
    12 months+ - Train for full marathon

    Just take it in steps. Each of these steps are great accomplishments in and of themselves.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •