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    Leonharte's Avatar
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    Organ meat?

    My local woolworths is now stocking a variety of organ meats, tongue, liver, heart and kidney from cows, lambs, and chicken. I'd love to have a go of it, but my housemates want nothing to do with it.

    What's the best to start with, as an introduction? What does it taste like, compared to muscle meat? And what's the best way to cook these to make them look visually appetising to some very fussy friends?
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    I eat a fair amount of organ meats, I grew up in Eastern Europe and it's a fairly common food there.

    I think the most "socially acceptable" organ meat is liver, with hearts (specifically chicken hearts) coming in second. I usually just stir-fry my liver in some butter with sliced onions. For chicken hearts, I sear them in butter, they have a delicious chewy texture and a very mild flavor.

    I also make an adventurous Russian soup based on pickles/pickle juice and chicken hearts/livers (you can also add beef kidneys), but I think it's a bit over the top for most North American palates.

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    Leonharte's Avatar
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    I didn't see chicken hearts, just beef and lamb. I'm pretty adventurous myself, try anything once etc.
    Starting weight: 90kg (11/3/13) (33.1 BMI)
    Current weight: 89.5kg (12/3/13) (32.9 BMI)
    Goal weight: 75kg (27.5 BMI)
    Short term goal: BMI under 30
    Mid term goal:
    40 pushups, 100 situps, 10 pullups, 10.1 beep test, >10m 2.4km run
    Long term goal: Enlist as an ARA Combat Engineer

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    I find heart very rich and tasty, especially slow cooked. A good friend views beef heart as dog food. We are both horrified at the others opinion!! I personally like using different organ meats in stews, along with more regular cuts. It's not overwhelming, and a variety of meats makes for a more interesting stew ie. heart, kidney and shank meat.

    Edit to add, tongue is its own adventure. I love the stuff but it can be a bit rough on people to prep, cook and peel. I toss the veiny bits and the tough outer skin to the dogs, they love it and no waste.
    Last edited by ElaineC; 05-29-2012 at 11:33 PM.
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    js290's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Leonharte View Post
    My local woolworths is now stocking a variety of organ meats, tongue, liver, heart and kidney from cows, lambs, and chicken. I'd love to have a go of it, but my housemates want nothing to do with it.

    What's the best to start with, as an introduction? What does it taste like, compared to muscle meat? And what's the best way to cook these to make them look visually appetising to some very fussy friends?
    The texture of tongue and heart will probably be closest to muscle. Brain has the consistency of eggs. Spleen is like a more mushy liver. Kidney is a lot like tendon, a bit chewy. If you're not sure slow roast is a good start.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by js290 View Post
    The texture of tongue and heart will probably be closest to muscle.
    That's because tongue and heart ARE a muscle :-P

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    Quote Originally Posted by Primalwombat View Post
    That's because tongue and heart ARE a muscle :-P
    LOL... indeed... busted.

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    Quote Originally Posted by EyeOfRound View Post
    I eat a fair amount of organ meats, I grew up in Eastern Europe and it's a fairly common food there.

    I think the most "socially acceptable" organ meat is liver, with hearts (specifically chicken hearts) coming in second. I usually just stir-fry my liver in some butter with sliced onions. For chicken hearts, I sear them in butter, they have a delicious chewy texture and a very mild flavor.

    I also make an adventurous Russian soup based on pickles/pickle juice and chicken hearts/livers (you can also add beef kidneys), but I think it's a bit over the top for most North American palates.
    +1. I grew up in a latinamerican culture and organ meats are as socially acceptable as burgers and fries are here. I've said before that my dad and his buddies taught me "primal" as a kid, long before it was acceptable in the States.
    "After all we did for Britain, selling all that corduroy and making it swing, and all we got was a bit of tin on a piece of leather, an MBE." --George Harrison

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bioletti View Post
    ... as socially acceptable as burgers ... are here.
    And there's one answer O.P.

    Grind 'em up and mix them into minced beef when you make hamburgers.

    Sally Fallon suggests 2 pounds of ground beef and half a pound of ground heart in her standard recipe for hamburgers.

    I've heard of other people putting liver in -- probably not too much as it tastes quite strong.

    chicken liver is good for pate. Lamb's liver is great simply sliced and fried.

  10. #10
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    Lamb's liver is super mild compared to beef, bison, and even chicken. If you find you don't like the taste of liver, but want to include it for nutritional reasons, I recommend our wooly friend, the sheep.

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