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Thread: Flourless gravy, anyone?

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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2012
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    Flourless gravy, anyone?

    Hey everyone,
    I'm desperate. Not really, but I'm in need of your help. Is there such a thing as gravy without flour? Does it even exist? I've tried cookbooks and Bing. Nada results. I'm a lone (primal+crossfit & under 21) college kid living alone and need a solid recipe that provides leftovers (leftovers cold, since I'm too poor to afford a microwave for my unfurnished apartment. My latest achievement was a casserole dish as a gift from grandmom. So I'd love to have a good (beef) casserole recipe with a binding agent such as gravy. I don't mind mixing in one miniscule tablespoon or whatever of flour in it, but I'm not buying a 1-2lb bag O' flour.
    Also, while I'm I'm at it, what about beef stew without wine? I'm under 21 and unable to get a hold of any (its infuriating). Any wine-less, hearty stews out there in the primal world?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2012
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    Also, I'm crock pot-devoid as well... I hate this poor college kid scene

  3. #3
    Join Date
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    Puree onions and garlic. Heat lard, tallow or other fat in dish and add puree. Stir over medium heat until the onions are cooked and the fat begins to separate. It should sizzle gently. Add the meat to brown. Add water to almost cover, salt to taste and any vegetables, spices etc. Cover. Cook on low heat for two hours. Remove the lid and continue to cook until sauce is thick and meat is a rich, dark colour.

    This is a really basic recipe that can be adapted to many cuisines throughout the work by the use of different vegetables, spices etc. Also, if using a lot of spice, it is often better to cook them in the cooked puree for a couple of minutes before adding the meat.
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  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
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    572
    Quote Originally Posted by peril View Post
    Puree onions and garlic. Heat lard, tallow or other fat in dish and add puree. Stir over medium heat until the onions are cooked and the fat begins to separate. It should sizzle gently. Add the meat to brown. Add water to almost cover, salt to taste and any vegetables, spices etc. Cover. Cook on low heat for two hours. Remove the lid and continue to cook until sauce is thick and meat is a rich, dark colour.

    This is a really basic recipe that can be adapted to many cuisines throughout the work by the use of different vegetables, spices etc. Also, if using a lot of spice, it is often better to cook them in the cooked puree for a couple of minutes before adding the meat.
    sorry if this is a dumb question - just blend raw onion and garlic, not cooked? what sort of ratio? ta

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    St. Petersburg, FL
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    I had searched a long time for a thicker too, and have grown fond of Xanthan Gum powder:
    gluten-free, can use in hot or cold liquids, and tasteless.

    Xanthan gum also helps suspend solid particles, such as spices
    and prevents oil separation by stabilizing the emulsion of things like a salad dressing.

    You can find at most any health food store, and a little goes a VERY long way.

    Gravy: remove the meat after pan cooking, and thicken the juices with just a teaspoon of xanthan (or less--start with 1/2 tsp.)
    Presto! Instant gravy that doesn't get all gross & separated when refrigerated--stays a steady consistency.

    Stealth use--add a little to egg salad (or any salad thing with mayo). It will give it a fluffier consistency
    and keeps the salad a nice thick texture rather than getting runnier the longer it's stored.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
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    Arrowroot starch. You can also use some of the GF flour blends that at least don't have gluten, but may have corn starch price starch in them.
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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Twibble View Post
    Arrowroot starch. You can also use some of the GF flour blends that at least don't have gluten, but may have corn starch price starch in them.
    This. Also if you can find an Asian market look for water chestnut powder. Both perfectly Primal thickeners.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    New Zealand
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    We use cornflour as an alternative to wheat flour in gravy. It's not strictly primal, but meh.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Atlanta, GA
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    Sweet rice flour is excellent. Most grocery stores carry mochiko brand in oriental section.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
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    Quad Cities, IA
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    You need to find some second hand stores. The ones I go to usually have crock pots for under $10. I don't think nayone is so broke that they can't afford thrift shops. Do a little leg work and I bet you could score a microwave too. A little hustle goes a long way.
    Check out my primal blog: http://primalroar.posterous.com/

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