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Thread: Loren Cordain interviwed by Andreas Eenfeldt page

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    Moochy's Avatar
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    Loren Cordain interviwed by Andreas Eenfeldt

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    Primal/Paleo is not for everyone, it's for those who have committed to understand.
    READ THE BOOK! ...as Robb Wolf says: "Trying to convince people to save their own ass will burn you out."

    Vegetarians are the enemy of everything good and decent in the human spirit, and an affront to all I stand for -- the pure enjoyment of food. Anthony Bourdain

    and yes, calories DO count my little piggies

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    Thanks. Should be interesting, and over 50 minutes is time in which to say something.

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    It annoys me to no end that Eenfeldt basically manages NOT to ask Cordain about the saturated fat issue. They waltz around it here and there and Cordain mentions that he has moderated his approach and that hunter/gatherers would've gotten at least 10% of daily caloric intake from SFA's. But they never discuss it specifically - Eenfeldt strikes me as a 80/20 (fat/proteins) kinda guy and i still doubt that Cordain would endorse that.
    Loren Cordain is perhaps THE major academic leading the Low-carb train but Eenfeldt manages to beat around the bush with him for 50 minutes. /sigh.

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    Lewis's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NobleSavage View Post
    It annoys me to no end that Eenfeldt basically manages NOT to ask Cordain about the saturated fat issue. They waltz around it here and there and Cordain mentions that he has moderated his approach and that hunter/gatherers would've gotten at least 10% of daily caloric intake from SFA's. But they never discuss it specifically - Eenfeldt strikes me as a 80/20 (fat/proteins) kinda guy and i still doubt that Cordain would endorse that.
    Loren Cordain is perhaps THE major academic leading the Low-carb train but Eenfeldt manages to beat around the bush with him for 50 minutes. /sigh.
    He says in the video that the figures from his survey point to up to 15% of calories from saturated fat.

    I thought he seemed somewhat more fat-friendly than in even the latest edition of The Paleo Diet, which is only a couple of years old. So maybe he's moved a little even recently. Possibly the obesity conference he'd just been at (seems to be where that was filmed) had influenced him.

    He twice cited Jeff Volek approvingly. I was also interested to hear him say that hunters were sometimes selective in which parts of an animal carcass they took, usually going initially for the fattiest cuts and sometimes discarding the rest.

    In the paper from 2000, "Plant-animal subsistence ratios and macronutrient energy estimations in worldwide hunter-gatherer diets", Cordain et al seem to say that hunters did not, or would not, do this:

    Of the options available to achieve this goal, the selective consumption of fatty portions of the carcass while discarding leaner portions of the carcass would have been quite costly on the basis of the ratio of energy capture to energy expenditure ...
    Plant-animal subsistence ratios and macronutrient energy estimations in worldwide hunter-gatherer diets

    I'd treated that with a certain amount of skepticism, because it doesn't matter whether you think it not a good strategy or not -- and anyway that surely depends on the abundance of the prey animal -- if that's what people actually did, and I've always understood from ethnographic accounts that they did. There is also some archaeological evidence for selectivity. Myra Shackley discusses this in relation to John Speth's analysis of the Garnsey Bison Kill Site in New Mexico in her book Using Environmental Archaeology (Batsford, 1985).

    It seems that the hunters carefully considered the age and state of each carcass before butchery, and those parts of the female carcasses which were low in fat were abandoned.
    Anyway, judging by that video, Cordain seems now to accept that hunters preferred to take fattier parts of the carcass when possible.


    He also agreed that butter, despite the palmitic acid, wasn't likely to do Eenfeldt much harm!

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