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  1. #1
    trekfan's Avatar
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    Can the USA get healthier?

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    No end to US obesity epidemic, forecast shows - Health - Diet and nutrition - msnbc.com

    Today, just over a third of U.S. adults are obese. By 2030, 42 percent will be, says a forecast released Monday.

    That's not nearly as many as experts had predicted before the once-rapid rises in obesity rates began leveling off. But the new forecast suggests even small continuing increases will add up.

    "We still have a very serious problem," said obesity specialist Dr. William Dietz of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

    Worse, the already obese are getting fatter. Severe obesity will double by 2030, when 11 percent of adults will be nearly 100 pounds overweight, or more, concluded the research led by Duke University.



    How can we get the USA healthier? Is this something that the government has to mandate (taxes on sugary foods/drinks, fast food, ect)? Will it have to be a grassroots movement at the local level (starting with the community itself, parents, schools, ect)? Should people who are overweight/obese be charged more for insurance (a dollar for every pound overweight)?

    There's a lot of ideas, thoughts, and discussions ongoing out there. The country is clearly on a downward slope in terms of health and a change is needed. The question is, what? Discuss. Debate. Let's see if we can come up with some sort of consensus.
    Went Primal July 25th, 2011.

    Current Age: 25

    Total Loss: 126 lbs

    Starting Stats: Weighed 266 lbs, Body Fat 37.6% (100 lbs), BMI 40.9

    Current Stats: Weight 140 lbs, Body Fat 15.2% (21.1 lbs), BMI 21.2

    Current Goals: Get a stronger core through Pilates and continue being as Primal as I can be.

    My Weight Loss Notes Now on a blog page. It starts with "My Weight Loss: Introduction." Available to the public, share with friends if you'd like!

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    Quote Originally Posted by trekfan View Post
    No end to US obesity epidemic, forecast shows - Health - Diet and nutrition - msnbc.com

    Today, just over a third of U.S. adults are obese. By 2030, 42 percent will be, says a forecast released Monday.

    That's not nearly as many as experts had predicted before the once-rapid rises in obesity rates began leveling off. But the new forecast suggests even small continuing increases will add up.

    "We still have a very serious problem," said obesity specialist Dr. William Dietz of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

    Worse, the already obese are getting fatter. Severe obesity will double by 2030, when 11 percent of adults will be nearly 100 pounds overweight, or more, concluded the research led by Duke University.



    How can we get the USA healthier? Is this something that the government has to mandate (taxes on sugary foods/drinks, fast food, ect)? Will it have to be a grassroots movement at the local level (starting with the community itself, parents, schools, ect)? Should people who are overweight/obese be charged more for insurance (a dollar for every pound overweight)?

    There's a lot of ideas, thoughts, and discussions ongoing out there. The country is clearly on a downward slope in terms of health and a change is needed. The question is, what? Discuss. Debate. Let's see if we can come up with some sort of consensus.
    Well, how do we educate, without alienating to the point blinders are put on instantly? I think this is key. For all the reported attempts to help others go into a paleo/primal direction, few have met with instant success. People have asked me, how I leaned out. The response wasn't thrilling, most of the time when it came to my explanation of what I went through.

    I also don't think taxation/legislation is the answer. My friend told me this in conversation: America got to the point it did, begrudgingly, because of grain/wheat consumption, since it was easily mass produced. In the same token, conventionally raised cattle was a way for the masses to get their meat. Implicitly - in my mind - it also gave free range, more humane farming environments room to thrive. I, admittedly, didn't read much of Mark's post on can we feed the world primally. However, I think (wild guess coming on) if all we had was free roaming animals, it might limit the number of those who are, or would be, in business. I think there's a time, and place for conventionally raising animals, if a facility can't afford to raise it in a sustainable/humane fashion. My hope is, once they've reached a point to where they can do the more humane/optimal route, they'd transition their operation to such.
    If you have a problem with what you read: 1. Get a dictionary 2. Don't read it 3. Grow up 4. After 3, go back to 1/ or 2. -- Dennis Blue. | "I don't care about your opinion, only your analysis"- Professor Calabrese. | "Life is more important than _______" - Drew | I eat animals that eat vegetables -- Matt Millen, former NFL Linebacker. | "This country is built on sugar & shit that comes in a box marinated in gluten - abc123

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    trekfan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lssanjose View Post
    Well, how do we educate, without alienating to the point blinders are put on instantly? I think this is key. For all the reported attempts to help others go into a paleo/primal direction, few have met with instant success. People have asked me, how I leaned out. The response wasn't thrilling, most of the time when it came to my explanation of what I went through.

    I also don't think taxation/legislation is the answer. My friend told me this in conversation: America got to the point it did, begrudgingly, because of grain/wheat consumption, since it was easily mass produced. In the same token, conventionally raised cattle was a way for the masses to get their meat. Implicitly - in my mind - it also gave free range, more humane farming environments room to thrive. I, admittedly, didn't read much of Mark's post on can we feed the world primally. However, I think (wild guess coming on) if all we had was free roaming animals, it might limit the number of those who are, or would be, in business. I think there's a time, and place for conventionally raising animals, if a facility can't afford to raise it in a sustainable/humane fashion. My hope is, once they've reached a point to where they can do the more humane/optimal route, they'd transition their operation to such.
    Whenever people ask me how I lost the weight I did, and I start talking Primal, they usually balk at giving up bread/grains/junk and that's the end of that. I don't honestly know how we can educate people on this healthier lifestyle without them putting the blinders on, simply because people would rather be in denial than be confronted with a hard truth; I know that I was that way before Primal.

    I think we'd have to take it slow, as infuriating as that would be, with the education of a healthier lifestyle. Rather than trumpeting the complete total elimination of grains-which many would see as radical and extreme-we should encourage limiting them at first. I think we'd have to start educating on health at a younger age, elementary school level, so kids can grow up knowing the options rather than getting locked into a certain way of life for years on end before realizing there's more than one way to eat.

    I'll also agree that taxation/legislation isn't the way. Admittedly, the government did play a part in getting us into this mess through their support of unhealthy food but asking the government to fix their mistake is likely to result in an even larger screw up. I'd rather not risk it.

    I think education is key and I think it'll likely have to be done on a very micro level. Each family, each home, will have to be educated on what's healthy and what's not, and it'll be a slow, long, process I imagine. I think we, as a country will easily hit that 42% adult obesity rate by 2030 but I'm hopeful that education of the family, of the people in it, will result in some small gains after that.
    Went Primal July 25th, 2011.

    Current Age: 25

    Total Loss: 126 lbs

    Starting Stats: Weighed 266 lbs, Body Fat 37.6% (100 lbs), BMI 40.9

    Current Stats: Weight 140 lbs, Body Fat 15.2% (21.1 lbs), BMI 21.2

    Current Goals: Get a stronger core through Pilates and continue being as Primal as I can be.

    My Weight Loss Notes Now on a blog page. It starts with "My Weight Loss: Introduction." Available to the public, share with friends if you'd like!

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    ONe problem is that Americans have the cheapest food on the planet. We spend only 5.6% of our income on food (food prepared at home, it's closer to 9% if you include food eaten out). The next closest country is Ireland at 7.5%. When you get to countries that have a population that has a small minority of obese people you will note that the percentage of income food is vastly higher. For example: Nigeria at 40%, Indonesia at 44% and Pakistan at 48%. Although the table i was looking at does not include extremely poor countries like Mali and Chad, I am sure the percentage is much much higher, therefore there would be far less obese people. Americans do not value food. If food was a valued commodity, people would surely make better food choices.
    Here is the table I was referring to ERS/USDA Briefing Room - Food CPI and Expenditures: 2008 Table 97

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    Quote Originally Posted by trekfan View Post
    How can we get the USA healthier?
    Shut down the USDA and FDA.

    Quote Originally Posted by trekfan View Post
    Is this something that the government has to mandate (taxes on sugary foods/drinks, fast food, ect)? Will it have to be a grassroots movement at the local level (starting with the community itself, parents, schools, ect)?
    Who do you trust to make the best choice for yourself?

    Quote Originally Posted by trekfan View Post
    Should people who are overweight/obese be charged more for insurance (a dollar for every pound overweight)?
    If the metrics of success are correct, that may provide the right incentive.

    Quote Originally Posted by trekfan View Post
    There's a lot of ideas, thoughts, and discussions ongoing out there. The country is clearly on a downward slope in terms of health and a change is needed. The question is, what? Discuss. Debate. Let's see if we can come up with some sort of consensus.
    People have to rethink what the role of government should be...

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    There's been too much mis and disinformation in the last few decades, it will be a long time before the U.S. gets healthy.

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    Quote Originally Posted by fiercehunter View Post
    There's been too much mis and disinformation in the last few decades, it will be a long time before the U.S. gets healthy.
    Too many powerful interests benefiting from the disinformation.

    The Federal Reserve and the Wars on Cholesterol and Health Freedom

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    I don't see any changes coming that will affect (effect) the average diet. Look at the size of sugary soft drinks today vs. 20 - 30 years ago. A 6oz bottle was standard, now we get 20oz bottle or the 32oz cup. Restaurants now have free refills - a "recent" concept. And everyone does not need a sports drink to mow the yard
    There are restaurants we go to whose plates look more like platters - and they are filled with food when you order a regular meal. And you have to eat it - you paid for it - it would be a shame to waste it.

    There is not much daily activity either. If we get exercise it's a planned event: go to the gym, play a sport, etc. Our children don't play sports like I used to do. Todays sports are organized and have adults running them. We used to just play baseball or basketball in the neighborhood unil it was time to go home. You exercised and didn't even know it.

    My point is there are a lot of obstacles to overcome before we change our habits and I just don't see it happening any time soon.

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    Quote Originally Posted by catdance62 View Post
    ONe problem is that Americans have the cheapest food on the planet. We spend only 5.6% of our income on food (food prepared at home, it's closer to 9% if you include food eaten out). The next closest country is Ireland at 7.5%. When you get to countries that have a population that has a small minority of obese people you will note that the percentage of income food is vastly higher. For example: Nigeria at 40%, Indonesia at 44% and Pakistan at 48%. Although the table i was looking at does not include extremely poor countries like Mali and Chad, I am sure the percentage is much much higher, therefore there would be far less obese people. Americans do not value food. If food was a valued commodity, people would surely make better food choices.
    Here is the table I was referring to ERS/USDA Briefing Room - Food CPI and Expenditures: 2008 Table 97
    The key pertaining to the item in bold is, how it's valued. I don't think Americans DON'T value food; they just put a different value, or have a different interest in it. I know my parents say organic is too expensive. On the surface, yes, the prices are indeed higher than inorganic counterparts. Now, I know many people already eat in a Primal/Paleo manner, here. I understand their concerns, because of the aforementioned. Further, some individuals have their family members eating that way, too. Because of this, it's totally understandable why some here buy less optimally raised meat.

    But, for the typical SAD-subscribing individual, or family, they can certainly eat better food, if they valued what they put into their bodies. The key, here, is WHAT. I know my parents buy typical staple food, but they also stock their freezer/fridge with processed, canned, and sugar-laden goods. I think they could take the next step, if they only buy those things on the day of consumption.
    If you have a problem with what you read: 1. Get a dictionary 2. Don't read it 3. Grow up 4. After 3, go back to 1/ or 2. -- Dennis Blue. | "I don't care about your opinion, only your analysis"- Professor Calabrese. | "Life is more important than _______" - Drew | I eat animals that eat vegetables -- Matt Millen, former NFL Linebacker. | "This country is built on sugar & shit that comes in a box marinated in gluten - abc123

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    Quote Originally Posted by js290 View Post
    Shut down the USDA and FDA.



    Who do you trust to make the best choice for yourself?



    If the metrics of success are correct, that may provide the right incentive.



    People have to rethink what the role of government should be...
    I agree with these. I just got off the phone, having spoken with my folks. They were very concerned over my fasting practices. They still remember the diabetic reading via urinalysis; and decidedly used it in prosecution against my fasting. Even when I tried alleviating concerns over my ability to know when I'm hungry, and when I'm not, they still have a cloud of concern - citing low blood sugar, thus passing out. I even told them, I don't even take in that much sugar, in general; and conceded I may intake too much protein.. But, even then, they suggested I go through a diabetes educational workshop; or, something of such a nature.. The corn, soy, and other lobbyists do have the government wrapped around their little finger(s).
    If you have a problem with what you read: 1. Get a dictionary 2. Don't read it 3. Grow up 4. After 3, go back to 1/ or 2. -- Dennis Blue. | "I don't care about your opinion, only your analysis"- Professor Calabrese. | "Life is more important than _______" - Drew | I eat animals that eat vegetables -- Matt Millen, former NFL Linebacker. | "This country is built on sugar & shit that comes in a box marinated in gluten - abc123

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