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  1. #21
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    There was an article on BBC website yesterday about an group in Azerbaijan that have a high number of people who live to be over 100, or at least claim to be (regardless, they are really old) and live quite well and are still active. Lemme find it. It doesn't say anything about their diet though.

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  2. #22
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    http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/europe/8550374.stm


    There. It's about the Talysh people. They are not living so long anymore, but historically they tend to live a very long time.

    Check out my blog!

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    I like to throw, squat and pull heavy things for fun.

    We're designed to be hunters and we're in a society of shopping. There's nothing to kill anymore, there's nothing to fight, nothing to overcome, nothing to explore. In that societal emasculation this everyman is created. ~David Fincher, director of Fight Club, interview with Gavin Smith, "Inside Out," Film Comment, Sep/Oct 1999

  3. #23
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    Dr. Harris answered this question over at PaNu.


    http://www.paleonu.com/panu-weblog/2...comment6793717


  4. #24
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    Having lived in Japan for 4 years I can tell you that although they may live longer, they tend not to age very well and have all sorts of bone conditions.


    I think it was Art DeVany who did an article about how old wild animals die. Their decline from health to death is quite short. They don't experience the slow, gradual descent into debilitation that we do.

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  5. #25
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    Willcox BJ, Willcox DC, Suzuki M. The OkinawaProgram. New York, NY: Potter Publishers;2001


    "The researchers, Willcox etal did not attribute this superior health to genetics because when younger Okinawans migrate to mainland Japan, Hawaii, or the United States, they soon acquire the chronic diseases of the host population."


    It's not what they eat. It's what they don't eat(SAD).


  6. #26
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    Theres a book and website called Bluezones which details the diets and lifestyles of longlived cultures. I suggest people check it out


  7. #27
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    Whatever the reason some of us can handle more carbs and more different foods than others.


    My husband feels pretty feeble when he eats too much protein and not enough carbs--I on the other hand am opposite. He is the anti-Primal guy, basically, and seems built to thrive on the agricultural grain based model.


    Genetics?

    He has scots, german and eastern european (asiatic) ancestry. Jury's out, but he thrives on oats and cabbage, although not at the same time. He is also addicted to dairy--full fat dairy. Rarely gets sick and has fought off a case of beef related food poisoning that would have killed someone else (this may be why he is not so keen on meat!)


    Environment?

    He grew up in a rural area in Canada with access to a lot of whole healthy foods--being well nourished in a balanced way as a kid might affect how adult body responds. He was exposed to a lot of different germs and whatnot on his grandparents farm, etc. etc. hence ability to fight ecoli?

    Drank raw milk as a kid. His mother is a killer baker, but he can have one piece of pie and "be done".

    Fast food very very limited as a kid... McD's maybe once every 3 months.


    I really think different diets suit different body types. That is why being evangelical about primal, or CW or whatever is pointless. I am certain primal works well for me, but that is because my body type finds carbs an erratic form of energy and really mess me up. When I was younger this was not the case...but now it is.


    You really just have to be attentive to your body's responses to different foods and adjust according. What works for one body may not for another.


  8. #28
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    Read this (title: How to Eat Grains):

    http://wholehealthsource.blogspot.com/2009/01/how-to-eat-grains.html


    And when you are done, read the rest of the blog, it is brilliant.

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    Current weight (01/2012): 127 lb (57.5 kg)

  9. #29
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    I apologize if someone already mentioned it here, but Sean40, if it is self-education you're after, a very good source on this subject would be Gary Taube's Good Calorie, Bad Calorie book.

    He provides a lot of information on different cultures, their diets, and the effects of those diets on longevity and overall health.

    There's also a ton of other very interesting information in there, so it would be a good read all-around.


  10. #30
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    I've indeed looked into this, and it seems that most "blue zone" long lived cultures indeed have a history of a diet heavy on animal sourced foods, some calorie restriction (hard times) and a simple way of life. It is only since WW2 and European occupation (Japan, China, etc) that grains have become a staple of their diet. And it is with this new reliance on grains, that their longevity is shortening.


    Gonna have to stay a skeptic on this one. If there are any cultures relying heavily on grains and attaining long life, it would be in spite of the grain consumption (and thanks to calorie restriction, whole foods, lack of sugar, lack of veggie/seed oils) not due to it.


    The Med Diet as reported by Ancel Keyes and followers was low fat, high in grains/bread/pasta. This is at odds from the traditionally eaten pork, fish, fowl, high fat dairy, goat, etc.


    It is hard to reconcile a visitor with a bias reporting on a culture's nutrition over a short time, in an isolated region and arrive at a conclusion that supports what they went looking for!


    At least rice and corn are non-gluten grains, and white polished rice would be mostly a starch supply, not chuck full of poisons that whole wheat gluten grains and brown rice would have.


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