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Thread: Grass Fed Butter in Scotland/UK page

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    oliviascotland's Avatar
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    Grass Fed Butter in Scotland/UK

    Just to say for those in Scotland (I'm not sure about the rest of the UK!) that Grahams Dairies butters are from grass (silage in the winter) fed cows, as confirmed by their Technical Director:

    "All milk supplied to Grahams Dairies is from Herds that are farm assured which are from grass fed cows which are predominantly outside grazing but in the harsh winter months they will be fed on silage."

    Whilst I do like the Kerrygold butter, it is a little heavily salted for my tastes, and this gives a further string to the bow for those who prefer an unsalted/lightly salted option.

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    Lewis's Avatar
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    I've seen Graham's milk in England, but never the butter.

    I believe Yeo Valley butter is from grass-fed cows (and ones specifically on organic pasture). That seems fairly widely available, e.g. in Sainsburys.

    There's also Rachel's Dairy. That was a Welsh-owned firm, but has now been bought our by a U.S. company. However, it still seems to be Welsh cattle grazing

    freely in pastures rich in lush green grass and clover, untreated with any artificial fertilizers or pesticides
    Rachel's Organic - Milk, Cream & Butter - Semi-skimmed Milk

    The Rachel's products are available in Wales and in England -- e.g. in Waitrose.


    I think on the whole cattle (and other livestock) are less intensively farmed in Britain and Ireland (and New Zealand) than in the U.S. They tend not to state "grass fed" on labels for the British market, however, because consumers in Britain aren't specifically looking for those words -- I guess on account that Paleo, and awareness of the whole omega-3/6 issue, has not made as big inroads in Britain as it has in the U.S. Kerrygold, as far as I know, not only use milk only from grass-fed cows, but say they only use the summer milk (which has a higher vitamin content) for the butter. I don't think Kerrygold bother to state that the cows are grass-fed on the labels in Britain though.
    Last edited by Lewis; 05-08-2012 at 01:51 PM. Reason: spelling

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    DinoHunter's Avatar
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    I get my butter from a local Dairy
    Its totally diffrent from the comercial butters you get in the shops,,
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    Our supermarket has started stocking Graham's organic double cream. Hooray! (Also Yeo Valley double cream but that's more expensive.)

    Yeo Valley also does a very nice full-fat natural yoghurt.

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    Hi, Kerrygold in the UK is actually the only one I have seen so far in supermarkets that specifically states that the cows are grass-fed: 'Our farmers are proud of their deliciously creamy butter - made softer with the help of our grass fed cows'. I believe the unsalted one has been discontinued, however, and replaced with a 'lighter' variant, but I haven't seen that on the shelves yet (not that I would buy it, anyway).

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    Dragon butter is also grass fed....emailed them and they confirmed..seems they are also now going to state that on their packs too.

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    in the u.s., we can still get the unsalted kerrygold and it's nice because it's also fermented.

    so they do still make it.
    As I ate the oysters with their strong taste of the sea and their faint metallic taste that the cold white wine washed away, leaving only the sea taste and the succulent texture, and as I drank their cold liquid from each shell and washed it down with the crisp taste of the wine, I lost the empty feeling and began to be happy and to make plans.

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    http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread55928.html - Not everyone agreed with me, but what I found out about the UK organic standard was enough for me to feel organic was good enough in terms of grass fed. Check out the link.

    Hope this helps.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tricky View Post
    http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread55928.html - Not everyone agreed with me, but what I found out about the UK organic standard was enough for me to feel organic was good enough in terms of grass fed. Check out the link.

    Hope this helps.
    Thanks, this was useful for me. Good enough for me too, and certainly here in Northern Ireland all cows are definitely grass fed at the moment! (I guess it changes over the winter)

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    Yay, people living in Scotland! This always excites me! I love Graham's stuff I normally buy it, I am not as struct on the grass fed thing but it feels good I was already eating it!

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