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Thread: Kefir and sugar content page

  1. #1
    keevelish's Avatar
    keevelish is offline Senior Member
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    Kefir and sugar content

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    I'm trying to figure this out: bottles of plain whole milk kefir list 12 grams of sugar. But if the kefir bacterial cultures consume the lactose in the milk, why the sugar listed on the label? As far as I know, 12 grams is pretty much the sugar content of 8 oz of straight up milk.

    I make my own raw milk kefir so I can only go by commercial labels for nutritional info.

  2. #2
    zizou's Avatar
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    To get people to buy your product, sugar is your best bet. I drink homemade kefir, and believe me it doesn't taste sweet. I don't know how much sugar is in it but i doubt highly it would be 12g per 250ml.

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    keevelish's Avatar
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    I've had plain whole milk store bought kefir and that stuff isn't sweet either. Just like plain yogurt isn't (which also has 12 grams carbohydrate listed). I just looked up the nutritional content for whole milk and yep, it's 12 grams carbohydrate.

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    keevelish's Avatar
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    Could this 12 grams listed be the original lactose amount, without taking into account that the bacteria consumes it? Same goes for yogurt.

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    I make my own raw milk kefir too. I set the milk out for 12 hours to let it naturally ferment. I don't add any cultures because I don't mind the sour taste. How do you make yours?

    thanks

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    akmeg's Avatar
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    I've always wondered this! I've been making my own kefir for 5 years, and I'd love to know exactly how much the sugar content changes as the milk cultures!

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    Quote Originally Posted by keevelish View Post
    Could this 12 grams listed be the original lactose amount, without taking into account that the bacteria consumes it? Same goes for yogurt.
    yes indeed! re. yogurt, there's a lot less bacterial activity in most brands than in kefir.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jackson44 View Post
    I make my own raw milk kefir too. I set the milk out for 12 hours to let it naturally ferment. I don't add any cultures because I don't mind the sour taste. How do you make yours?

    thanks
    I'm interested in this....I just got a gallon of raw. First time ever. I know as far as "kefir" is concerned it is fermented with "kefir grains" that have something like up to 30 different bacteria and yeast to do it. The way you are describing would only allow the bacteria present in your raw milk to proliferate. I would assume this would lead to less biodiversity in the different types of bacteria present in the end product. Probably closer to the number (up to like 5) present in yogurt. TBH I'm not sure how many are present in raw milk? Anyone know for certain?

  9. #9
    keevelish's Avatar
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    yes indeed! re. yogurt, there's a lot less bacterial activity in most brands than in kefir.

    Cool. I kinda figured it was the original lactose amount. Nutrition labels are so inconclusive, lol.

    To make my raw kefir I put my grains and the amount of milk I want in a jar and set it on the counter. The goal is to finagle the amount of grains you have to milk amount so that it's all finished when 24 hours is up: that's the ideal length of time for fermentation. You know it's done when you see clear separation of whey to milk solids. Then strain, and repeat with new milk for another 24 hour batch.

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