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    tfarny's Avatar
    tfarny is offline Senior Member
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    100 mile hikers?

    Primal Fuel
    Planning to do about 100 miles in the Oregon backcountry with a buddy on the PCT this August. Anybody on here done a good long walk before? Recommended PCT sections? I've gone that distance but it was in Nepal, stayed at little villages though, so I didn't have to pack much. Also I was 14 years younger!
    If you are new to the PB - please ignore ALL of this stuff, until you've read the book, or at least http://www.marksdailyapple.com/primal-blueprint-101/ and this (personal fave): http://www.archevore.com/get-started/

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    Forever Young's Avatar
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    No I've not done anything near that much but it sounds like an awesome plan you have there!! That should be really cool.

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    Coach Palfrey's Avatar
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    I'm planning the Lands End to Jon O' Groats walk here in the UK, sometime in 2013. That will be the longest I've attempted.

    Most of the prep I have done for long walks before has normally centred on making myself as comfortable as possible - making sure things don't rub, boots are well worn in, hydration stays up and I'm eating a fairly good diet.

    Would love to hear how you get on!

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    tfarny's Avatar
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    Thanks, maybe I'll post a bit about it when it's all done. My mom has a food dryer, so I can make primal-like food and dehydrate it for the trip. Including jerky from my Uncle's all-natural beef. The comfort thing is a tough balance between achieving a light pack weight and bringing soft, squishy things along, basically. Camping gear has made amazing progress though I'm starting to realize.
    If you are new to the PB - please ignore ALL of this stuff, until you've read the book, or at least http://www.marksdailyapple.com/primal-blueprint-101/ and this (personal fave): http://www.archevore.com/get-started/

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    I'll be doing the El Camino de Santiago in September across northern Spain, should take about 4 weeks hitting up local markets to stay primal, although a typical spanish pilgrim meal is meat, baguette and pasta.

    MEAT PLEASE

    how long should a 100 mile hike take you?

  6. #6
    Jen AlcesAlces's Avatar
    Jen AlcesAlces is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by tfarny View Post
    Thanks, maybe I'll post a bit about it when it's all done. My mom has a food dryer, so I can make primal-like food and dehydrate it for the trip. Including jerky from my Uncle's all-natural beef. The comfort thing is a tough balance between achieving a light pack weight and bringing soft, squishy things along, basically. Camping gear has made amazing progress though I'm starting to realize.
    That sounds like a great trip! I did about 100 miles thru the Wind River Range in WY last year, but only short trips since. I love backpacking... nothing quite like it.

    Do you know how many days you're going to hike? The dehydrated primal food sounds awesome... for a trip that length, it's cool you can bring stuff and not worry too much about shelf-life. The gear choices are so varied and depend so much on your budget and what sacrifices you are willing to make.... anyway, you seem to have anything under control.

    sbhikes has done the entire PCT (so I've read), so she could probably give you some personal experience on section hikes... which I'd also love to hear.

    Have fun!!!!
    Jen, former Midwesterner, living in the middle of nowhere.

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    tfarny's Avatar
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    Thinking now about caloric density - if it's all got to go on my back for a week or more, the food I take on this trip had better have a lot of calories per ounce. Some foods I want to include that are not the standard dehydrated chili mac:
    coconut cream
    Almond butter
    Powdered Whole Milk (no, it's not primal)
    Whey powder (maybe Mark's brand)
    dry salami
    cheese (hard or firm, eat on day 1 / 2)
    EVOO in a silicone jar (pour over dinners)
    What am I missing?
    If you are new to the PB - please ignore ALL of this stuff, until you've read the book, or at least http://www.marksdailyapple.com/primal-blueprint-101/ and this (personal fave): http://www.archevore.com/get-started/

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    Fernaldo's Avatar
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    I like the foil packs of salmon (although a little heavy but pack like a dream) and good instant potatoes (if you can find them). Don't forget the jerky

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    Yeah, I hiked the whole PCT. I did Oregon in 2009. There are some HELLISH mosquitoes in Oregon. Never seen anything like that. Even met some people from Alaska who were shocked. They're snowmelt mosquitoes so if the snow is still melting, bring a head net (black is easier to see out of), a tent with a good zipper, long sleeves and pants, perhaps some light gloves (they ate my palms alive!) and if you can stand the chemicals, deet in a fogging can. At least bring a little bit of deet so you can poop in peace.

    The Sisters area was gorgeous. There's a really cool moonscape of volcanic rock you get to walk through north of Sisters, but beyond that it's got a lot of burned areas. If you are hungry, make a detour to the Big Lake Youth Camp and have a meal. Breakfast was all you can eat for $6 when I was there. Eggs and fruit, no meat but for $6 who's complaining?

    The Jefferson Park area is really gorgeous, too, probably the prettiest part of Oregon. There's at least one somewhat scary glacial creek to cross, but it wasn't bad in July.

    If you hike in the Mt. Hood area, which is also really pretty, check out the all-you-can-eat breakfast buffet at the Timberline Lodge. If you are headed to Cascade Locks, don't miss the Eagle Creek alternate route. It's spectacular. There's also a view near Indian something campground north of Mt. Hood but south of Eagle Creek where you can see Mt. St. Helens, Rainier and Mt. Adams all at the same time.
    Female, 5'3", 49, Starting weight: 163lbs. Current weight: 135 (more or less).
    I can squat 180lbs, press 72.5lbs and deadlift 185lbs

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    sbhikes's Avatar
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    P.S. I forgot Crater Lake. That's also really nice, as is Mt. Thielsen north of there. But the southern portion of Oregon wasn't quite as spectacular as the stuff further north.
    Female, 5'3", 49, Starting weight: 163lbs. Current weight: 135 (more or less).
    I can squat 180lbs, press 72.5lbs and deadlift 185lbs

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