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Thread: "Cooling Inflammation" Guy Insists on the Importance of Bacteria Again page

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    Lewis's Avatar
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    "Cooling Inflammation" Guy Insists on the Importance of Bacteria Again

    He's saying again that he thinks most of the problem is down to "missing bacteria". Interesting stuff, whether he's right or not:

    Food intolerance is based on missing bacteria in the the gut rather than inadequacy of human enzymes, e.g. lactase, or altered immune system.

    I make the extreme statement that food intolerance is not genetic, to emphasize that the vast majority of intolerance can be cured by changing the bacterial composition of the gut's microbiological community, the gut flora, rather than attempting to accommodate a permanent deficiency ...
    Cooling Inflammation: Genetics of Food Intolerance

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    I don't have the brain power to really read this right now, but definitely interesting. Is he suggesting you could "cure" lactose intolerance? By that effect, it would imply that the large number of people with lactose intolerance are simply not passing along the appropriate bacteria, so it's not "genetic", but simply a missing agent in development. Theoretically, could a lactose intolerant person take the appropriate probiotics, yogurt, whatever, while pregnant, and their child would not be intolerant? An iffy experiment if the person was "too" intolerant, probably don't want pregnant ladies getting diarrhea constantly.
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    Lactose intolerance can be mediated slightly by taking probiotics, but if you already have crap bacteria inhabiting most of your innards then there's not much of a chance of the good stuff sticking. Interestingly enough the big one, gluten intolerance can also be mediated by probiotics. Certain strains (can't recall specifically which ones) affect zonulin which controls the permeability of your intestinal walls.

    As far as hereditary goes, the most important probiotic a human ever gets is in their first breast feeding. This is when the mother lays down the colonies that will start the kid on their symbiotic journey.
    "You can demonstrate the purpose and limits of human digestion with a simple experiment: eat a steak with some whole corn kernels, and see what comes out the other end. It won’t be the steak."
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    Lactose intolerance could also be reduced considerably by consuming raw dairy.

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    Quote Originally Posted by namelesswonder View Post
    Is he suggesting you could "cure" lactose intolerance? By that effect, it would imply that the large number of people with lactose intolerance are simply not passing along the appropriate bacteria, so it's not "genetic", but simply a missing agent in development.
    As I read it he's saying that lactose intolerance is a special case and a bit more complex than some other problems. He's saying that some people have the genetic advantage that they can actually utilize lactose for energetic purposes. (He says just as if it were glucose.) That is genetic, and a heck of an advantage in survival terms. If you're, say, an African herder and gave the right genetics, you can get nourishment off your cattle's milk, where other people who didn't couldn't.

    However, he's also saying that no-one's stomach need be upset by lactose. If you can't utilize it for energetic purposes (because you lack the genetics) you should still be able to fully digest it. In this case you (or rather the right bacteria if you have them) merely treat it "as a soluble fiber". You don't get the energy use, but you don't get a gut ache.

    Theoretically, could a lactose intolerant person take the appropriate probiotics, yogurt, whatever, while pregnant, and their child would not be intolerant? An iffy experiment if the person was "too" intolerant, probably don't want pregnant ladies getting diarrhea constantly.
    I suppose a lactose intolerant person -- say this pregnant woman -- lacks the right bacteria for one of two reasons. Either because they aren't in her particular environment, or because they've been "knocked out". Maybe the first case would be if one lives in a hunter-gatherer culture that doesn't use yoghurt or cheese, and maybe the second might occur with over-use of antibiotics.

    As you probably know the foetus has a sterile gut and gains bacteria during and after birth. (The first dose comes when passing through the birth canal, as the baby swallow fluid.) Sure, the baby is going to be either more or less intolerant to what's in its environment (including foods) based on what the mother can handle -- because the baby effectively inherits the mother's gut flora.

    I don't know about what a pregnant mother should best do. Ideally, I guess she should get her gut flora in order before conception. Dr. Natasha Campbell-McBride has a chapter in her book specifically on pre- and post- conception and birth for women. So I guess she has some opinions on the matter, and presumably experience with patients to go on:

    http://www.amazon.com/Gut-Psychology...dp/0954852028/

    Among other things she says women in some traditional societies prepare for birth by making sure the flora in the birth canal is good order, and they do that by applying yoghurt to the genital area. I guess that would be one of these cases where they don't understand fully what they're doing in scientific terms, but they know what works.

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