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Thread: Ideas for Daycare? page

  1. #1
    femininefigure's Avatar
    femininefigure is offline Junior Member
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    Primal Blueprint Expert Certification


    I had a previous post about daycare, but now have some more questions.


    I am switching daycare providors for various reasons (won't get into here). I love everything about this daycare EXCEPT the food menu. It is horrendous. Muffin tops for snack, gardettos, ritz crackers, barely any protein, you get the idea. I'm sure it is "balanced" according to the food pyramid, but I digress.


    Anyway, I obviously want to bring my own food. I asked the director about it when I was on a tour, and she said that's fine for when he's an infant (he's 9 months now) but I'd need a "reason" - religous or health to adjust the menu. She said I can just cross out items that I'd like him to not have.


    Well, pretty much NOTHING on the list is something I'd give my son.


    Now, my question is, I think it could be workable if I bring his own food if it needs absolutely no preparation. Ideas? Is there a way to bring warm food and keep it warm? Or what are some food ideas for cold lunches and snacks for kids? I imagine this problem goes into school, but I'm a little stumped.


    And I need to come up with a "reason." I guess I understand that they don't want the extra hassle--they want more time to spend caring for the kids rather than food prep. But what can I do to present them that this is going to be easier for them?


  2. #2
    NZPixie's Avatar
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    Can he feed himself? How many meals is he going to eat at daycare?


    I would make up cheese (if you do dairy), chopped soft fruits, yoghurt (again if you do dairy), pureed nut bars (so can't choke on the nuts), chopped cooked vegetables he can manage. I guess it just depends on how they are going to feed him? Plop him in a highchair and leave him to it or what?


  3. #3
    femininefigure's Avatar
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    Right now he can feed himself somewhat at home, but I don't think it would be foods I'd like others to feed him as I keep a better eye out for choking. At home, I give him strings of chicken, beef, whatever, and he can sort of eat them. Otherwise I hand feed him. I send homemade purees to daycare.


    I'm just looking for low-no maintenance (i.e. no reheating or prep) items to bring for him.


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    frogfarm's Avatar
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    They said "religious or health", right? So you say "health" and leave it at that!


  5. #5
    Brewtality's Avatar
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    He is glutten intolerant, and borderline diabetic. Throw in a word like Fraxion's disease (completely made up name) Just tell them his diet is per doctor's orders, and they will be more than happy to accomodate the poor child.


    Write it out on a piece of paper, and sign a random phonebook name to it if you have to. They will beleive it, people want to believe you.


  6. #6
    maba's Avatar
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    You could use this letter to explain why you don't want your child to eat certain foods:

    http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum...-to-pre-school

  7. #7
    anniegebel's Avatar
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    Brewtality...you're funny! I agree with what frogfarm said, though...health reasons, period. His body won't digest the foods they're offering as well as it will the ones you'll bring him.


    It seems to me that they could, and probably would, reheat things as long as it's not a multi-step sort of meal. There are lots of things, though, that are just as good cold. I didn't even know about PB when my first two were toddlers, but I wanted to make my own foods for them...in the process I found a lot that I (and they) like cold.


    steam carrots or broccoli over broth...eat warm or cold, no choking hazzard once steamed


    meat (meatloaf, chicken)...1st grader will sometimes take the leftover meat from dinner the night before and have it cold for lunch the next day. If you cut it prior to taking it in it should be good to go


    http://www.wholesomebabyfood.com/ <--this is a site I got lots of info from, remember it&#39;s not primal, so it&#39;ll need some adjusting


    and two of my favorite finger foods for my kids were avocado and banana.


    Also, I&#39;d say to remember that he doesn&#39;t need to eat "balanced" meals every meal and snack time either. So if he&#39;s not getting everything you want him to in daycare, because you can&#39;t figure a way to get it there easily, then you know he&#39;ll get it at home before or after daycare.


  8. #8
    femininefigure's Avatar
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    Also, at the school you are allowed to bring in birthday treats. This isn&#39;t an issue at his age, but will be as he gets older. I don&#39;t want him to feel "left out" especially since this would be a rare occassion (1x/month? at most with the ratios). Of course the food has to be "prepackaged."


  9. #9
    femininefigure's Avatar
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    I like the idea for the letter, though right now it may not be necessary. In the "crawler" room, parents are expected to bring their own food. It is only when they are toddlers that they are to eat the facility&#39;s food.


    It seems like this daycare has never been challenged on the notion of someone bringing in their own food. They supposedly make adaptations for those with allergies, but because about 5% of the menu is actually acceptable to me, I doubt they could accommodate me.


    Now, my baby is the most easygoing, pleasant baby---I&#39;ve been told this many, many times by different care providers. He hardly cries, he laughs at everything, yadda yadda. So rather than bringing it up now, perhaps I should wait until they want him to transition to table food, right? They&#39;ll see that whatever I&#39;m doing "works" and certainly makes their job easer.


  10. #10
    OnTheBayou's Avatar
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    Say, isn&#39;t your family a member in The Most High Church of Grok?


    You could aim to cut the worst and allow bits of the lesser evils.


    "We do not eat grains or grain products like oils." That would also eliminate things like foods fried in most oils. Maybe allow some peanut butter or other nut butters, there are lots of worse things.


    Something like that.


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