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Thread: What happens to extra dietary cholesterol? Xanthoma question. page

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    rkd80's Avatar
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    What happens to extra dietary cholesterol? Xanthoma question.

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    Hey guys,

    So I eat about 2,000-3,000 mg of cholesterol a day according to cronometer. Sources are pastured eggs, grass-fed beef and wild salmon. Normally I would not even be asking this question, but I am noticing some white spots under my eyes. I have a co-worker at work (he eats like crap), but has a pretty bad case of xanthoma - and had them ever since I knew him (5+ years).

    I am kind of freaking out because the last thing I need is this nasty stuff under my eyes, I have enough problems as it is.

    So since dietary cholesterol is generally regarded as a non-issue, I am asking what happens to the extra stuff that the body does not need. Assuming with his dietary intake the liver no longer produces as much as it used to, but if the daily "requirement" is about 3 g or so one could easily "go over". Does it go in the toilet..or?

    Any other ideas as to what may be these white spots under my eyes?

    thanks!

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    Is your problem Milia? I have had this all my life.
    Milia in Adults: Condition, Treatment and Pictures - Overview | skinsight

    I went to the eye doctor the other day and he said I have Arcus Senilis, which is cholesterol rings around the cornea. I guess that's one place the body stores extra cholesterol. He said it is not necessarily a biomarker of anything.
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    Yeah that looks very similar, but mine are much smaller I suppose. Issue is, I could have sworn they came recently...could one's diet affect the Milia?

    As far as the Arcus Senilis...my actual eyes look fine.

    Xanthoma appears to be a different beast all together then, look up some pictures - not pretty.

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    The wikipedia article is quite informative:

    Cholesterol - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Lack of phytosterols in your diet that block absorption of dietary cholesterol could be a contributing factor. Olive oil, coconut oil, broccoli, avocados, beetroot, brussels sprouts and oranges are good primal sources of phytosterols.

    Unfortunately, by avoiding grains and other toxic foods we are eliminating many good sources of phytosterols.

    Sources Of Phytosterols | LIVESTRONG.COM

    ETA: the liver excretes cholesterol into the digestive tract via the bile ducts. Hence increasing your intake of phytosterols also assists in preventing reabsorption.
    Last edited by paleo-bunny; 04-18-2012 at 08:08 AM. Reason: ETA
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    I don't really know what affects Milia. I have had it my entire life, from childhood as long as I can possibly remember, and during that time I've eaten many kinds of diets. My grandmother was merciless in her negative commentary, telling me it was because I was dirty and didn't wash. I have always been deeply ashamed of my eyes because of this. I once went to the dermatologist to have them removed, but that's where I learned it makes no difference to have them removed because they come and go on their own. Thankfully the dermatologist also told me they are not caused by a lack of cleanliness. They are hard and when one finally is ready, it comes out as a hard, white, round bit. But new ones are always at the ready.

    Anyway, I looked up Xanthoma and they looked reddish in color so that is why I thought maybe you had Milia. Not that this answers at all your other question about what the body does with extra cholesterol.
    Female, 5'3", 49, Starting weight: 163lbs. Current weight: 135 (more or less).
    Starting squat: 45lbs. Heaviest squat: 180 x 2. Heaviest Deadlift: 230 x 2

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    I have a pretty steady intake of olive oil + coconut oil + brococoli + avocados.

    Recommended intake:
    "guidelines recommend doses of phytosterols in the 1.6-3.0 grams".

    That is kind of crazy, I don't come anywhere close to that with daily intake somewhere in the 40-50mg according to cronometer. Then again it is listing avocados as containing 0...
    Last edited by rkd80; 04-18-2012 at 12:41 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by rkd80 View Post
    I have a pretty steady intake of olive oil + coconut oil + brococoli + avocados.

    Recommended intake:
    "guidelines recommend doses of phytosterols in the 1.6-3.0 grams".
    I suggest you to get a detailed breakdown of your blood cholesterol. I don't know how reliable xanthoma is as an indicator of a problem with blood cholesterol. There are genetic and environmental factors at play, including your liver function (there's a big turnover of cholesterol in the liver, which is a major contributing factor), also triglyceride levels, which can be elevated by fructose intake.

    Bear in mind that this could be a temporary phenomenon as your body adjusts to a higher intake of dietary cholesterol.
    F 5 ft 3. HW: 196 lbs. Primal SW (May 2011): 182 lbs (42% BF)... W June '12: 160 lbs (29% BF) (UK size 12, US size 8). GW: ~24% BF - have ditched the scales til I fit into a pair of UK size 10 bootcut jeans. Currently aligning towards 'The Perfect Health Diet' having swapped some fat for potatoes.

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    will do!

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    Probably recycled to the liver. That's what HDL is for. It carries cholesterol back to the liver.


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