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    scubasam's Avatar
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    High Glucose Levels Post CF?

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    I have TIIDM and Hashimotos and my fasting levels are between 125-130 these days (down from around 150). I don't eat before I go (I am pretty much eating twice a day, lunch and dinner and am 90-95% Paleo).

    The past two days I've checked my glucose levels after my workouts and before I eat and they have been 164-170. It makes no sense because exercise is meant to bring your levels down, but mine are going up and I checked 3 times to make sure it is not the test strips.

    Has anyone dealt with this before? Ideas to fix it? I think this may be why my weight loss is so slow (down 14.7 lbs in the last 11 weeks since starting CF).

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    Linny's Avatar
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    I think it's normal. The liver is likely dumping glucose into your blood stream to fuel your muscles. I'm pre-diabetic and I know even when I go for a walk my glucose goes up immediately after. Then over the hours following it comes back down quickly.

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    Thanks, apparently it is normal, especially for diabetics. I really don't want to lower my intensity of the CF workouts, but will talk to my trainers and doctor and see what they say.

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    Quote Originally Posted by scubasam View Post
    I have TIIDM and Hashimotos and my fasting levels are between 125-130 these days (down from around 150). I don't eat before I go (I am pretty much eating twice a day, lunch and dinner and am 90-95% Paleo).

    The past two days I've checked my glucose levels after my workouts and before I eat and they have been 164-170. It makes no sense because exercise is meant to bring your levels down, but mine are going up and I checked 3 times to make sure it is not the test strips.

    Has anyone dealt with this before? Ideas to fix it? I think this may be why my weight loss is so slow (down 14.7 lbs in the last 11 weeks since starting CF).
    What are your workouts consisting of?

    Heavy weight workouts typically raise hormones. If you are training completely fasted, you may be consuming muscle. Are you a chronic low-carber? If your glycogen stores are constantly depleted, your body is probably breaking down muscle into glucose to fuel your workouts - yet another reason not to eat a chronic low carbohydrate diet. You could try two things and see if it helps your blood glucose levels:

    1.) Stop eating so damn low carbohydrate. A serving of fruit or starch may keep your liver and muscle glycogen partially replete, allowing for better workout performance, less muscle catabolism and more stable blood sugars while fasting.
    2.) Take BCAA's 30 minutes pre-workout to spike your insulin and protect muscle during workouts.

    Low level cardio typically has the opposite effect on insulin and blood glucose, bottoming them out.

    You may want to consider carb cycling to improve your blood sugar numbers. On heavy lifting days, eat more fruit and safe starch to help improve your insulin sensitivity. Avoiding carbs promotes insulin resistance and could stand to hinder your recovery - it's hard to fix your glucose metabolism when you never exercise it. On days you don't lift, keep carbs very low and do some low level cardio to further bottom out insulin. You may want to get your body used to low levels of insulin and high levels of insulin in healthy patterns (i.e. no snacking and eating real, whole foods) to help improve your insulin sensitivity. Never spiking blood glucose or insulin gives your body little reason to fix that metabolic pathway. You'll have to experiment to find out what's too much or too little - no BG spikes hinder recovery, but too many BG spikes could as well. You could probably judge what's healthiest by your level of fatigue vs carb intake.
    Don't put your trust in anyone on this forum, including me. You are the key to your own success.

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    I am doing Cross Fit 4 times a week so the workouts vary from day to day, but they are always intense. I am also lifting and rowing on my own twice a week to strengthen my back and endurance for a challenge I am taking in 9 weeks

    I am pretty low carb, but would not consider myself a chronic low carber (I eat between 50-75g carbs per day on average, some days are less but I never eat over 75g). I have to keep the carbs low to lose weight and because of the diabetes. I am fasting before training because it works best for me. There are days I eat in the mornings, just not usually before a workout (don't want to meet pukie and I'm just not hungry).

    All the research I have read points to carbs hindering insulin resistance, not helping it. I would like to see the research you are referring to because maybe I am looking in the wrong places.

    Thanks for the responses.

    Sam

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    I eat some carbohydrate before exercise to avoid this effect.
    __________________________
    age 56, type 2 diabetes, swimmer
    low carb since 2006 thanks to Jenny, primal since Jan. 2012

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    How much do you weigh and why do you feel your weight loss has been slow?

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    The lactate that your muscles produce anaerobically from their stored glycogen gets shuttled to your liver which then promptly turns it back to glucose and puts it back into your bloodstream. The muscles, through exercise, will become more insulin sensitive over time and then the glucose will go back into those cells, limiting your blood glucose increase. Your cells need time to repair/reset their sensitivities. I suggest you keep eating low carb and track these changes over time.

    mommymd

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    @Dave, I am very overweight and have been at this for 11-12 weeks now with a net weight loss of 15 lbs. Most people I know who start paleo and CF lose 15-30 lbs in the first 4-6 weeks.

    @MommyMD, thanks. I will keep it up and keep tracking.

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    I've read that exercising before eating will give you lower fasting blood sugars. Exercising after your meal will help burn off the carbs/sugars of that meal - but will not help to lower your fasting numbers.

    It seems to be true in my case. I do better with exercising in a fasted state.

    If you eat too much protein, it will keep your numbers up. It seems a lot of diabetics on this diet/way of eating think they can consume endless amounts of meat - not true at all.

    Not that you are, it just seems to be something common.

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