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Thread: Thoughts on MSG? page

  1. #1
    Goldensparrow's Avatar
    Goldensparrow is offline Senior Member
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    Thoughts on MSG?

    How bad is it? I know it creates some of an insulin response, but if the rest of my diet is pretty strict, is it going to matter? It seems to be in some seasoning mix that I would like to get. Thanks.

  2. #2
    NWPrimate's Avatar
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    MSG is nasty stuff. It was actually one of the first catalysts that got me eating clean food.
    We decided to avoid any foods that had MSG (several years ago) and you would be amazed how few processed foods you can still get into your shopping cart when you follow this rule.

    Also watch out for autolyzed yeast extract, and a dozen other names for it.
    Hidden Sources of MSG


  3. #3
    otzi's Avatar
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    If you are just trying to lose weight, eat all you want. If you want to get healthy and eat only good food, don't touch it. I haven't had any MSG, that I know of, in years. Sometimes it gets snuck in on you, which is why I go out of my way to not intentionally eat it. It's officially an excitotoxin--look it up.

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    Lily Marie's Avatar
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    Seasoning mixes are way too easy to mix yourself. Don't eat the MSG.

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    adamm's Avatar
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    Does anyone have any studies which actually show that MSG is nasty? What exactly it does to the body?

    --Me

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    Daemonized's Avatar
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    MSG gives me a headache. I rubbed some ribs with some MSG laden rub a couple years ago and the ensuing headache was all it took to convince to avoid the stuff ever since.

  9. #9
    Forever Young's Avatar
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    It is a drug much like aspartame. It tricks the brain into thinking it tastes good. It is hard to avoid if you ever eat out at any of the big chains etc. But to use it in your own food is absurd. Get real organic spices. You can't go wrong with that approach. The lifestyle is about eliminating ALL drugs from your life.

  10. #10
    otzi's Avatar
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    Keep in mind, MSG is a multi-billion dollar business. Adding MSG to food literally addicts people to that food. I think it will eventually be banned, but for now it makes too much money.

    For more studies, go to Google Scholar and type in something like "monosodium glutamate excitotoxin"


    from: Monosodium glutamate raises antral distension and plasma amino acid after a standard meal in humans -- Boutry et al. 300 (1): G137 -- Science Signaling
    Abstract: The consumption of monosodium glutamate (MSG) is advocated to elicit physiological and metabolic effects, yet these effects have been poorly investigated directly in humans and in particular in the postprandial phase. Thirteen healthy adults were supplemented for 6 days with a nutritional dose of MSG (2 g) or sodium chloride (NaCl) as control, following a crossover design. On the 7th day, they underwent a complete postprandial examination for the 6 h following the ingestion of the same liquid standard meal (700 kcal, 20% of energy as [15N]protein, 50% as carbohydrate, and 30% as fat) supplemented with MSG or NaCl. Real-ultrasound measures of antral area indicated a significant increased distension for the 2 h following the meal supplemented with MSG vs. NaCl. This early postprandial phase was also associated with significantly increased levels of circulating leucine, isoleucine, valine, lysine, cysteine, alanine, tyrosine, and tryptophan after MSG compared with NaCl. No changes to the postprandial glucose, insulin, glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1, and ghrelin were noted between MSG- and NaCl-supplemented meals. Subjective assessments of hunger and fullness were neither affected by MSG supplementation. Finally, the postprandial fate of dietary N was identical between dietary conditions. Our findings indicate that nutritional dose of MSG promoted greater postprandial elevations of several indispensable amino acids in plasma and induced gastric distension. Further work to elucidate the possible sparing effect of MSG on indispensable amino acid first-pass uptake in humans is warranted. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00862017.


    From: Analysis of Monosodium l-Glutamate in Food Products by High-Performance Thin Layer Chromatography
    Monosodium L-glutamate (MSG), chemically known as 2-amino pentane dioic or 2-amino glutaric acid, is normally used as a flavor-enhancing ingredient more commonly used in traditional Asian cuisine. This stimulates specific receptors located in taste buds such as the amino acid receptor T1R1/T1R3or other glutamate receptors like the metabotropic receptors, which induce the taste known as umami. Only l-glutamate enantiomer has the flavor-enhancing properties. In 1959, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) classified monosodium glutamate as a “generally recognized as safe” substance. But in 1995, FDA Commissioned report acknowledged that an unknown percentage of the population may react to monosodium glutamate and develop monosodium glutamate symptom complex, a condition characterized by the following symptoms: headache, nausea, rapid heartbeat, bronchospasm, chest pain, drowsiness, weakness, and sweating.[1] Monosodium glutamate is absorbed very quickly in the gastrointestinal tract, so MSG could spike blood plasma levels of glutamate.[2] This is in a class of chemicals known as excitotoxins. High levels of which have been shown in animal studies to cause damage to areas of brain unprotected by the blood–brain barrier and that a variety of chronic diseases can arise out of this neurotoxicity.[3,4] Spectrophotometric,[5,6] derivative HPLC,[7] HPLC with UV detection, fluorescence detection,[8,9] GC,[10] paper chromatography,[11] and potentiometric methods[12] were reported for analysis of MSG in food products. In this paper, we report a new, rapid, sensitive, precise, and selective HPTLC method for the determination of MSG in food products.

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