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  1. #1
    breadsauce's Avatar
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    Buckwheat and soaking - question.

    Primal Fuel
    Hi. I have bought some buckwheat flour, as it is high in so many minerals - especially magnesium, potassium and manganese.

    Nutrition Facts and Analysis for Buckwheat flour, whole-groat

    However, it comes out as being highly inflammatory, which is not good.

    Would soaking the flour in whey, yoghurt or kefir overnight reduce the inflammatory effects and reduce physic acid etc etc?

    Thanks.
    Last edited by breadsauce; 04-10-2012 at 05:43 AM.

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    Hmm, interesting thought. Inflammation is due to lectin intolerance, right? I know that Oligasaccharides will prevent Lectins from binding to cell membranes, and that yogurt produces Oligasaccharides during fermentation. Am I following your train of thought here?

    Now, I don't know a lot about yeast in yogurt (or bread for that matter), I'm a mere beer nerd, but if there's enough active yeast residing in the yogurt culture:
    1) Is it in the proper stage of life to continue to ferment anything?
    2) Is it able to go from fermenting yogurt to fermenting Buckwheat? (In the beer world, you can't swap your yeast's fuel source)
    3) What is the timeframe required for existing/new Oligasaccharides to bind to lectin, and in what quantities?
    4) How is taste changed?
    5) Is active fermentation not required for Oligasaccharides to bind to lectins and render them "inert"?

    Or am I making a technical issue out of something non-technical?

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    I've read that soaking up to 24 hours does reduce the phytic acid.
    You lousy kids! Get off my savannah!

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    I wouldn't put too much weight on the inflammation rating on nutrition data. It's just an estimate given by a formula that is sometimes laughably inaccurate (check out the "anti-inflammatory" properties of corn/canola oil and the deadly inflammatory effects of beef tallow).

    But yes, soaking in whey is recommended for buckwheat. Check out Weston A. Price stuff for more info. Also:
    Heavenly Sourdough Buckwheat Pancakes

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    Or you could have baked halibut with pine nuts.
    Eating primal is not a diet, it is a way of life.
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    Don't forget to play!

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    God, I wished I could eat nuts...

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    Quote Originally Posted by yodiewan View Post
    I wouldn't put too much weight on the inflammation rating on nutrition data. It's just an estimate given by a formula that is sometimes laughably inaccurate (check out the "anti-inflammatory" properties of corn/canola oil and the deadly inflammatory effects of beef tallow).

    But yes, soaking in whey is recommended for buckwheat. Check out Weston A. Price stuff for more info. Also:
    Heavenly Sourdough Buckwheat Pancakes
    Thanks for that - the reassurance and the recipe! I want to make savoury pancakes / crepes, so I'll miss out the sweet things and add salt, and perhaps some herbs or celery seed.

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    onalark's Avatar
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    I make those pancakes every Saturday. I can attest to their yumminess.

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    Is the baking powder necessary?

    I have some groudn buckwheat flour at home, it's fine, so i don't know how i would soak it and then drain it without all the flour just going through the sieve?

    Or do you just use it soaked?

    I would really like to make thin pancakes or crepes to have some carbs for breakfast and to dip into creme kefir cheese or something.

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    onalark's Avatar
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    I use baking soda, not powder. I believe it is necessary if you want lift.

    I don't use buckwheat flour; I use raw groats. They're large enough that they don't slip through a mesh strainer when I rinse them. The rinsing is necessary.

    You can certainly try without the baking soda. I don't know what the effect will be, though. I suspect they will be very, very flat.

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