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Thread: Primal Rutabaga (Swede) Lasagne page

  1. #1
    Man of Kent's Avatar
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    Primal Rutabaga (Swede) Lasagne

    My fiance came up with this recipe, which was adapted from Martha's recipe for rutabaga (we call it swede in England)/carrot gratin. We tried it out last night and it was absolutely delicious!!

    Ingredients;

    Sauce;
    1 small shallot, sliced very thin
    1 teaspoon butter
    2/3 cup (180ml) double cream
    1/3 cup (90ml) milk
    4 cloves garlic, crushed
    50g grated cheddar

    Swede (rutabaga) pasta substitute;
    1 medium swede, sliced thinly.

    Bolognese;
    1tbs lard
    500g minced beef
    6 tomatoes
    1 onion
    2tbs basil

    Additional 50g cheese to grate onto the layers as you build the lasagne before going into the oven

    Method;
    • Melt the lard in a saucepan and fry the onion and then add mince and fry until it has browned
    • Add the tomatoes and basil to the saucepan and simmer until reduced


    • Meanwhile peel and slice the swede and then parboil for 12-15 mins, drain and leave to cool

    • Melt the butter in a saucepan gently fry the garlic and shallot then add the other sauce ingredients, heat until bubbling and then remove from heat

    • Put a sprinkling of grated cheddar on the bottom of a casserole dish
    • Place a layer of the bolognese on top of the grated cheddar in the casserole dish, followed by a layer of swede, a layer of gratin sauce and a sprinkling of grated cheese. Repeat until all the ingredients have been used. Finishing with grated cheese which will brown nicely.
    • Bake in an oven on gas mark 5 for approx 40 mins
    • Serve!

  2. #2
    patski's Avatar
    patski is offline Senior Member
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    This sounds fantastic! Thank you!!!
    A Post-Primal PrimalPat

    Do not allow yourself to become wrapped up in a food 'lifestyle'. That is ego, and you are not that.

  3. #3
    Goosejuggler's Avatar
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    Sounds delicious, this will be my dinner tonight!

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    Wonderful idea! How do you slice the swede finely?I find them very tough to deal with and any advice would be welcome!

  5. #5
    Man of Kent's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by breadsauce View Post
    Wonderful idea! How do you slice the swede finely?I find them very tough to deal with and any advice would be welcome!
    Thank you! You're right it is difficult to slice them finely but I find the best way is to cut the ends off the swede so that it has a flat surface to sit on the board and it won't move around as you cut it. Then starting with one side, hold it with your free hand to keep it steady but keep your fingers well away and just slice down through the swede as close to the edge and thinly as you can manage. Obviously you don't end up with uniformly sized slices due to the shape of the swede but this doesn't really matter. It also doesn't matter too much if you don't manage to get the slices really thin as the parboiling will make them nice and soft anyway. The original recipe for the gratin which was the inspiration doesn't actually mention parboiling first but we found that if you don't then it takes a very long time to cook the swede through in the oven and it won't be as soft and 'pasta like'.

  6. #6
    Goosejuggler's Avatar
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    This was great, it would also be a crowd-pleaser when your non-primal family come to visit.

    I made a few changes, I used two swedes (and, yeah, don't worry about the slices being perfect!) and snazzed up the white sauce with nutmeg, worchestshire sauce (sp?) and mustard

    Super yummy, but it's all eaten now

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by breadsauce View Post
    Wonderful idea! How do you slice the swede finely?I find them very tough to deal with and any advice would be welcome!
    I've got nothing to contribute to the discussion other than the fact that I, being an actual swede, find this comment to be hilariously disturbing. Maybe leave them out to thaw first, lol?

  8. #8
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    Just a note - rutabaga is a distinct vegetable, even here in the UK. Swede is swede. Rutabaga is rutabaga - think swede/daikon mixed together and that's rutabaga. Superb raw!

    Good fun, whichever veggie you end up with. I've used marrow before, which works well for a soft version. Great to see lard in the ingredient list.

  9. #9
    Man of Kent's Avatar
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    That's interesting I didn't realise they were a seperate vegetable, I don't think I've ever eaten rutabaga then. Thanks for correcting that! Interesting idea using the marrow too, looking forward to giving that a whirl.

  10. #10
    pjgh's Avatar
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    I wonder if it's one of those things like how turnips are often called swede. Thinking I was just having a special moment, I made a quick google and indeed, rutabaga pictures come up with pictures of what we call swede.

    The rutabaga I get from our local farm shop is white inside, slightly green perhaps, less dense and much more watery than swede. It is fine raw, grated, and a great alternative to potato for chips. The flavour is quite perfumed. Maybe these were quite young and would colour up and firm up with time.

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