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    Question Homemade Primal flour question

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    Years ago I came across a gold mind find in the form of an old electric stone grinding mill, with adjustable setting capability and can also be used w/o elecrticity if needed.

    So, with the shift to primal, there are some ethnic recipes I come across that call for some amout of flour, soups being a large amount of the recipes. What is the opinion of my fellow Groks on which is best/easiest/most effective and how to prepair the suggestions for grinding?

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    No flour. It's not primal. Might want to read the book again.

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    You could use it to make your own rice flour, if it works for that. It'd be much cheaper than buying the pre-ground stuff I bet.

    But yeah, wheat flour is off the menu, regardless of how fresh it is.

    You could also use it for buckwheat, although soaking it first is recommended (as for any whole grain... if you're going to eat them).

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    Sorry, noticed I forgot a few things in my primary post.

    First, I do not use flour in any capacity.

    I had heard of flours made from primal ingredients, such as almond, coconut, etc. This was where I was inquiring about the best option for recipes calling for flour/cornstarch.

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    You're probably not going to be able to make nut flours (thankfully because they're horrendous for health) or coconut flour because they're far too oily and require special grinders. Typically, fatty flours ruin grain mills - even oat flours are often too fatty for nut mills. IMO, you could do things like dehydrate sweet potatoes to grind into flour, or grind white rice into flour. Potato starch is a much better thickener than white rice flour is though because white rice flour is often sand-like whereas potato starch is exactly like cornstarch. You're really going to have to dehydrate those potatoes, though. You'd probably want to look up a tutorial somewhere. White potato starch is only around $4 for a 24oz bag, though, so I always have some on-hand, along with tapioca starch.
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    Thank you for the heads up. I think I will just accept either to avoid those recipes or that they will not be as thick as intended.

    Quote Originally Posted by ChocoTaco369 View Post
    You're probably not going to be able to make nut flours (thankfully because they're horrendous for health) or coconut flour because they're far too oily and require special grinders. Typically, fatty flours ruin grain mills - even oat flours are often too fatty for nut mills. IMO, you could do things like dehydrate sweet potatoes to grind into flour, or grind white rice into flour. Potato starch is a much better thickener than white rice flour is though because white rice flour is often sand-like whereas potato starch is exactly like cornstarch. You're really going to have to dehydrate those potatoes, though. You'd probably want to look up a tutorial somewhere. White potato starch is only around $4 for a 24oz bag, though, so I always have some on-hand, along with tapioca starch.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Torc View Post
    Thank you for the heads up. I think I will just accept either to avoid those recipes or that they will not be as thick as intended.
    Why are you afraid to use potato or tapioca starch? I wouldn't advocate making "brownies," "cake", "cookies" and "bread" out of the stuff with any sort of regularity, but using a tablespoon of it here or there to thicken a stew or sauce is absolutely fine.

    That being said, I have a pretty decent brownie recipe that uses around 3 tablespoons of potato/tapioca starch in an entire batch. Something like that is a decent dessert in the event you have a dinner party or something.
    Last edited by ChocoTaco369; 04-11-2012 at 09:11 AM.
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    I'm most concerned over it's effect on blood sugar levels, being type 2 diabetic.

    On a positive note, while reading through The Good Egg, egg yokes can be used to thicken a soup by mixing the yoke with hot water, then pouring it into the soup or sauce.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Torc View Post
    I'm most concerned over it's effect on blood sugar levels, being type 2 diabetic.

    On a positive note, while reading through The Good Egg, egg yokes can be used to thicken a soup by mixing the yoke with hot water, then pouring it into the soup or sauce.
    I strongly, strongly doubt a teaspoon of potato starch in a soup swimming with fat and fibrous vegetables will have any noticeable effect on your blood sugar. Obviously, test with a blood glucose monitor, but the protein in the soup is probably going to elevate it more than such a trivial amount of healthy carbohydrate.

    You can also look into xanthan gum. I would vastly prefer potato starch because potatoes are real food and xanthan gum is a corn/algae byproduct, but it's pretty much pure fiber and a tiny pinch has a huge thickening effect. I chicken homemade chocolate sauce I make with xanthan gum (unsweetened cocoa powder + water + stevia) and it takes maybe half a teaspoon for it to turn into chocolate pudding. You may want to look into that, too. Such trivial amounts pay me no concern, but I do know people with IBS are often highly sensitive to ANY xanthan gum.
    Don't put your trust in anyone on this forum, including me. You are the key to your own success.

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