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Thread: Red meat consumption, iron metabolism and accelerated aging page 2

  1. #11
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    Ohhh, the well runs deeper. There's a whole 'institute' dedicated to this subject:

    Iron Disorders Institute:: Chronic Diseases Affected by Iron

    To quote one scary claim:

    "This iron-mediated disease process is associated with iron levels well below those observed in hemochromatosis and has been implicated in multiple metabolic disorders, the worsening of many disease conditions, and premature death and disability."

    This page makes it sound like giving blood is the only way to effectively lower levels near the high end of normal:

    Iron Disorders Institute:: Therapies

    This page gives a good list of iron content in foods:

    Iron Disorders Institute:: Diet

    Showed me I was wrong about orange juice but right about red meat and spinach.

  2. #12
    peril's Avatar
    peril is offline Senior Member
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    Orange juice is an issue because vitamin C promotes the uptake of dietary iron
    Four years Primal with influences from Jaminet & Shanahan and a focus on being anti-inflammatory. Using Primal to treat CVD and prevent stents from blocking free of drugs.

    Eat creatures nose-to-tail (animal, fowl, fish, crustacea, molluscs), a large variety of vegetables (raw, cooked and fermented, including safe starches), dairy (cheese & yoghurt), occasional fruit, cocoa, turmeric & red wine

  3. #13
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    The human body actually does have a large number of compounds and systems related to regulating systemic iron levels as well as ways to regulate the amount of iron actually absorbed from the diet (which can vary but normally runs at a paltry 15%). Hell, your body even sweats the stuff out. Simply put, if your body is functioning properly then it simply sheds iron in the digestive system before it can be absorbed into your body.

    More importantly one of the primary compounds that your body uses to deal with dangerous free iron levels is to simply bind it with (apo)transferrin. This protein does a great job at preventing iron toxicity in your body, but there is one main thing that can prevent it from accomplishing this task. Transferrin production and utilization is negatively affected by inflammation. Inflammation is already well associated with "multiple metabolic disorders, the worsening of many disease conditions, and premature death and disability."

    Vitamin C only significantly improves the absorption of non-heme (plant form) iron but has not been shown to significantly improve heme iron absorption in humans.
    "You can demonstrate the purpose and limits of human digestion with a simple experiment: eat a steak with some whole corn kernels, and see what comes out the other end. It won’t be the steak."
    -J.Stanton

  4. #14
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    An uncle of mine has hemochromatosis and my brother recently found out that the has it as well, which means that for the rest of his life he might have to practice blood letting to keep his levels in check (like my uncle has to do). Both of them eat shit food prone to cause inflammation. Meanwhile I red meat daily and liver multiple times a week and never test high. If your body is functioning properly then you have nothing to worry about.
    "You can demonstrate the purpose and limits of human digestion with a simple experiment: eat a steak with some whole corn kernels, and see what comes out the other end. It won’t be the steak."
    -J.Stanton

  5. #15
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    Thanks for the info ProtoAlex!...my education continues.
    Some comments/questions below->

    Quote Originally Posted by ProtoAlex View Post
    Simply put, if your body is functioning properly then it simply sheds iron in the digestive system before it can be absorbed into your body.
    But a diet 'high' in heme iron could certainly overload this capacity. What I mean is even if 'only' 15% of dietary iron is absorbed, that could lead to excessive blood iron levels if the diet consists of large quantities of 'high iron content' foods. But what is 'large quantities'? I don't know, that gets back to my question of the optimal frequency of red meat consumption.

    Quote Originally Posted by ProtoAlex View Post
    More importantly one of the primary compounds that your body uses to deal with dangerous free iron levels is to simply bind it with (apo)transferrin. This protein does a great job at preventing iron toxicity in your body, but there is one main thing that can prevent it from accomplishing this task.
    According to Wikipedia (I know, I know):"Transferrin is a glycoprotein that binds iron very tightly but reversibly. Although iron bound to transferrin is less than 0.1% (4 mg) of the total body iron, it is the most important iron pool, with the highest rate of turnover (25 mg/24 h)."
    In other words, at best it can regulated blood iron levels by a mere 0.1%. The reason is seems to be something else the article stated: it's main role is to 'transport' iron from iron absoprtion centers to cells throughout the body.

    Quote Originally Posted by ProtoAlex View Post
    Transferrin production and utilization is negatively affected by inflammation. Inflammation is already well associated with "multiple metabolic disorders, the worsening of many disease conditions, and premature death and disability."
    I'd like to learn more about this if you have any links to share.

    Quote Originally Posted by ProtoAlex View Post
    Meanwhile I red meat daily and liver multiple times a week and never test high.
    I used to eat red meat almost daily. I'm limiting now to about once a week. The Harvard study on centenarians (who all had blood iron levels at the 'low' end of the recommended range for 10 or more years) convinced me of that. But I may be wrong, I'd prefer to eat it daily.

    As for liver, I eat one serving weekly. Are you aware it's full of vitamin A? Vitamin A is fat soluble - i.e. it gets stored in fat. There are many case studies of people who developed toxic vitamin A levels from excess liver consumption. Apparently there's no easy way to "flush" vitamin A (or any other fat soluble vitamin) out of the fat reserves once they're in there.

    Lastly, once again, I'll point out the AMA is considering lowering the 'normal' range of blood iron. In other words whats been considered 'normal' range may in fact be 'high'.

  6. #16
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    Huh - interesting....

    I eat grass-fed red meat EVERY DAY along with lots of nonheme sources or iron (with vit C for better absorption) and have a hard time meeting the current RDA of Iron... as a pre-menopausal woman, i struggle with low iron (and boy can i feel it) The physical symptoms of being low in iron (the fatigue, feeling cold etc...) and of course the much more severe symptoms of actual anemia is, to me, the body's way of saying what it needs...

    I try to get all my nutrients from my food - so do not supplement iron, but honestly - considering the absorption rate, is this really an issue? a normal, healthy person getting too MUCH iron from food? (with the exception of eating loads of liver every day perhaps...) hmmmm

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alainneire View Post
    Huh - interesting....

    I eat grass-fed red meat EVERY DAY along with lots of nonheme sources or iron (with vit C for better absorption) and have a hard time meeting the current RDA of Iron... as a pre-menopausal woman, i struggle with low iron (and boy can i feel it) The physical symptoms of being low in iron (the fatigue, feeling cold etc...) and of course the much more severe symptoms of actual anemia is, to me, the body's way of saying what it needs...

    I try to get all my nutrients from my food - so do not supplement iron, but honestly - considering the absorption rate, is this really an issue? a normal, healthy person getting too MUCH iron from food? (with the exception of eating loads of liver every day perhaps...) hmmmm
    Yep, this is a topic that is completely different between men and _pre-menopausal_ women.
    You're getting a monthly iron flush that men just don't get (unless they donate blood monthly).
    That's why researchers think pre-menopausal women have lower rates of cardio related disease than males who don't give blood regularly.

    Well they're lower at least until they become post-menopausal. Then they catch up quickly to their same-age male counter parts.

    Based on what you've shared, sounds like you need the iron. Enjoy the red meat!

  8. #18
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    Found thes after a little Googling tonight, my research continues. The first is an exceptionally technical article on iron metabolism:

    Biochemical Journal (2011) 434, 365-381 - J. Wang and K. Pantopoulos - Regulation of cellular iron metabolism

    I'm still digesting whether it sheds any light on red meat consumption. Also, here is interesting paper presenting data on iron deprivation and successful aging:

    http://skinboutique.ca/Iron%20Scientific%20Paper.pdf

    None of this bodes well for diets high in red meat. I mean the fact that qualified researchers are making definite links between longevity and IRON DEPRIVATION should be telling us something.

    I'm listening...anybody else, Bueller, Bueller??

  9. #19
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    Does whale meat and seal meat count as red meat? If so, what have Inuit people been doing about it for the last few thousand years? Their bodies must have a way of regulating iron levels....
    And the Maasai who drink cow's blood? Do they also donate?
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    Met my 2012 goals by losing 24 pounds.
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  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by jojohaligo View Post
    Does whale meat and seal meat count as red meat? If so, what have Inuit people been doing about it for the last few thousand years? Their bodies must have a way of regulating iron levels....
    And the Maasai who drink cow's blood? Do they also donate?
    Good questions, so I googled them, here's what I found:

    Do Primitive Peoples Really Live Longer? : Disease Proof

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