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    Minagelina's Avatar
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    Kids and Primal Eating Advice

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    My littlest one is getting really stopped up these days, and she eats a lot of brown rice (per her MSA testing, that is one of the only grains she tolerates.) Anyway, I am going GAPS with both my kids in a little under two months so they will be eating a strict diet. Meanwhile I am trying to get her to eat veggies. She used to eat a little broccoli, and she would even willingly try stuff. Now she says, "yuck" and won't get near it. I am worried about her, and she has got to be nutritionally deficient. How do you who have Paleo families (she's three years old) get your little ones to eat the food? Do you tell them to eat at least one bite of the veggies? Do you give them the stuff they WILL eat? But then if you do, how do they move on to try other things? I am leaning towards "this is what we're eating, take it or leave it" as I have an autistic kid and am already making all of our food from scratch. But if that's a bad idea, I am open to recommendations. HELP!!!!!!


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    lil_earthmomma's Avatar
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    Ok, so we approach this a few different ways:

    1. The "no thank you bite": this is the bite every person must take before they can reject it as yucky, unedible, disgusting, gross, barfarific... lol. It works really well for us. After that one bite, they are able to say no thank you and don't have to try any more, until next time it is served. I have found that my toddlers will say no thank you a few times, and then one day will happily eat it! lol

    2. Smoothies. I stuff a ton of baby spinach into morning smoothies, as well as coconut milk, some frozen berries and a banana usually. Yum, full of healthy fat, and greens! They used to be totally unaware of the greens due to the berries, but now they help make them and we call them dinosaur leaves and talk about how strong they make us.

    3. We make new foods an adventure. Today we went to the asian market and smelled, touched and saw so many vegetables and foods we were unfamiliar with. We made it a really fun outing, and both boys got to pick a new food to bring home to try. The five year old picked a dragon fruit, and the 3 year old picked garlic ramps! I picked a young coconut, and also bought some sashimi grade salmon, eel, and surf clam. We had a sushi night, dipped our new foods (new for the boys) into tamari, and talked about how interesting the garlic ramp mushroom stirfry was. They were so pumped to try so many new things, and we applauded them when they bravely tasted everything with an open mind.

    4. Cheese sauce. Nuff said. This can make any vegetable edible.
    The more I see the less I know for sure.
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    Minagelina's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lil_earthmomma View Post
    Ok, so we approach this a few different ways:

    1. The "no thank you bite": this is the bite every person must take before they can reject it as yucky, unedible, disgusting, gross, barfarific... lol. It works really well for us. After that one bite, they are able to say no thank you and don't have to try any more, until next time it is served. I have found that my toddlers will say no thank you a few times, and then one day will happily eat it! lol
    OK, this is something we've done, and I like the concept. But what if she has meat and a veg, doesn't like the veg, and finishes the meat? If we have no more meat to give her and she's still hungry, do you scrounge for something else to give or do you say to eat the veg or they're done? This is one of my dilemmas. She'll not want the veggies, and she'll want more meat (which we usually don't have extra of because it is so freakin' expensive), so she says she wants more to eat. I don't know what to give her, if anything, at that point.

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    cynethia916's Avatar
    cynethia916 is offline Junior Member
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    Good luck, my son won't eat anything. He is starving himself to get out of eating real food. He will eat organic apple sauce, and organic yogurt,cheese, and potatoes (sweet and not). He is almost five... does not eat eggs, any meat that has ever come off of a bone, and veggies, no fruit. He will eat sausage and bacon that I get from a local farm. I hope there will be more suggestions. My kid can go days without eating anything, and just drinking water. I just hold on knowing that he would not have a better nutritional profile if I let him eat what he wants... corn dogs.

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    lil_earthmomma's Avatar
    lil_earthmomma is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Minagelina View Post
    OK, this is something we've done, and I like the concept. But what if she has meat and a veg, doesn't like the veg, and finishes the meat? If we have no more meat to give her and she's still hungry, do you scrounge for something else to give or do you say to eat the veg or they're done? This is one of my dilemmas. She'll not want the veggies, and she'll want more meat (which we usually don't have extra of because it is so freakin' expensive), so she says she wants more to eat. I don't know what to give her, if anything, at that point.
    Ah! Yes we are in the same boat. I do two things, the first is to say that we have no more meat for dinner, so if they are still hungry they should have some veg. If this isn't going to happen, they wait until the next offering is provided. My boys eat Breakfast, snack, lunch, snack, dinner, snack usually.

    I would stock up on cheap meat options for her. We roast whole chickens and turkeys and then cut up the meat and leave it in the fridge for snacks, lunches, omelettes etc. The meat lasts quite a while this way. Also canned fish etc. My boys love smoked oysters in olive oil. They also love beef jerky, so we make that a lot, which is cheap and delicious.
    The more I see the less I know for sure.
    -John Lennon

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    DASawyer's Avatar
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    Try looking into different preparation methods, as well. I was a "no vegetables" kid well into my late teens... when I discovered that vegetables tasted good in Mexican food (ate the burrito WITH the peppers and stuff, because I was eating with a new friend and didn't feel like exposing my pickyness). Then I discovered that vegetables tasted good in Hmong food. I discovered numerous dishes, mostly from ethnicities other than my own, that included fairly large amounts of vegetables and tasted great. I still don't care for vegetables the way my parents prepare them... boiled or steamed, minimally salted, and served on the side... though I can choke them down if that's all that's available.

    When preparing vegetables, remember a few things you may fear: saturated fat is not bad, salt is not bad (real salt, not the refined sodium-chloride our culture usually uses) even carbs are not bad if they're clean and not refined. Don't make them eat vegetables. Make the vegetables taste good.

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    Minagelina's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DASawyer View Post
    Try looking into different preparation methods, as well. I was a "no vegetables" kid well into my late teens... when I discovered that vegetables tasted good in Mexican food (ate the burrito WITH the peppers and stuff, because I was eating with a new friend and didn't feel like exposing my pickyness). Then I discovered that vegetables tasted good in Hmong food. I discovered numerous dishes, mostly from ethnicities other than my own, that included fairly large amounts of vegetables and tasted great. I still don't care for vegetables the way my parents prepare them... boiled or steamed, minimally salted, and served on the side... though I can choke them down if that's all that's available.

    When preparing vegetables, remember a few things you may fear: saturated fat is not bad, salt is not bad (real salt, not the refined sodium-chloride our culture usually uses) even carbs are not bad if they're clean and not refined. Don't make them eat vegetables. Make the vegetables taste good.
    Ah, you know that is true. I LOVE non western food. I worked at a college cafeteria, and I had a Hmong lady working there with me. Good reminder to me to try that. And I didn't like veggies on the side until around that time anyway when people there at the caf would eat it. I thought, if they like it, maybe I should try again. Meanwhile, I usually have celtic or Himalayan salt around here, and I suspect adrenal issues with all of us, so we're salt lovers. I let her dose almost to her heart's content. No saturated fat fear here either.

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