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Thread: Opting out of Health Care, Primally. page 2

  1. #11
    mandabear2010's Avatar
    mandabear2010 is offline Senior Member
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    Primal Fuel


    Wow this hit on the right day. I actually canceled a Dr appt that my mom kept nagging me to set up that I was supposed to go to today.


    I have a tendency to get boils (I know it's gross...) from being overweight... well now that I am losing weight so quickly plus eating healthily I haven't seen or felt one in 3 weeks... I decided it was a good time to not go to the doctor... because if this is fixing itself why pay the 20 dollar co-pay in the first place. I will go to the dentist and get my annual woman check done just because it has been ground into me... otherwise... I am with Greg get yourself a HIGH LIABILITY insurance plan and a good HSA and you are covered!

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  2. #12
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    Hi, Greg


    I do have money enough to get myself treated for a broken bone, and my auto insurance would cover a MODEST injury from an accident -- but a major accident would bankrupt almost anyone these days, even those who thought they had good coverage. Hospitals can run up tens of thousands of dollars a day as soon as sneeze.


    I am not anti-insurance in general -- I have house insurance, for instance. I'm just anti-health-insurance because it's set up so badly, it has so much corruption, and the health treatments it pays for are so often ill-advised themselves. It's the opposite of a sound insurance practice, which uses a big pool of people who will never need to make a claim to pay a little each so that the small minority who need the service can get it paid for. Insuring for a certain and predictable expense is madness.


    In short, I think our trouble isn't lack of health insurance, it's lack of health. If almost everyone is headed toward near-certain serious degenerative disease, absolutely no insurance program or government aid will be able to pay for it.


  3. #13
    Greg B's Avatar
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    See my first post. I agree the standard health insurance is bunk.


  4. #14
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    Greg, P.S.


    If our life expectancy is better than Grok's, I put it down to better neonatal care, and public health measures like hygiene, sewage treatment, and inoculation, not to conventional medical treatment. Also to building codes, better design of automobiles (crumple zones) and regulation of hazardous substances, not that Grok had to encounter our thousands of chemicals or drive our cars.


    I think that medicine has gone seriously astray when a procedure like setting a normal uncomplicated broken bone takes someone's whole life savings. And I think that while anyone can have a bone broken in an accident, an uncomplicated fall shouldn't break anything in a healthy person. Maybe bruises, maybe very troubling strains and tendon problems, but not outright breakage.


    My opinion only ...


  5. #15
    piano-doctor-lady's Avatar
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    Mandabear, BRAVO!!


    You're on your way!


  6. #16
    gini's Avatar
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    I go to the doctor once a year for a physical and a pap. I don't see why I would stop doing that. Cancer is scary and there's no reason to not have testing done yearly.


  7. #17
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    Well put, piano-doctor-lady. You said:


    "When doctors make mistakes, they make BAD mistakes!"


    This cannot be emphasized enough.


  8. #18
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    @gini


    I can think of some reasons, but also some other reasons to do things your way.


    My mother kept nagging me to get a mammogram. I never did, I outright refused. One day my sister (who had full medical through Hewlett Packard) had a mammogram which revealed a little tiny lump, very small, but in a bad place, down near the chest wall. She had a little in-office surgery, local anesthetic, to take out a little cherry-sized part of her breast including the tiny lump, so it could be analyzed. It was analyzed, and it was benign. My mother then said, "Well, now your sister will understand why she MUST get a mammogram!" But my sister answered, "no I think she'll understand why she truly doesn't want a mammogram." The cost of this procedure was about 7,000 dollars, which in her place I would have had to pay out of pocket. Plus there was the anxiety, plus though she said that the people were very concerned and sympathetic, the procedure itself was really an ordeal.


    To sum up -- false negatives, false positives, unnecessary follow-ups, anxiety and expense, and just possibly the wrong treatment.


    On the other hand, just possibly one of those exams might help you.


    I think everybody has to judge the odds for themselves.


  9. #19
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    I have to disagree with some of what is being said. I am a GI endoscopy nurse and spend much of my day doing colonoscopies. We often remove polyps which, if left alone for several more years, would develop into cancers. Too many times I have had patients who have not come in for a routine screening at age 50, then ten years later they have bleeding, come in for a colonoscopy, and we find cancer. Our team has found a number of cancers in healthy asymptomatic people in their early 50s; having a colonoscopy surely saved their lives, as their cancers were found early enough that a colon resection surgery was all they needed (no chemo or radiation). We find polyps in about a third of our patients - one snip with a forceps and it's gone forever. Colon cancer is lifestyle related for sure, but there is a strong genetic componant, and we have found cancer and pre-cancers in lots of healthy, lean people with no family history. The prep for the colonoscopy sucks and dealing with the prep and the procedure will cost you two days, but it's a hell of a lot easier than being treated for cancer.

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  10. #20
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    Primal Blueprint Expert Certification


    Annika; we've all gotta die of something. I'm not saying I might not smack myself in the head if I ever got colon cancer, but with my diseaseless family history and exemplary health habits, I'm playing the odds.


    Piano-doctor-lady, I have a story similar to yours. A friend was in a panic when they saw something on her mammogram, and she was in mental anguish for about two months before they went in and took out a huge chunk of tissue, including muscle, which turned out to be nothing. She had trouble lifting her arm a year later, and about $10,000 in unpaid doctor bills, and stress and trauma that will last her entire life and probably shorten it by a couple of years. Three cheers for diagnostic testing, huh?


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