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Thread: A Question for Primal Parents About Schooling

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  1. #1
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    A Question for Primal Parents About Schooling

    What do you do about schooling your children? Do you send them to public schools? Are there private schools that align with primal concepts that you can send them to? I'm not a parent. I'm a (very underemployed) teacher and I was wondering what schooling a primal child would look like since (a) I want to teach a curriculum that aligns with primal concepts and (b) I plan to one day raise primal babies (given that I can find a sexy primal mate - not to be confused with primate - to make primal babies with). I know of people who have opened their own schools based on their own concepts and curricula (the environmental schools in Los Angeles, for example). So I might even consider opening up a school that charters specifically to primal kiddos. If I do this, where should it be and would anyone be interested in sending their kids?

  2. #2
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    Hell ya! So to be biased Id say near boston

    Not sure where the highest concentration of primals is.. it might be in California?
    Primal since March 2011

    Female/29 years old/5' 1"/130ish lbs

  3. #3
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    I send my son to steiner schools (also called waldorf), and they are not "primal." Bread is sort of central to their curriculum, it seems. But they do gluten free bread, so it works well for us with that.

    I'm not too fussed about it, really. And, they are out of doors all the time -- most of the time during the day for both part of their education (gardening, simply being n the woods, etc). And they do a lot of hand working and hand building such as knitting, clay and woodworking, etc. It's also based in mythology, which I think is important, and they focus on a pedagogy that leads to an autodidactic outcome. I really think that is interesting.

    I'm not sure what a "primal" school would look like.

    Perhaps look at The Continuum Concept?

  4. #4
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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dragonfly View Post
    Many of my Primal clients "unschool". Google it!
    Compulsory schooling is a scam.

    The Ultimate History Lesson: A Weekend with John Taylor Gatto (Intro + Hour 1 of 5) - YouTube

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by ChefGrok View Post
    Oooooh! John Taylor Gatto! Thanks for bringing back good memories from my college education courses!

    As for a more "Primal" way of schooling-- try looking into the Forest Schools (Forest kindergarten - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia). I haven't researched them as much as I would like, but I love their philosophy of spending their time almost exclusively outdoors (they’re outside unless it’s below 10 C or there is a dangerous storm). They teach toddlers to cook over fires, children work together to weave willow branch structures, they learn to cart wool and care for animals (in some schools), and they learn about the environment in a primarily child-led manner. Children get their exercise by exploring the forest, climbing trees, and playing. They learn math and other subjects through nature. I would love to teach my children in a very similar way.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dragonfly View Post
    Many of my Primal clients "unschool". Google it!

    Yeah, unschooling is a solid option. I will likely head in that direction myself at the midschool age.


    I have two daughters, one in Kindergarten, the other in 2nd grade. I'm CONSTANTLY battling with staff and parents about feeding my children junk food. The public school system here feels that it is necessary to keep children on a CONSTANT sugar high. It drives me mad. I explain that I feed my kids, that they have no need to have a sugar-based snack every hour. Yet, they still do it. I am unable to be at school all day, so the battle continues.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jiigigaw View Post
    Yeah, unschooling is a solid option. I will likely head in that direction myself at the midschool age.


    I have two daughters, one in Kindergarten, the other in 2nd grade. I'm CONSTANTLY battling with staff and parents about feeding my children junk food. The public school system here feels that it is necessary to keep children on a CONSTANT sugar high. It drives me mad. I explain that I feed my kids, that they have no need to have a sugar-based snack every hour. Yet, they still do it. I am unable to be at school all day, so the battle continues.
    That's a bummer, I'm planning to unshool my boys, to avoid stuff like that.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by ChefGrok View Post
    That's a bummer, I'm planning to unshool my boys, to avoid stuff like that.
    Not an option here Someone has to pay the bills
    Primal since March 2011

    Female/29 years old/5' 1"/130ish lbs

  10. #10
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    We unschool our 13 yr. old. If you want to know the legal way to homeschool in California you can check out this website:

    Homeschooling in California

    We tried Waldorf School and charter school and found that one thing they both had in common was that their approach to education was that the learning experience was teacher led. With unschooling all the learning is led by the child, so the child learns to trust his instincts. We've been unschooling longer than we've been primal but unschooling makes perfect sense from a primal point of view. Paleolithic children certainly weren't taken away from their families for 8 hours a day, instead they would have been free to follow their own interests and mimic/learn from various members of their community.

    Unschooling not only allows my son to pursue his own intellectual interests but it allows his body to follow it's own rhythms, he can wake up when he wants and eat when he needs to. In my experience I have found unschooled and home-schooled kids to be much more sure of themselves and comfortable with talking with people of all ages.

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