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Thread: Grokette still hungry! page 2

  1. #11
    grandma's Avatar
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    I would say you are still a sugar addict. Even though you don't eat a lot of sugar, you eat so frequently that you are running mostly off the sugars you do get. Combine the meals into a couple large meals rather than spread out over the day.

    It's grandma, but you can call me sir.

  2. #12
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    Thanks heaps everyone! I can't believe how many replies I got in a day. Very appreciated. So from all of this I am receiving this information:


    1.) I am eating to much protein compared to fat, need more fat, but need to avoid rice bran oil.


    2.) Eat more 'hefty' meals less frequently.


    3.) Attempt to either A.) Get more veggies, or B.) be more carnivorous, depending on which method works better for me.


    I will truly take these suggestions to heart!


    Blaze, welcome fellow Crohn's-er! I have been on a mishmash of the FODMAP and SCD diets with a dairy allergy ( so no butter!) for sometime. Since going SCD (without dairy) I have improved in leaps and bounds. But I still eat very nibbly because of that dreaded fear of pain! I have never taken drugs for it (refused) and went on this diet journey right after I was diagnosed, which has its negatives, but I'm very happy with primal. Thanks again everyone!


    Jasetyn


  3. #13
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    Hi Jasetyn, not sure if it makes much difference but looking at my post again I realized that I gave confusing advice about the fat ratios before. If you're going carnivorous, then you'll want to keep a 1:1 ratio of fatrotein, which will give you about twice as many calories from fat as from protein, since fat has more calories than protein does (per gram). If you're going for more veggies, then you'll want to go for about 50% total of your calories from fat. Hopefully I didn't just make that even more confusing! :-)


  4. #14
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    Thanks Kcurtain, I think I'm taking it all in, haha.


  5. #15
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    Jasetyn, good going on managing the Crohn's!


    I'm glad to see that you are aware of the SCD diet. I read Elaine Gottschall's book last year, and while I don't have Crohn's or ulcerative colitis, my digestion has never been very good either (especially when it comes to tolerating "healthy" vegetables!). I tried the SCD diet and did better than before. In particular, it was a miracle cure for the hay fever that had made me miserable in late spring for 50 years! Never thought I'd manage that ...


    Anyway, I was quite compliant about eliminating disaccharides and starches, but I got an almighty peanut butter and honey habit going. Now I've thrown them both out of my diet and am still adjusting to their loss.


    One of the very best foods for intestinal healing, which I don't see in your menu, is bony soup/stew. I take a lamb roast (leg of lamb, or shoulder roast, or ham hocks, or lamb shank, or a chicken carcass, and of course oxtail would be good if you can get it) and cook it very slowly in the crockpot till the connective tissue is just falling off the bones. If the broth cools it will gel, with a little solid fat on top. Then I scoop out some of the meat, eat it, and put everything (minus bones) into a saucepan, adding some carrots and celery, maybe an onion, and a mushroom or two now and then (though Elaine doesn't like them.) Sometimes a dab of butter or coconut oil, sometimes a few cherry tomatoes. The fat from the meat is all there, too. The gelatin is very healthy, and the whole dish is extremely satisfying. Plenty of fat to satisfy your other advisers.


    Once all the broth is made into soup and gobbled up, I just wash out the crock pot, bring another grassfed lamb or beef cut or ham hock out of the freezer, plug in the crock pot, turn it to low, put in water, and start all over. I always have this delicious and satisfying food at some point in the process from thawing frozen joint or ham hock (my favorite) to the last of the soup.


    Glutamine powder is supposed to help heal intestines as well, and overcome carb cravings. The bony soups are similar in chemistry to glutamine, I believe.


    Once cleaned right off, the bones can be saved as well. I put them in the wood stove's firebox to char, and then crumble them into the garden soil. Calcium phosphate is where you find it ... by doing this, everything these good local grassfed animals have given me is put to use. I like to think, they didn't live all that long, but they should surely have been happy, safely grazing in a beautiful place, looked after by good people (my friends.)


    My aim isn't just to heal my lifelong leaky gut. (Caesarean, two weeks premature, then no breast milk --cow's milk formula-- then weaned to cheap carbs - corn flakes, white bread with margarine and grape jelly for breakfast - ugh.) I want all the glucosamine and chondroitin and gelatin in that connective tissue to heal my knees and tendons. I certainly hope that even after several years of bad knees, they will still be able to heal eventually, slowly if necessary.


  6. #16
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    Wow, I have bad knees and I'm 23! I wonder if the gelatin helps the joints? I'm really not up on this knowledge. I would love to take some kind of calcium supplement as osteoporosis runs in my family (mom diagnosed when she was 35!) but with my Crohn's I don't absorb minerals and vitamins well anyway. If I don't have a crock pot, is there another method? I live with 4-5 other roomates and I wouldn't want to disturb them too much. I also understand your peanut butter habit!! I can't have honey (not FODMAP approved) but today is my last day on peanut butter. I can't say I'm too excited about eating meat and meat for the next couple of months, but hopefully I'll get used to it. Thanks for your help!


  7. #17
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    Definitely get anything out of your diet that could possibly cause a flare up. Peanut Butter was one of a few things I couldn't take much of so I cut it out.


    I remember one of the defining things I did to reverse Crohn's was fasting a few days at a time. I did this while learning and converting to a primal lifestyle. I remember I had pain in my foot that was there because of high inflammation in my body. When I had flare ups the pain in my foot was unbearable. After the bouts of fasting before switching to primal the pain went away completely. Perhaps I gave my body enough time to repair damage instead of digesting but I am not sure on that one.


    Weight training has helped as well even though it sounds like it wouldn't. For some reason, heavy barbell squats have also reduced inflammation in my body.


    Good luck to you and I hope the condition reverses itself for you as well. It's a great feeling to not worry about it anymore.


  8. #18
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    Good luck, Jasetyn


    Gelatin helps everything. Picture what slow roasting meat which includes joints does. It slowly cooks down the connective tissue till it's either soft enough to eat or it's in the gel. So you are eating the very substance you want to build up in your own body. Plus it tastes good, with a little practice cooking.


    A crock pot is handy, but you can get the same results, more or less, by putting the joint in a roasting pan with some water and a lid, and putting it into a very slow oven (about as low as the oven dial will go and still be above "warm.") Add the veggies later when you want to make soup from the juices. They get pretty disgusting when roasted slowly for hours and hours.


    That gel in the juices from roasting has really good minerals. Add a little acid like lemon juice are just a little wine vinegar, and your roasting will get even more of the calcium out of the bone.


    Vitamin D is really important, I'm finding out more and more. I've started taking supplements of D3, lots. If you have trouble affording it, or worry about absorbing it, you can try gradually spending time outdoors (maybe you do already?) in the middle of the day. If you're like me, pale from an Oregonian winter, build up slowly to avoid a burn. Also good for one's state of mind, daylight.


    I hope all goes very well for you!


  9. #19
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    Thanks very much for the kind words and information blaze and piano, it does not go unnoticed!


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