Results 1 to 3 of 3

Thread: Mummy Gut Flora page

  1. #1
    seashells's Avatar
    seashells is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    DFW
    Posts
    182

    Mummy Gut Flora

    Primal Fuel
    Found this article this morning and thought I'd share. Can't tell if it was already posted. Although I wouldn't go so far as to suggest mummy fecal implants (what if we all went movie-spooky?), maybe we could do more to keep our intestinal bacteria happy and populous.

    Could obesity be cured by injecting our guts with fecal bacteria from ancient mummies? | MNN - Mother Nature Network

  2. #2
    Lewis's Avatar
    Lewis is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    2,346
    Thanks for that.

    From the article:

    Interestingly, the content and diversity of our gut bacteria has not only been linked to obesity and metabolism, but it has also been linked to mental health. For example, our floral content has been shown to help control depression and anxiety, and likely plays a crucial role in the regulation of our brain chemistry.
    Yes, also see this article linked by Mark in Weekend Link Love just today:

    Autism More Common Than Previously Thought: CDC Report Shows One in 54 Boys Identified
    Autism more common than previously thought: CDC report shows one in 54 boys identified

    However, no mention of gut bacteria in the article on autism despite the strong connections with gut dysbiosis found by Dr. Natasha Campbell-McBride and others.

    There is a lot of information out there, but few people seem to be joining the dots.

    More from the mummy article:

    Interestingly, researchers found that ancient human gut bacteria is more akin to what is found in the guts of non-human primates, such as chimpanzees. By comparison, the intestinal contents of modern humans appear more depleted and sterilized.
    That's unsurprising. I'm a little sceptical of the idea that a "microbial soup" based on the mummy's faeces would be a panacea for obesity, though. I've heard before that the obese have different gut ecology. However, what's cause and what's effect here? And, while non-food factors e.g. damage from antibiotics, could be playing into this, is that all?

    If you didn't eat right to support the Ancient Egyptian bacteria, I've a feeling you might be back where you started pretty soon. Could "King Tut's" gut bacteria survive on twinkles and coke?

    Also, I'd understood that there were many hundreds of bacteria, some of which were quite localized and dependent on what's in the local diet. Thus the Japanese gut biome includes bacteria that are good at breaking down seaweed, since it's in their diet and their gut bacteria has evolved with them and their changing dietary habits.

  3. #3
    Blackcatbone's Avatar
    Blackcatbone is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Nashville
    Posts
    2,192
    Primal Blueprint Expert Certification
    Quote Originally Posted by Lewis View Post
    Also, I'd understood that there were many hundreds of bacteria, some of which were quite localized and dependent on what's in the local diet. Thus the Japanese gut biome includes bacteria that are good at breaking down seaweed, since it's in their diet and their gut bacteria has evolved with them and their changing dietary habits.
    Not quite, but close. Gut bacteria evolves with the food we eat, not us. We have a symbiotic relationship with our gut flora which we obtain through our diet. As in, it hitches a ride to our guts through the food we eat. Thus, it's important to eat some raw, home-grow fruit and veggies if we want to be able to digest them.

    The study about Japanese and their gut flora focused on a specific population that was the only one known to have a very specific gut bacteria. The found that they also were the only population to eat a specific seaweed, which harbored the same bacteria. The breast feeding infants didn't have it. It wasn't until they started eating the seaweed that it appeared. So, people eating a Western diet, highly processed and sterilized, have limited bacteria because they aren't getting any through their diet. Germ phobia has actually made us sicker.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •