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Thread: Steak vs. Lamb page

  1. #1
    NWPrimate's Avatar
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    Steak vs. Lamb

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    I accidentally posted this over in the recipes section first...sorry.


    I just noticed that the lamb shoulder steaks that my wife brought home were $8.99 per pound.
    I was curious how that compared to the grass fed beef rib-eyes she's been buying, and saw that they were $14.99 per pound.

    I sure love a good rib-eye, but I think I might just like the tender delicious fattiness of the lamb steaks even more. Usually she gets steak in a 3/1 ratio with lamb, because she doesn't like eating cute animals, but I'm still working on converting her. I'm thinking about asking her to get more lamb and less beef the next trip considering the price difference.

    The lamb is Umpqua Valley, and says pasture raised on the package. I'm curious at what age lambs are slaughtered for steaks. Do they have a chance to eat grass, or are they still on milk as slaughter time?

    I guess if the lambs are pasture raised, it follows that their mothers are as well, so that helps.

    Does anyone have any knowledge on the nutritional differences between lamb and beef, given similar habitats and feeding conditions? I know lamb is a lot fattier, but I'm a fat eater and it seems like a natural way to keep the bulk of my calories coming from fat.

    I'd love to hear some thoughts on fatty acid profiles, nutritional density, whether the lambs are eating grass or more likely suckling etc...

    I love being able to pick the collective brain of such a knowledgeable group.

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    I can't answer most of your questions, but lambs are weaned long before they head to slaughter. Thay start eating forage after just a few weeks, and pastured tastes much better. They are several months old before they reach market weight, which around here is about 60 - 80 lbs live weight.
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    Yeah, "Lamb" doesn't mean those cute little infants that you see on Easter cards. "Lamb" is anything under a year, if I'm not mistaken. "Mutton" is anything older than that.

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    Typically lamb is harvested anywhere from 4-8months old... Yes,they eat grass... they are precocious animals and begin to forage within weeks in addition to milk and may be weaned at about a month when the rumen is fully developed or allowed to nurse for 2-3 months if not separated from the ewe.
    And they are VERY tasty!

    When I used to do farm help I swapped work for 2 lambs a year with a family... they butchered late at 9-10months. But they hadn't gotten the muttony taste yet. Typically they don't go to the strong mutton flavor until later in their second year, but growth slows and there is no gain in feeding through a winter.
    Last edited by cori93437; 03-27-2012 at 10:51 PM.
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    peril's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lily Marie View Post
    Yeah, "Lamb" doesn't mean those cute little infants that you see on Easter cards. "Lamb" is anything under a year, if I'm not mistaken. "Mutton" is anything older than that.
    Here, lamb < 1 yo, hogget < 2 yo and mutton is older

    Lamb is nutritionally as good as beef. I think it is far superior to beef when slow-cooked. Goat is similar
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    Quote Originally Posted by peril View Post
    Here, lamb < 1 yo, hogget < 2 yo and mutton is older

    Lamb is nutritionally as good as beef. I think it is far superior to beef when slow-cooked. Goat is similar
    Goat...yum...

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    Quote Originally Posted by peril View Post
    Here, lamb < 1 yo, hogget < 2 yo and mutton is older

    Lamb is nutritionally as good as beef. I think it is far superior to beef when slow-cooked. Goat is similar
    Yes, lamb up one year, hogged from one to two, and mutton over that, in UK too. I LOVE mutton!! Got about 5 mutton shoulders in the freezer - my favourite joint!

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    I think of lamb as being a more tender version of beef. I love lamb!
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    I used to avoid lamb, having only been exposed to bad versions courtesy of Easter buffets. Decided to try it again and now I'd say it may be my favorite meat. That and pastured beef definitely are tops in terms of nutritiousness, but I don't have any data to link: just figure they eat the most grass, so they're packing in the most omega 3 goodness, CLA, etc.

    I find lamb in this area (central PA) is very pricey and the farms that sell it far fewer than beef or pork. Maybe Americans in general have lost their taste for it? Definitely looking to clear some freezer space and stock up in a couple of weeks, found a farm with AMAZING pastured pork, and their lamb is going to be butchered soon.

    Enjoy goat, that's also probably right up there nutritionally, but have only had it in Indian restaurants, and find it a little tougher.

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    I love lamb. It's kind of spendy but the taste of lamb is so exotic compared with the usual fair. I love to blend lamburger and ground turkey to make mediterrean-like burgers. I suppose you could just lamb for the same, but the blend is great- trust me!
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