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  1. #1
    sdubrul's Avatar
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    Bioindividuality in diet

    Primal Fuel
    Hey Gang..I had a discussion the other day with a massage therapist/nutritionist and she is studying nutrition from a school that promotes individuality in diet. This to mean that some people would do good on paleo, others on vegan and others on grains predominantly. I didn't have time to go deep into it but it did get me thinking and I did ask questions.

    1. How do you measure "do better" on a specific diet?
    2. How would the vegan or grainatarian get the essential fatty acids needed in the quantity needed?
    3. Does this mean that other species, like cats, would also do better on an individual diet?

    My understanding is that the human genome is more similiar than any other species which argues that we all would do well on what our genome needs...mainly meat, veggies, fruits and water.

    Thoughts

    Thanks
    Scott

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    lopisheep's Avatar
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    #2. Sacha inchi supplements are great for oils. Some people use flax seeds. Nuts have good oils. Coconut oil. Cold pressed extra virgin olive oil. Avocados. Durian. Lots of ways to get oils.

    #1. Well, I would keep it simple. Are you feeling happy, are you feeling strong, are you getting rid of health issues -- fat and all those other modern diseases, are you able to control your food without feeling deprived all the time?

    I mean, if you start a lifestyle or temporary diet, how does it affect you as an individual? Does your skin get clearer, is your breathing better, do your intestines complain less, how is going to the bathroom, can you move better, are your moods more stable, etc.?

    #3. Not sure about cats. Mine eat a simple dry food and are thriving. My livestock always liked lots of green things and a few oats, some healthy salt, and lots of water. They all thrived. I gave horses extra oats on hard working days. Carrots and apples were appreciated by all -- horses, goats, sheep, and cattle.

    Well, that was sort of simple. Not to worry! You'll get lots of complex answers and thoughts as well, I am sure. On this forum, we love to talk:-)

  3. #3
    magnolia1973's Avatar
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    I think she is spot on in her assessment. Different people thrive on different diets. The key is to eat real, whole foods. For a vegan that means beans, fruits, veggies- not tofutti, soy burgers and soda. For someone who needs low carbs- that's real meats, veggies, not "low carb ice cream and a McDonalds hold the bread".

    I have seen very healthy vegetarians. I do think veganism is hard to get right. I think the more (whole) foods you can eat, the better it is, the easier it is.

    I also think how much we enjoy our food has an impact on our ability to stay happy on healthy foods. If you are say, going low carb and miss sweet tastes and start eating chemicals, maybe you should eat moderate carbs. If you are vegan and eat soy patties, maybe you should try some meat.

  4. #4
    paleo-bunny's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sdubrul View Post
    Hey Gang..I had a discussion the other day with a massage therapist/nutritionist and she is studying nutrition from a school that promotes individuality in diet. This to mean that some people would do good on paleo, others on vegan and others on grains predominantly. I didn't have time to go deep into it but it did get me thinking and I did ask questions.

    1. How do you measure "do better" on a specific diet?
    2. How would the vegan or grainatarian get the essential fatty acids needed in the quantity needed?
    3. Does this mean that other species, like cats, would also do better on an individual diet?

    My understanding is that the human genome is more similiar than any other species which argues that we all would do well on what our genome needs...mainly meat, veggies, fruits and water.

    Thoughts

    Thanks
    Scott
    1. 'Better': fewer infections, better energy levels, better quality of sleep, healthier % body fat, fewer chronic ailments
    2. They can't unless they eat a ton of seaweed and that can screw up the thyroid.
    3. No. Cats are carnivores.

    There are lots of epigenetic changes in our genome which affect which diet best suits us.

    BBC News - Study links womb environment to childhood obesity

    Some of these epigenetic factors are determined by what our grandparents ate, others to the environment of our mother's womb. We can drive some epigenetic modification through changes in lifestyle through a gene-environment interaction. There's clearly a lot more research required before we'll have any definitive answers and it's a hot topic right now.

    I believe there are genomic factors too, especially regarding genes encoding the immune system (which relate to food intolerances).

    Some metabolic disorders and differences are manifested in the mitochondria. These have their own genome (DNA) and are inherited from our mother via her egg cell. Mitochondria are the part of the cell where energy is generated from the end-products of metabolised fats, proteins, carbohydrates and alcohol. They are analagous to symbiotic microorganisms living within our cells (they're believed to be of bacterial origin).

    So, it's complicated. I believe there's a lot of scope for adaptive variation - which is backed up by observations of nutrition in various tribes all over the world. However, like you I believe that very few people if any are well adapted to eating unsprouted wholegrains, or to veganism or vegetarianism.
    Last edited by paleo-bunny; 03-19-2012 at 08:52 AM. Reason: grammar
    F 5 ft 3. HW: 196 lbs. Primal SW (May 2011): 182 lbs (42% BF)... W June '12: 160 lbs (29% BF) (UK size 12, US size 8). GW: ~24% BF - have ditched the scales til I fit into a pair of UK size 10 bootcut jeans. Currently aligning towards 'The Perfect Health Diet' having swapped some fat for potatoes.

  5. #5
    not on the rug's Avatar
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    just an observation about the animals question. animals eat what they are supposed to eat until people start feeding them alpo and beggin strips and other shit like that, or feeding cows corn, etc. it's when they don't eat what they are supposed to eat that the problems begin

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    We could simultaneously be overall more similar as a species, yet more diverse in terms of our ideal diet. Food for thought. I don't think there is very much good research in this topic, but there are lots of variations on it like the blood type diet etc. I doubt it's 100% woo, but I suspect most people do best with something closer to paleo than to vegan or to SAD.
    If you are new to the PB - please ignore ALL of this stuff, until you've read the book, or at least http://www.marksdailyapple.com/primal-blueprint-101/ and this (personal fave): http://www.archevore.com/get-started/

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    Bioindividuality is the blood type diet. Dr. Peter D'Adamo is the foremost expert on that. His genotype theory is pretty interesting & seems to help a lot of people. I personally use the Hunter food list/guidelines.

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