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Thread: Seasonal Allergy's Anti-histamine foods page

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    activia's Avatar
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    Seasonal Allergy's Anti-histamine foods

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    OK Spring appears to have sprung early this year in the Northeast. I'm sadly starting to feel some slight allergy symptoms.. so I think its time to start honing in on foods that can help alleviate them more then just eating primal...

    I found this:
    Healthy Eating: Anti-histamine Foods - JPost - Health & Science

    I actually think that fruit makes my allergies worse (I had a ton of cut strawberries yesterday which is why I'm sure I had a slight sinus headache..) But this might just be me. Since I felt this I dropped carbs from Noon until.. probably tonight. I'm going to try and stay away from fruit that seems to give me allergy symptoms Also only having starchy carbs at dinner...

    I'm thinking of trying lemon/ginger tea and sunflower seeds though. Anyone else have tips?
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    Another article..

    Carrots, spinach, mangoes, tomatoes, and other green vegetables are high in vitamin A and can be a very valid option to eat as an antihistamine. Fruits, especially citrus fruits like oranges, are high in vitamin C and can be used as an antihistamine as well. Salmon and walnuts along with some meats can be high in Omega-3 which makes a good antihistamine. Some foods are high in Quercetin and Pycnogenol which can help block the release of histamine by cells. These foods include broccoli, citrus fruits, berries, onions, garlic, and apples. Bromelian is an enzyme found in pineapples that is considered by many to be the best natural antihistamine.

    These foods that have antihistamine properties slow down the release of histamine to help with allergic reactions. Fruits and vegetables are not only good for you but are good for helping with allergies. Instead of taking a pill for a mild allergic reaction, you could eat an apple or orange. Rather than taking an antihistamine nasal spray, a person could have some steamed broccoli. There are so many fruits, vegetables and berries to choose from.

    ===
    Lucky as primals we eat so many vegetables!
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    activia's Avatar
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    I'm also going to try and get my hands on some more local honey and eat a little bit daily..
    Primal since March 2011

    Female/29 years old/5' 1"/130ish lbs

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    I found local honey helped my symptoms last year.

    I find that first article a bit iffy. Citrus is very histamine-promoting - this outweighs the effect of vitamin C. That's why it's used as a traditional cold remedy, to get the mucous flowing. Berries are also histamine promoting. Red wine is extremely high in histamine.

    Pineapple's a good one to try. It's one of the few fruits I ever eat. Also garlic, and the onion family in general.

    Red onions are the only food I know of that contain significant amounts of quercetin to have a noticable anti-histamine effect. Coffee and green tea are also quite powerful anti-histamines. Black tea is high in histamine because it's fermented.

    Any fermented foods, sardines, mackeral, smoked fish, hard cheeses are all high in histamine. Fresh salmon is quite beneficial as an antihistamine due to its high omega 3 content. But make sure it is fresh.

    Spinach and tomato are histamine-promoting.

    That's a distillation of my knowledge and experience.

    I find I have much more energy eating a low histamine diet as it helps stabilise my blood pressure, which can dip quite low during a histamine attack. Before I started this, I had chronic non-allergic rhinitis all year round, peaking at 3pm each day, and hayfever in the early spring only, i.e. I only react to tree pollen.
    F 5 ft 3. HW: 196 lbs. Primal SW (May 2011): 182 lbs (42% BF)... W June '12: 160 lbs (29% BF) (UK size 12, US size 8). GW: ~24% BF - have ditched the scales til I fit into a pair of UK size 10 bootcut jeans. Currently aligning towards 'The Perfect Health Diet' having swapped some fat for potatoes.

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    activia's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by paleo-bunny View Post
    I found local honey helped my symptoms last year.

    I find that first article a bit iffy. Citrus is very histamine-promoting - this outweighs the effect of vitamin C. That's why it's used as a traditional cold remedy, to get the mucous flowing. Berries are also histamine promoting. Red wine is extremely high in histamine.

    Pineapple's a good one to try. It's one of the few fruits I ever eat. Also garlic, and the onion family in general.

    Red onions are the only food I know of that contain significant amounts of quercetin to have a noticable anti-histamine effect. Coffee and green tea are also quite powerful anti-histamines. Black tea is high in histamine because it's fermented.

    Any fermented foods, sardines, mackeral, smoked fish, hard cheeses are all high in histamine. Fresh salmon is quite beneficial as an antihistamine due to its high omega 3 content. But make sure it is fresh.

    Spinach and tomato are histamine-promoting.

    That's a distillation of my knowledge and experience.

    I find I have much more energy eating a low histamine diet as it helps stabilise my blood pressure, which can dip quite low during a histamine attack. Before I started this, I had chronic non-allergic rhinitis all year round, peaking at 3pm each day, and hayfever in the early spring only, i.e. I only react to tree pollen.
    Yeah further research shows that the foods that they thought would help actually have histamine in them! I know apples/strawberries/tomatoes def produce a histamine response. I have the Oral Allergy Syndrome. It is 100X worse on CUT fruit. I do much better eating it whole or cut 2 seconds ago..

    Dairy is also terrible for my allergies.. which is why I limit to just some raw milk aged cheddar.

    I have really bad tree pollen allergies, dust allergies, dust mites, and a VERY minor cat hair allergy (and I have 2 cats). I'm certainly a lot better then I was but I want to get even better....
    Primal since March 2011

    Female/29 years old/5' 1"/130ish lbs

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    Quote Originally Posted by activia View Post
    Yeah further research shows that the foods that they thought would help actually have histamine in them! I know apples/strawberries/tomatoes def produce a histamine response. I have the Oral Allergy Syndrome. It is 100X worse on CUT fruit. I do much better eating it whole or cut 2 seconds ago..

    Dairy is also terrible for my allergies.. which is why I limit to just some raw milk aged cheddar.

    I have really bad tree pollen allergies, dust allergies, dust mites, and a VERY minor cat hair allergy (and I have 2 cats). I'm certainly a lot better then I was but I want to get even better....
    I've made such good progress that I can tolerate goat's cheddar now in reasonable quantity. It's not so aged as cow's cheddar and has a sweeter taste. I've also reintroduced prawns. I can still get quite a strong reaction to chilli but it varies. Apart from that I'm still quite strict. I was avoiding asparagus, but seem OK with that now.

    I'm eating 1-2 red onions a day. I recommend you check out quercetin supplements.

    Eating food as fresh as possible is really important. Also, avoiding high histamine foods at breakfast and lunch is paramount. During the evening this is less important when eating quite late, as I usually do - these foods can actually help me sleep. So I usually eat fish in my evening meal. Eating fish at lunchtime can induce drowsiness and tends to make me nap when I do that on a non-work day.
    F 5 ft 3. HW: 196 lbs. Primal SW (May 2011): 182 lbs (42% BF)... W June '12: 160 lbs (29% BF) (UK size 12, US size 8). GW: ~24% BF - have ditched the scales til I fit into a pair of UK size 10 bootcut jeans. Currently aligning towards 'The Perfect Health Diet' having swapped some fat for potatoes.

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    what about sprouts? do they produce histamines? they are my main srouce of vegetables along with sweet potatoes
    If man made it, don't eat it

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    Quote Originally Posted by huntingBears View Post
    what about sprouts? do they produce histamines? they are my main srouce of vegetables along with sweet potatoes
    I'm not sure - I don't recall seeing them on a list of vegetables to avoid. I don't like sprouts. There's a very strong-tasting chemical in them which makes me feel nauseous. I don't eat cabbage very often as it makes me very gassy.
    F 5 ft 3. HW: 196 lbs. Primal SW (May 2011): 182 lbs (42% BF)... W June '12: 160 lbs (29% BF) (UK size 12, US size 8). GW: ~24% BF - have ditched the scales til I fit into a pair of UK size 10 bootcut jeans. Currently aligning towards 'The Perfect Health Diet' having swapped some fat for potatoes.

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    Quote Originally Posted by activia View Post
    Dairy is also terrible for my allergies.. which is why I limit to just some raw milk aged cheddar.
    This has been my realization of late, and it's a real bummer. I love dairy. But it makes me snarfly. And that makes me sad.

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    I, too, have heard that local honey is one of the best anti-springtime allergy cures, but since I rarely get seasonal allergies, I can't vouch from personal experience.

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