Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 22

Thread: How is canned salmon, cooked? page

  1. #1
    Cyclops's Avatar
    Cyclops is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    15

    How is canned salmon, cooked?

    Maybe a bit trivial, but it's not obvious to me - how is canned salmon cooked? Or processed, to make it safe. I was just looking at a can, and it says "ready-to-eat", which implies something was done to kill parasites, etc. But it doesn't mention what.

    Edit - it's wild-caught Alaskan pink salmon (Whole Foods 365 house brand).
    Last edited by Cyclops; 03-17-2012 at 11:56 AM.

  2. #2
    Alaska Ang's Avatar
    Alaska Ang is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    136
    The process of canning cooks it. In home canning you cook in a pressure cooker for 90 minutes which takes the temperature above 200, then creates a vacumn seal as it cools. Same with soups, vegetables and other meats. I don't know exact specifics in commercial canning, but it should be something similar.

  3. #3
    KathyH's Avatar
    KathyH is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    252
    I am sorry I don't know what they add to kill parasites but I would like to know what kind of salmon it is in a can to begin with Most of them are farmed GMO from what I know.
    For canning processing they use the lesser quality. The type that wouldn't even go for freezing because it's already lower grade. Most likely the fish has been exposed to longer storage/oxidation, therefore the most secure of processing is canning. I would be reluctant to eat it.

  4. #4
    Nady's Avatar
    Nady is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Arizona
    Posts
    1,263
    Quote Originally Posted by KathyH View Post
    I am sorry I don't know what they add to kill parasites but I would like to know what kind of salmon it is in a can to begin with Most of them are farmed GMO from what I know.
    For canning processing they use the lesser quality. The type that wouldn't even go for freezing because it's already lower grade. Most likely the fish has been exposed to longer storage/oxidation, therefore the most secure of processing is canning. I would be reluctant to eat it.

    from Salmon - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


    Canned salmon in the U.S. is usually wild Pacific catch, though some farmed salmon is available in canned form. Smoked salmon is another popular preparation method, and can either be hot or cold smoked. Lox can refer either to cold smoked salmon or to salmon cured in a brine solution (also called gravlax). Traditional canned salmon includes some skin (which is harmless) and bone (which adds calcium). Skinless and boneless canned salmon is also available.

  5. #5
    KathyH's Avatar
    KathyH is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    252
    Quote Originally Posted by Nady View Post
    from Salmon - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    Canned salmon in the U.S. is USUALLY wild Pacific catch, though some farmed salmon is available in canned form. Smoked salmon is another popular preparation method, and can either be hot or cold smoked. Lox can refer either to cold smoked salmon or to salmon cured in a brine solution (also called gravlax). Traditional canned salmon includes some skin (which is harmless) and bone (which adds calcium). Skinless and boneless canned salmon is also available.
    Notice your quote says usually. So it's rather a belief or opinion and not a fact. So it's a partial evidence. On the contrary, even the canning factories don't always know the source of their salmon as they are in the business of canning. The distribution of farmed and wild caught salmon is rather chaotic. There is no true oversight over the origin of the fish or shellfish. Granted, some reputable companies for the sake of labeling would do their own investigation. So if it is not labeled or certified you will not know what you are getting. It may or it may not be GMO, so why would you want to eat it?

  6. #6
    GrokON's Avatar
    GrokON is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    315
    If something is labeled as "wild" or "caught in the Pacific Northwest" (for example) then it is wild caught. At least in Canada, but I would expect in the U.S. too. No need to overthink this.

    Canned anything (Salmon included) is cooked to a high heat. This also makes the bones edible.
    5'6" Female, 29 Years Old, 260/195/120

    "Discipline is choosing between what you want NOW, and what you want MOST!"

  7. #7
    KathyH's Avatar
    KathyH is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    252
    Quote Originally Posted by GrokON View Post
    If something is labeled as "wild" or "caught in the Pacific Northwest" (for example) then it is wild caught. At least in Canada, but I would expect in the U.S. too. No need to overthink this.

    Canned anything (Salmon included) is cooked to a high heat. This also makes the bones edible.
    The point is that most of them are not labeled where the salmon comes form. The person quoted wikipedia stating that it is USUALLY wild Pacific catch. So if it is not labeled then what should I assume? I don't want to over think anything.

  8. #8
    Owly's Avatar
    Owly is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    3,823
    Quote Originally Posted by KathyH View Post
    The point is that most of them are not labeled where the salmon comes form. The person quoted wikipedia stating that it is USUALLY wild Pacific catch. So if it is not labeled then what should I assume? I don't want to over think anything.
    The OP stated that the canned salmon was labelled clearly as wild-caught Pacific salmon. If you're not confident in salmon that's not labelled as wild-caught, then make sure you buy stuff that is clearly identified as such. Problem solved.
    “If I didn't define myself for myself, I would be crunched into other people's fantasies for me and eaten alive.” --Audre Lorde

    Owly's Journal

  9. #9
    Nady's Avatar
    Nady is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Arizona
    Posts
    1,263
    Best guess, if it's not labeled 'Wild Caught Pacific', then it's Atlantic farmed. I only buy wild caught~ and I'd rather have wild caught canned than fresh farmed!

  10. #10
    KathyH's Avatar
    KathyH is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    252
    Primal Blueprint Expert Certification
    Quote Originally Posted by Nady View Post
    Best guess, if it's not labeled 'Wild Caught Pacific', then it's Atlantic farmed. I only buy wild caught~ and I'd rather have wild caught canned than fresh farmed!
    Not necessarily. If it is not labeled, it could be farmed in British Columbia or Chile, you will never know.

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •