Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 31

Thread: Grain-fed Beef - Eating 2 pounds per day. Dangerous? page 2

  1. #11
    adameads's Avatar
    adameads is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Lexington, KY
    Posts
    201
    You could check out eatwild.com for local farmers that produce grass fed beef.

  2. #12
    jakey's Avatar
    jakey is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Posts
    1,292
    Quote Originally Posted by Sihana View Post
    when you consider 1lb of grass-fed is a lot more calorie dense than 2lbs of grain-fed.
    i'm not sure how you figure that one...

  3. #13
    ChocoTaco369's Avatar
    ChocoTaco369 is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Narberth, PA
    Posts
    5,537
    Quote Originally Posted by ASC View Post
    For a couple of reasons:

    1. I'm under the impression that keeping carbs below 100 grams per day is optimal.
    2. I'd like to gain some lean muscle mass so I want to keep my protein intake at 1 - 2 grams per pound of body weight. (I'm currently 165 lbs, and targeting 200 to 230 grams of protein per day.) Even with the amount of meat, I still supplement with protein shakes to get to this level of protein.
    There is no reason to avoid carbohydrate, especially at your maintenance level of calories.

    1.1-5g/lb of lean body weight of protein AND carbohydrate a day is what I'd recommend you consume. So, if you're 180 lbs and 12% body fat, your lean mass is 88% of 170 lbs, or 150 lbs. That would have you consuming a daily average of 150-225g of protein and carbohydrate a day. I would recommend you break that up based on your workout schedule. Protein would always remain in the 150-225g range every day, but carbohydrate intake would fluctuate. On days you don't exercise, you'd eat around 100g of carbohydrate a day. Meanwhile, on days you lift heavy things, you'd eat more like 300-350g of carbohydrate a day. Adjust your fats accordingly - rest days would be significantly higher fat, while on workout days, you want to keep fats low. Generally the lower the better, and I keep it under 30g on those high carb days.

    There's no need for 99% of the population to eat under 100g of carbohydrate. Ketogenic diets are unnecessary and muscle-wasting unless you have a rare condition, like diabetes (which isn't caused by consumption of carbohydrate but rather individual foods, chemicals, omega 6 fats and constant snacking), cancer or epilepsy.

    BTW, 1.5-2lbs of beef a day isn't a lot. I weigh 140 lbs and I eat 1.5 lbs of meat a day. If I can't fit meat into my macros, I fill it up with eggs, yogurt or cottage cheese. I always try and eat my weight in grams worth of animal-based protein every day, and often go pretty far over. Over 150g of protein is typical, and I eclipse 200g at least once a week.
    Last edited by ChocoTaco369; 03-13-2012 at 09:29 AM.
    Don't put your trust in anyone on this forum, including me. You are the key to your own success.

  4. #14
    ChocoTaco369's Avatar
    ChocoTaco369 is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Narberth, PA
    Posts
    5,537
    Quote Originally Posted by jakey View Post
    i'm not sure how you figure that one...
    It's wrong. Grass-fed beef is actually leaner than grain-fed beef. Calories will be msotly comparable, with grass-fed having slightly less than grain-fed. I think she meant "more nutrient dense." Grass-fed beef is more nutrient dense than grain-fed beef, but it's not that big of a difference. Not enough to justify a 200+% price increase in my current state, anyway.
    Last edited by ChocoTaco369; 03-13-2012 at 09:30 AM.
    Don't put your trust in anyone on this forum, including me. You are the key to your own success.

  5. #15
    lssanjose's Avatar
    lssanjose is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Tigard, OR
    Posts
    1,491
    Quote Originally Posted by ChocoTaco369 View Post
    There is no reason to avoid carbohydrate, especially at your maintenance level of calories.

    1.1-5g/lb of lean body weight of protein AND carbohydrate a day is what I'd recommend you consume. So, if you're 180 lbs and 12% body fat, your lean mass is 88% of 170 lbs, or 150 lbs. That would have you consuming a daily average of 150-225g of protein and carbohydrate a day. I would recommend you break that up based on your workout schedule. Protein would always remain in the 150-225g range every day, but carbohydrate intake would fluctuate. On days you don't exercise, you'd eat around 100g of carbohydrate a day. Meanwhile, on days you lift heavy things, you'd eat more like 300-350g of carbohydrate a day. Adjust your fats accordingly - rest days would be significantly higher fat, while on workout days, you want to keep fats low. Generally the lower the better, and I keep it under 30g on those high carb days.

    There's no need for 99% of the population to eat under 100g of carbohydrate. Ketogenic diets are unnecessary and muscle-wasting unless you have a rare condition, like diabetes (which isn't caused by consumption of carbohydrate but rather individual foods, chemicals, omega 6 fats and constant snacking), cancer or epilepsy.

    BTW, 1.5-2lbs of beef a day isn't a lot. I weigh 140 lbs and I eat 1.5 lbs of meat a day. If I can't fit meat into my macros, I fill it up with eggs, yogurt or cottage cheese. I always try and eat my weight in grams worth of animal-based protein every day, and often go pretty far over. Over 150g of protein is typical, and I eclipse 200g at least once a week.
    The reason for that kind of protein calculation is based on your having not as much body fat, as before, thus having your lean muscle mass higher? Thanks. I'm still doing the 70%-80% of lean muscle mass formula, and wonder if I should ramp it up to the amount of lean muscle mass.

  6. #16
    ChocoTaco369's Avatar
    ChocoTaco369 is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Narberth, PA
    Posts
    5,537
    Quote Originally Posted by lssanjose View Post
    The reason for that kind of protein calculation is based on your having not as much body fat, as before, thus having your lean muscle mass higher? Thanks. I'm still doing the 70%-80% of lean muscle mass formula, and wonder if I should ramp it up to the amount of lean muscle mass.
    Protein consumption is generally considered to be ideal in the 1-2g/lb of lean body mass range from what I've read. If you're overweight, in my opinion, you should be eating an even higher level of protein than someone who is lean. And here's why I believe that to be:

    1.) Protein has the highest TEF - roughly 20-30% of calories are lost from your metabolism increasing. Your body works hard to process protein, where carbohydrates are much easier to process and fats are by far the simplest of all. This far outshines fat and carbohydrate and is a huge metabolic advantage. If you have a lot of weight to lose, pushing more calories to protein allows you to create a larger caloric deficit without cutting back on portion size. Basically, you can eat more eye round than ribeye before you halt your fat loss.

    2.) If you're overweight, you're going to be losing fat at a faster rate than someone who is underweight. Your state of catabolism will last a long time - someone with 100 lbs of weight to lose will be spending a year or two in a state of catabolism, while someone that needs to drop 5 lbs could do it in a few weeks. Since you'll be in a state of catabolism longer, that's more reason to eat protein to preserve as much muscle as possible during the extended weight loss period.

    3.) The increased protein will better adapt you to managing your hunger since it "stick with you" longer. You'll get used to eating less often, so when you get lean you'll be more likely to successfully intermittent fast regularly.

    A lean person looking to maintain their weight or slowly add lean muscle mass could get away with less protein. FWIW, my off days usually peg me at 130-150g of protein, while my workout days are usually 175-200+g of protein.
    Don't put your trust in anyone on this forum, including me. You are the key to your own success.

  7. #17
    ChocoTaco369's Avatar
    ChocoTaco369 is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Narberth, PA
    Posts
    5,537
    Quote Originally Posted by Sihana View Post
    I will do something no one else does on this forums.

    I admit I was wrong.

    I assumed it was more calorie dense, and not just more nutrient dense and slower digestion. Thank's for the correction.
    Ha. Looking back from what I believed when I first started Primal vs now, I'd say nearly all of my posts in the first 6 months were wrong, and I can't vouch for the accuracy of anything I've said after that. Damn n=1 experiments...
    Don't put your trust in anyone on this forum, including me. You are the key to your own success.

  8. #18
    Lily Marie's Avatar
    Lily Marie is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    717
    Grass-fed meat IS more calorie/protein dense than the regular grocery store/grain fed beef.
    It's because the grocery store meat is pumped with water. It adds weight and more to the price tag.

    EVERY time I try to cook a Safeway ribeye steak in a pan, the damn thing fills up with water and dilutes my butter. Pisses me off.
    I'm done with grocery store meat - unless in a dire situation.

  9. #19
    ChocoTaco369's Avatar
    ChocoTaco369 is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Narberth, PA
    Posts
    5,537
    Quote Originally Posted by Lily Marie View Post
    Grass-fed meat IS more calorie/protein dense than the regular grocery store/grain fed beef.
    It's because the grocery store meat is pumped with water. It adds weight and more to the price tag.

    EVERY time I try to cook a Safeway ribeye steak in a pan, the damn thing fills up with water and dilutes my butter. Pisses me off.
    I'm done with grocery store meat - unless in a dire situation.
    Minimally processed grain-fed meat is more calorically dense than minimally processed grass-fed meat. You're not buying minimally processed meat. The overwhelming majority of grocery store meats are not pumped up with anything. Beef, pork, veal and lamb are almost always safe as they come cut straight from the store butcher and are on plastic trays wrapped in plastic wrap. What you have to be careful with are cuts that don't come from the store. Chicken breast is usually sent pre-packaged, as it pork loin, beef tenderloin, whole chickens/turkeys/ducks/geese and the like. Those things packaged out of store are generally pumped up with a salt and sugar solution. You have to read the labels and make sure they specifically state "minimally processed". All the chicken, beef and pork I buy from the grocery store are minimally processed and contain no solution.

    Simply put, if you're buying meat with a label on it, it wasn't packaged in-store and didn't come from the butcher. It was loaded already sliced and packaged on a truck somewhere. Buy the meat that's cut in-house, or specifically ask the butcher for a fresh cut, not pre-packaged meat.
    Last edited by ChocoTaco369; 03-13-2012 at 10:34 AM.
    Don't put your trust in anyone on this forum, including me. You are the key to your own success.

  10. #20
    lssanjose's Avatar
    lssanjose is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Tigard, OR
    Posts
    1,491
    Quote Originally Posted by ChocoTaco369 View Post
    Minimally processed grain-fed meat is more calorically dense than minimally processed grass-fed meat. You're not buying minimally processed meat. The overwhelming majority of grocery store meats are not pumped up with anything. Beef, pork, veal and lamb are almost always safe as they come cut straight from the store butcher and are on plastic trays wrapped in plastic wrap. What you have to be careful with are cuts that don't come from the store. Chicken breast is usually sent pre-packaged, as it pork loin, beef tenderloin, whole chickens/turkeys/ducks/geese and the like. Those things packaged out of store are generally pumped up with a salt and sugar solution. You have to read the labels and make sure they specifically state "minimally processed". All the chicken, beef and pork I buy from the grocery store are minimally processed and contain no solution.

    Simply put, if you're buying meat with a label on it, it wasn't packaged in-store and didn't come from the butcher. It was loaded already sliced and packaged on a truck somewhere. Buy the meat that's cut in-house, or specifically ask the butcher for a fresh cut, not pre-packaged meat.
    I'll consider this, in the near future. I also avoid those cuts with solutions in them, and just find straight up meat.

Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •